What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

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    What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    Papi plunking had nothing to do with reporters; it was retaliation, plain and simple
    by Gordon Edes/ESPN

    I'm inclined to give David Ortiz the benefit of the doubt for things said after 2 a.m., an hour in which conversation as a rule tends to veer toward the impolitic, ill-mannered and intemperate. By that time, Ortiz had been at Yankee Stadium for the better part of 10 hours, had endured an interminable rain delay and had the makings of a baseball-sized black and blue mark on his right thigh, courtesy of a fastball from Yankees left-hander CC Sabathia.





    Ortiz also knew he wouldn't be hauling himself into bed for another couple of hours, at least, with the Red Sox needing to fly to Toronto, clear customs and bus downtown to the team hotel, lucky to grab a few hours' sleep before a game against the Blue Jays Friday night.


    So it should probably come as little surprise to anyone that the sunny disposition usually associated with Big Papi was nowhere in sight when he drew himself up before a small cluster of bleary-eyed reporters gathered around his locker and blistered them with a short machine-gun burst of self-righteous anger. It was their fault, he made it clear, Sabathia felt obliged to drill him with a pitch in the fourth inning Thursday night.



    "You waiting for me?'' he said. "There will be no questions. Just Big Papi talking, and if you don't like it, you can get the [expletive] out of here.



    "I just want to thank you guys -- not all of you, most of you -- for the stat today of me not getting hit by the Yankees. I finally got hit. Hope you [expletives] are happy. I'm done.''




    And with a few more muttered expletives, he was out the door. There would be no discussion of his remarkable performance in this three-game sweep of the Yankees: home runs in each of the first two games and two hits in the seventh inning of the series finale that served as catalyst and coda to Boston's stunning seven-run rally that deflated the last vestige of pinstriped pride.


    Ortiz had been pushed toward the edge ever since Yankees manager Joe Girardi said he "didn't care for" the way he had flipped his bat following his home run off a Yankees rookie, Hector Noesi, on Tuesday night. That night, he seemed more bemused than anything that Girardi would have taken offense.



    "I mean, it's not my first time, it's not going to be my last time,'' Ortiz had said. "Big deal. I enjoy the game. I'm a home run hitter. It's not like I do it all the time. It's part of the excitement, you know what I mean? What can I tell you?''



    But when questions about Girardi's remarks persisted the next night, Ortiz grew more bellicose, finally saying, "I'm done with that [expletive].''



    Girardi, for his part, seemed eager to get past the flip-flap, and Yankees pitchers obviously did not consider it egregious enough to target Ortiz the next night.


    "He's had a lot of success [against the Yankees],'' Girardi said before Thursday's game. "I think you do get feelings about certain teams. We moved him off the plate [Tuesday], and the next pitch or two, he hit a home run.



    "The bottom line is if you don't make pitches he's going to hurt you and hurt you bad.''



    It is true that after Tuesday's game, in which Red Sox pitcher Jon Lester kneecapped Mark Teixeira and Russell Martin with cut fastballs (both clearly with no malice aforethought) and Ortiz had (in Girardi's view) shown up the Bombers with his bat flip, it was widely disseminated that Ortiz had never been hit by a pitch by the Yankees in 160 regular-season games.
    By any measure, that is a remarkable number, not only in underscoring that Yankees pitchers had never placed a bull's-eye on his back, but that not a single errant pitch, especially from a left-hander, had so much as grazed the billowy blouse of his uniform. It is even more striking given the damage Ortiz has inflicted on the Yankees over the years --.307 average, 34 home runs, 124 RBIs and the epic back-to-back walk-off hits (one a home run) in the 2004 ALCS.



    But here is where Ortiz gives too much credit to the media for Sabathia implanting a fastball in his leg:



    •  The Yankees did not throw at him Wednesday, even with headlines such as "Papi Crock" blaring from the back page of tabloids.



    • Even after Josh Beckett hit Derek Jeter in the elbow with the second pitch of Thursday's game, a further pretext for throwing at Ortiz had they already been inflamed by the media to do so, Sabathia didn't even come inside to Ortiz.



