WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    As I am a Septuagenarian and have been a Sox fan all my life and I am a former Marine & Williams was one of my heroes as a ballplayer and a Marine, I believe you Sox fans will enjoy this.

    Semper Fi !!!

     

    "Colonel Jerry Cadick’s recounting of some of his “ejection” experiences reminds me of a story about Ted Williams that John McCain told a group of us one New Hampshire day aboard the “Straight Talk Express.” McCain, a Boston Red Sox fan and (of course) an ex-fighter pilot, greatly admired Williams, who served as a fighter pilot in two wars.

    During a mission in North Korea, Williams’ fighter plane was crippled by a strike that knocked out its hydraulics and electrical systems. The plane already was on fire when an explosion rocked its undercarriage as it approached the landing strip.

    Williams pulled off a wheels-up “belly” landing, skidding along the tarmac with sparks flying for almost a mile before coming to a stop. The nose burst into flames, threatening the cockpit. Williams blew off the canopy, struggled out of the plane, and, after limping clear of it, hit the ground.

    He received the Air Medal.

    McCain once asked Williams about the incident. Why, McCain wondered, didn’t Williams eject rather than attempting such a dangerous landing?

    Williams explained that, at six feet three inches tall, he believed he would have blown out both knees had he ejected himself from the cramped cockpit. And that would have meant the end of his baseball-playing career. Therefore, he decided he had to land the plane.

    At age 33, and married with a child, Williams probably shouldn’t have been called up for the Korean War; nor was he happy about the call-up. Yet, although he hadn’t flown any aircraft for eight years, he turned down opportunities to avoid combat by playing on a service baseball team. Instead it was off to Korea to fly combat missions.

    Williams would later say that the Marines he encountered in Korea “were the greatest guys I ever met.” One of those guys, future astronaut John Glenn, described Williams as one of the best pilots he knew.

    Ted Williams: an American original."

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    great story Sf! Ty

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

    As I am a Septuagenarian and have been a Sox fan all my life and I am a former Marine & Williams was one of my heroes as a ballplayer and a Marine, I believe you Sox fans will enjoy this.

    "Colonel Jerry Cadick’s recounting of some of his “ejection” experiences reminds me of a story about Ted Williams that John McCain told a group of us one New Hampshire day aboard the “Straight Talk Express.” McCain, a Boston Red Sox fan and (of course) an ex-fighter pilot, greatly admired Williams, who served as a fighter pilot in two wars.

    During a mission in North Korea, Williams’ fighter plane was crippled by a strike that knocked out its hydraulics and electrical systems. The plane already was on fire when an explosion rocked its undercarriage as it approached the landing strip.

    Williams pulled off a wheels-up “belly” landing, skidding along the tarmac with sparks flying for almost a mile before coming to a stop. The nose burst into flames, threatening the cockpit. Williams blew off the canopy, struggled out of the plane, and, after limping clear of it, hit the ground.

    He received the Air Medal.

    McCain once asked Williams about the incident. Why, McCain wondered, didn’t Williams eject rather than attempting such a dangerous landing?

    Williams explained that, at six feet three inches tall, he believed he would have blown out both knees had he ejected himself from the cramped cockpit. And that would have meant the end of his baseball-playing career. Therefore, he decided he had to land the plane.

    At age 33, and married with a child, Williams probably shouldn’t have been called up for the Korean War; nor was he happy about the call-up. Yet, although he hadn’t flown any aircraft for eight years, he turned down opportunities to avoid combat by playing on a service baseball team. Instead it was off to Korea to fly combat missions.

    Williams would later say that the Marines he encountered in Korea “were the greatest guys I ever met.” One of those guys, future astronaut John Glenn, described Williams as one of the best pilots he knew.

    Ted Williams: an American original."


    Thank you very much......  Great story......  Can we all imagine what Ted would have done with those 5 prime years when he wasn't fighting for the USA........  As my MOM used to say...............  "Teddy could put his shoes under her bed anytime"  !!!!

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ampoule. Show ampoule's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    A true American hero...

    And, I cherish the letter I got from him when I was 12 yrs. old.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThatWasMe. Show ThatWasMe's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    And quite a flyfisherman too.

    Ted was a rare breed he could do anything well he put his mind to.

     
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  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

    As I am a Septuagenarian and have been a Sox fan all my life and I am a former Marine & Williams was one of my heroes as a ballplayer and a Marine, I believe you Sox fans will enjoy this.

    Semper Fi !!!

     

    "Colonel Jerry Cadick’s recounting of some of his “ejection” experiences reminds me of a story about Ted Williams that John McCain told a group of us one New Hampshire day aboard the “Straight Talk Express.” McCain, a Boston Red Sox fan and (of course) an ex-fighter pilot, greatly admired Williams, who served