    • It was only after Beckett also hit Alex Rodriguez in the hip with a pitch in the third inning that Sabathia responded. By then, the scorecard showed five Yankees hit by pitches in the series, the Red Sox none. The Yankees' left-hander, of course, insisted it was just a pitch that got away, but it was retaliation executed with textbook precision, thrown in a place -- the meaty part of Ortiz's thigh -- intended to inflict minimal damage.



    • Finally -- and this is the part Ortiz ignored most in his middle-of-the-night rant -- this was hardly the first time it has been noted in print and on the public airwaves that the Yankees have never made a Ortiz a marked man. Consider this headline on a column by Mike Vaccaro in the New York Post: "It's About Time the Bombers Drop David"


    "The Yankees have to drop Papi," Vaccaro wrote. "They need to brush the Beast back. The Yankees need to pick out one of David Ortiz's chins and let a little music drive across his whiskers. And they need to do this immediately. If Ortiz were any more comfortable at the plate, he'd bring a chaise longue, a pitcher of pina coladas and a couple of Cuban cigars with him to the batter's box.''



    That appeared in the Post on May 9, 2006. Five years ago.



    And it wasn't just the tabloids. The august New York Times noted that Ortiz had never been hit by a pitch by the Yankees and that after Andy Pettitte had come inside high and tight to Ortiz in spring training maybe that approach was about to change under the team's new manager. Fella by the name of Joe Girardi.



    "You have to try and take any hitter out of their comfort zone,'' said Dave Eiland, the Yankees pitching coach at the time, "whether it's David Ortiz or anybody else.''



    That was on April 12, 2008. Three years ago.



    So if the Yankees are taking their cues from the media, a dubious proposition for any team, they were awfully slow to absorb the message.



    It's never fun to be hit by a pitch hurled at better than 90 mph. That's a proposition that would make cowards of most of us. It's understandable, then, why Ortiz was grumpy. But to suggest that CC was responding to anything but the long-understood baseball code that calls for a pitcher to stand up for his teammates? That might fly in the middle of the night, but it doesn't stand up to the light of day.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    Edes is absolutely right. The matter is closed. Ortiz popped off after being hit by a pitch that obviously seemed to hurt his feelings (and maybe bruised his thigh). Edes should have responded to it to defend the general media, which Ortiz accused of being responsible for his HBP. It was immature on his part. With that said, he answered it the best way a player should answer an intentional HBP--2 hits in the one inning and helping his team win. He will be happy Big Papi soon, and everyone will enjoy his bantering and fun quotes. He's mad, let him be mad and let him take it out on Toronto's pitching staff.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from fenwayjack2. Show fenwayjack2's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    Ortiz got the last laugh  He broke the game wide open in the 7th with a drive that bounced off the 399 mark in left center and after steaming into 2nd base with a double, he clapped his hands and gave the Yank dugout the infamous "Texas Claw" which is the Rangers did when the beat the crap out of NY in the playoffs. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from fivekatz. Show fivekatz's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    Edes and all the other writers ae babies IMO and Gordo has always been amongst the biggest. They write and say whatever will sell and when the players won't take or call them out they whine about it in columns the next day.

    And Ortiz wasn't all wrong. It was a very weird situation to hit Ortiz in a 2-0 lead with a runner on first. So it while a retailation pitch was in order, if the media hadn't started the thing with the questions to Giardi about the bat flip and proceeded to beat into the ground for two days I think that Ortiz would not have been plunked in that situation.

    I still remember Gordo's column campaign against Manny Ramirez in 2006 and how when Manny rooters wrote him back that he was a tool how defensively impassioned he was in his own defense. But the players shouldn't turn it back on the media, whether they are right or wrong? Seems to me too many of the folks in the media can dish it out but can't take it.

    It's human nature I suppose, whether your Ortiz and your sick of two days "bat-flipgate" or you take it personally when Ortiz lays it on about your profession.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ez-r8zTQu4
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from aquachuck. Show aquachuck's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    In Response to Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?:
    Edes and all the other writers ae babies IMO and Gordo has always been amongst the biggest. They write and say whatever will sell and when the players won't take or call them out they whine about it in columns the next day. And Ortiz wasn't all wrong. It was a very weird situation to hit Ortiz in a 2-0 lead with a runner on first. So it while a retailation pitch was in order, if the media hadn't started the thing with the questions to Giardi about the bat flip and proceeded to beat into the ground for two days I think that Ortiz would not have been plunked in that situation. I still remember Gordo's column campaign against Manny Ramirez in 2006 and how when Manny rooters wrote him back that he was a tool how defensively impassioned he was in his own defense. But the players shouldn't turn it back on the media, whether they are right or wrong? Seems to me too many of the folks in the media can dish it out but can't take it. It's human nature I suppose, whether your Ortiz and your sick of two days "bat-flipgate" or you take it personally when Ortiz lays it on about your profession.
    Posted by fivekatz


    perfectly said, couldn't agree more fivekatz.  Gordo needs to move on & write about something else, how about the 7 game win streak? 
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from betterredthandead. Show betterredthandead's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    As usual, a captious Gordon Edes reserves his pride and prejudice for Ortiz and DiceK and the other players he doesn't like. This is a stilted and poorly written hack job that must have happened because Edes had to clear customs and was short on sleep.

    Ortiz is correct. The media took the layup pass from Girardi and, bereft of material, kept droning about it until the Yankee players capitulated with an obligatory plunking of Ortiz. Give the Yankees credit, their hearts weren't in it but the media cycle has a way of working like an itch. The media already uses a professional boxing approach to sports promotion, looking for a spike in ratings in a series that has been very one sided and without a lot of recent rancor between the players from the two teams. 

    Sorry Gordon, wrong again. Get some sleep before you decide to write your next self-serving drivel op.   
     
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    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    In Response to Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?:
    As usual, a captious Gordon Edes reserves his pride and prejudice for Ortiz and DiceK and the other players he doesn't like. This is a stilted and poorly written hack job that must have happened because Edes had to clear customs and was short on sleep. Ortiz is correct. The media took the layup pass from Girardi and, bereft of material, kept droning about it until the Yankee players capitulated with an obligatory plunking of Ortiz. Give the Yankees credit, their hearts weren't in it but the media cycle has a way of working like an itch. The media already uses a professional boxing approach to sports promotion, looking for a spike in ratings in a series that has been very one sided and without a lot of recent rancor between the players from the two teams.  Sorry Gordon, wrong again. Get some sleep before you decide to write your next self-serving drivel op.   
    Posted by betterredthandead


    I totally agree.  I couldn't believe what I was reading in the NY Daily News and the NY Post, practically calling for the Yanks to hit Ortiz.  Edes is wrong.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    In Response to Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?:
    Edes and all the other writers ae babies IMO and Gordo has always been amongst the biggest. They write and say whatever will sell and when the players won't take or call them out they whine about it in columns the next day. And Ortiz wasn't all wrong. It was a very weird situation to hit Ortiz in a 2-0 lead with a runner on first. So it while a retailation pitch was in order, if the media hadn't started the thing with the questions to Giardi about the bat flip and proceeded to beat into the ground for two days I think that Ortiz would not have been plunked in that situation. I still remember Gordo's column campaign against Manny Ramirez in 2006 and how when Manny rooters wrote him back that he was a tool how defensively impassioned he was in his own defense. But the players shouldn't turn it back on the media, whether they are right or wrong? Seems to me too many of the folks in the media can dish it out but can't take it. It's human nature I suppose, whether your Ortiz and your sick of two days "bat-flipgate" or you take it personally when Ortiz lays it on about your profession.
    Posted by fivekatz


    Well said, as usual.  Only disagree with "while a retailation pitch was in order":  retaliation never in order; hitting guys intentionally (esp. with 97 mph fastballs) should be automatic heave from game.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from swhiting. Show swhiting's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    ESPN, being a national outlet, should be neutral. They are not. I stoped watching their drival a couple of years ago. They are like Fox News, they say they are one thing but are only out for their self interest and "partners" The local press are supposed to be biased. That's what the fans want and need.

    I don't blame David at all. These hyena's are questioning my opponents man hood and telling them to assault me... No, they have no right to insight violence against me and theaten my career. Gordon Edes should get in the batters box and see how it feels to have a 97 mph fastball thrown inside, let alone at his body. See what he thinks about it only hitting his thigh. I bet you he would get the police real quick. What a coward you are Mr Edes.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from REBEL. Show REBEL's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    In Response to What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?:
    Papi plunking had nothing to do with reporters; it was retaliation, plain and simple by Gordon Edes/ESPN I'm inclined to give David Ortiz the benefit of the doubt for things said after 2 a.m., an hour in which conversation as a rule tends to veer toward the impolitic, ill-mannered and intemperate. By that time, Ortiz had been at Yankee Stadium for the better part of 10 hours, had endured an interminable rain delay and had the makings of a baseball-sized black and blue mark on his right thigh, courtesy of a fastball from Yankees left-hander CC Sabathia . Ortiz also knew he wouldn't be hauling himself into bed for another couple of hours, at least, with the Red Sox needing to fly to Toronto, clear customs and bus downtown to the team hotel, lucky to grab a few hours' sleep before a game against the Blue Jays Friday night. So it should probably come as little surprise to anyone that the sunny disposition usually associated with Big Papi was nowhere in sight when he drew himself up before a small cluster of bleary-eyed reporters gathered around his locker and blistered them with a short machine-gun burst of self-righteous anger. It was their fault, he made it clear, Sabathia felt obliged to drill him with a pitch in the fourth inning Thursday night. "You waiting for me?'' he said. "There will be no questions. Just Big Papi talking, and if you don't like it, you can get the [expletive] out of here. "I just want to thank you guys -- not all of you, most of you -- for the stat today of me not getting hit by the Yankees. I finally got hit. Hope you [expletives] are happy. I'm done.'' And with a few more muttered expletives, he was out the door. There would be no discussion of his remarkable performance in this three-game sweep of the Yankees: home runs in each of the first two games and two hits in the seventh inning of the series finale that served as catalyst and coda to Boston's stunning seven-run rally that deflated the last vestige of pinstriped pride. Ortiz had been pushed toward the edge ever since Yankees manager Joe Girardi said he "didn't care for" the way he had flipped his bat following his home run off a Yankees rookie, Hector Noesi , on Tuesday night. That night, he seemed more bemused than anything that Girardi would have taken offense. "I mean, it's not my first time, it's not going to be my last time,'' Ortiz had said. "Big deal. I enjoy the game. I'm a home run hitter. It's not like I do it all the time. It's part of the excitement, you know what I mean? What can I tell you?'' But when questions about Girardi's remarks persisted the next night, Ortiz grew more bellicose, finally saying, "I'm done with that [expletive].'' Girardi, for his part, seemed eager to get past the flip-flap, and Yankees pitchers obviously did not consider it egregious enough to target Ortiz the next night. "He's had a lot of success [against the Yankees],'' Girardi said before Thursday's game. "I think you do get feelings about certain teams. We moved him off the plate [Tuesday], and the next pitch or two, he hit a home run. "The bottom line is if you don't make pitches he's going to hurt you and hurt you bad.'' It is true that after Tuesday's game, in which Red Sox pitcher Jon Lester kneecapped Mark Teixeira and Russell Martin with cut fastballs (both clearly with no malice aforethought) and Ortiz had (in Girardi's view) shown up the Bombers with his bat flip, it was widely disseminated that Ortiz had never been hit by a pitch by the Yankees in 160 regular-season games. By any measure, that is a remarkable number, not only in underscoring that Yankees pitchers had never placed a bull's-eye on his back, but that not a single errant pitch, especially from a left-hander, had so much as grazed the billowy blouse of his uniform. It is even more striking given the damage Ortiz has inflicted on the Yankees over the years --.307 average, 34 home runs, 124 RBIs and the epic back-to-back walk-off hits (one a home run) in the 2004 ALCS. But here is where Ortiz gives too much credit to the media for Sabathia implanting a fastball in his leg: •  The Yankees did not throw at him Wednesday, even with headlines such as "Papi Crock" blaring from the back page of tabloids. • Even after Josh Beckett hit Derek Jeter in the elbow with the second pitch of Thursday's game, a further pretext for throwing at Ortiz had they already been inflamed by the media to do so, Sabathia didn't even come inside to Ortiz. • It was only after Beckett also hit Alex Rodriguez in the hip with a pitch in the third inning that Sabathia responded. By then, the scorecard showed five Yankees hit by pitches in the series, the Red Sox none. The Yankees' left-hander, of course, insisted it was just a pitch that got away, but it was retaliation executed with textbook precision, thrown in a place -- the meaty part of Ortiz's thigh -- intended to inflict minimal damage. • Finally -- and this is the part Ortiz ignored most in his middle-of-the-night rant -- this was hardly the first time it has been noted in print and on the public airwaves that the Yankees have never made a Ortiz a marked man. Consider this headline on a column by Mike Vaccaro in the New York Post: "It's About Time the Bombers Drop David" "The Yankees have to drop Papi," Vaccaro wrote. "They need to brush the Beast back. The Yankees need to pick out one of David Ortiz's chins and let a little music drive across his whiskers. And they need to do this immediately. If Ortiz were any more comfortable at the plate, he'd bring a chaise longue, a pitcher of pina coladas and a couple of Cuban cigars with him to the batter's box.'' That appeared in the Post on May 9, 2006. Five years ago. And it wasn't just the tabloids. The august New York Times noted that Ortiz had never been hit by a pitch by the Yankees and that after Andy Pettitte had come inside high and tight to Ortiz in spring training maybe that approach was about to change under the team's new manager. Fella by the name of Joe Girardi. "You have to try and take any hitter out of their comfort zone,'' said Dave Eiland, the Yankees pitching coach at the time, "whether it's David Ortiz or anybody else.'' That was on April 12, 2008. Three years ago. So if the Yankees are taking their cues from the media, a dubious proposition for any team, they were awfully slow to absorb the message. It's never fun to be hit by a pitch hurled at better than 90 mph. That's a proposition that would make cowards of most of us. It's understandable, then, why Ortiz was grumpy. But to suggest that CC was responding to anything but the long-understood baseball code that calls for a pitcher to stand up for his teammates? That might fly in the middle of the night, but it doesn't stand up to the light of day.
    Posted by fir.eballer58


    EDES IS WRONG, THE PLUCK WAS MEDIA INSPIRED!  ESPECIALLY THE TV MEDIA...THEY WERE GOADING THE YANKS INTO RETALIATION!!
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from MASOXNH. Show MASOXNH's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    Strange days in yankee-land. I was expecting fireworks after Texeira went down, never mind Beckett hitting three, but there was nothing, just a weak rant from Girardi about a bat flip. Come on.

    Cafardo's story on the 9th aptly pointed out the lackluster tenor of these current bombers, even stated that the yanks needed to address Ortiz's comfort at the plate. CC's token plunking of Papi was ill-timed and way late, likely in response to the media furor. The fans were primed for it, as their reaction showed. If the yanks were interested in responding to "the long-understood baseball code"  it would have been much sooner.  Papi is right to be ticked, this one is on the media.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Boomerangsdotcom. Show Boomerangsdotcom's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    You know what...until you have been plunked by a 93 - 97 mph fastball in the small of your back you just don't know what these guys go through. I am amazed that these guys recover so quickly. When it happened to me I wanted a hospital bed! 
     
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    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    In Response to Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?:
    Edes and all the other writers ae babies IMO and Gordo has always been amongst the biggest. They write and say whatever will sell and when the players won't take or call them out they whine about it in columns the next day. And Ortiz wasn't all wrong. It was a very weird situation to hit Ortiz in a 2-0 lead with a runner on first. So it while a retailation pitch was in order, if the media hadn't started the thing with the questions to Giardi about the bat flip and proceeded to beat into the ground for two days I think that Ortiz would not have been plunked in that situation. I still remember Gordo's column campaign against Manny Ramirez in 2006 and how when Manny rooters wrote him back that he was a tool how defensively impassioned he was in his own defense. But the players shouldn't turn it back on the media, whether they are right or wrong? Seems to me too many of the folks in the media can dish it out but can't take it. It's human nature I suppose, whether your Ortiz and your sick of two days "bat-flipgate" or you take it personally when Ortiz lays it on about your profession.
    Posted by fivekatz


    The media eggs it on to maybe somehow make a bigger deal out of it (which they did in this case), and when it turns into one, they play the innocent role..These players ARE human too ya know..being the time of day, what transpired the last 2 days, AND having to hop on a plane to canada, do you blame him for being the way he was? I dont..I for one like to see papi with a bit of a tude..Hes a better player. And hes had one since everyone said his career was over. Keep doubting him and watch him keep proving everyone wrong..
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from soups. Show soups's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    "As usual, a captious Gordon Edes reserves his pride and prejudice for Ortiz and DiceK and the other players he doesn't like. This is a stilted and poorly written hack job that must have happened because Edes had to clear customs and was short on sleep.

    Ortiz is correct. The media took the layup pass from Girardi and, bereft of material, kept droning about it until the Yankee players capitulated with an obligatory plunking of Ortiz. Give the Yankees credit, their hearts weren't in it but the media cycle has a way of working like an itch. The media already uses a professional boxing approach to sports promotion, looking for a spike in ratings in a series that has been very one sided and without a lot of recent rancor between the players from the two teams.

    Sorry Gordon, wrong again. Get some sleep before you decide to write your next self-serving drivel op."

    Great post red.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    if joe girardi threw at Big Papi based on ESPN's mid-game interview, then joe girardi should be fired. Papi overreacted, end of story. Edes had every right to write a column about someone who blanketly blames the media for something occuring on the field. It was girardi who was upset with Papi's bat flap, he started it. It was girardi who took offense to Beckett hitting 2 guys, even though it appeared his pitches got away from him. Just like when the umpires overreact at a supposed HBP war. Big Papi got hit, he cried like a baby after the game (very un-Papi like), and Edes called him on it. I don't see anything wrong with Edes explaining WHY it was not the media's fault that he got plunked.

     
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    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    Whether it's sports or politics, the pres nd tv and radio reporters get asomewhat snipped when they are called out. The columnists and commentators are fair game because they are spewing opinion,,not just facts, and they are oftenn wrong in their opinions.(Aren't we all?). Surely thenoise coming from the NY media wasworking on the yankees who were being plunked, not on purpose, by the Sox staff the whole series. I don't think i have seen anything resembling the rancor between the two teams in the past  Lets face it, except for a certain pussyness among Belichek and his boys,, Boston teams own NYC these days.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    My response to sportswriters - and fans - is "leave these poor guys alone".  Yeah yeah, they're paid millions, I geddit.  But they are judged so harshly, screamed at when they "fail", harassed in public (not intentionally, but if someone interrupts me at dinner with my family I'm often ruder than I should and want to be)...and are often judged as if they are 30-40 year olds rather than guys whose mates are still living at home with their parents.

    When Byung-Hung Kim gave the finger to a Fenway crowd?  Who cares, big deal, the howling jackals screaming at him deserved much worse.  The guy was in the MFL at 20, a high achiever at age 22/23/24.  Started having problems....then given such sh*t....by people (morons) that didn't understand that in his culture drooling, hateful morons were from another country (geddit?)...etc.

    Nah, I'm an idjit, don't understand, demonise.  228 countries, 227 are bad ones...that's the ticket!
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from betterredthandead. Show betterredthandead's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    soups, thank you for your very generous comment.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from betterredthandead. Show betterredthandead's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    Big Papi got hit, he cried like a baby after the game (very un-Papi like), and Edes called him on it. I don't see anything wrong with Edes explaining WHY it was not the media's fault that he got plunked

    No, Ortiz didn't "cry like a baby after the game". Edes didn't call him on anything but handing it to the ratings driven press for writing nonsense about the Yankees needing to plunk someone for flipping a bat, for never having hit Ortiz, for settling the score on Yankee hitters getting hit. It wasn't about ESPN saying something and a few innings later the Yankees did what ESPN asked them to do. It was about a media, in addition to ESPN, that had been droning about this for the entire series. It was a one sided series for a media that is ratings driven and is a daily publicity stunt seeker.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from carnie. Show carnie's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    I think that's the most astute thing I've ever heard from you softy.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    "Captious drivel"?  Red, Red, Red, my (possibly muslim, probably gay, certainly liberal) man!  Your brave attempt at mocking TIS (That Idiot Softlaw) will never find any traction if you only focus on his repetetive use of under-utilised-for-a-reason 19th century words.

    Why do you think TIS gave up his embarrassing membership here, btw?

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from betterredthandead. Show betterredthandead's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    Inchoherent stalking Piker, I want you to describe to me what is "gay".
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: What do you think of Gordon Edes's response to David Ortiz?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay
     
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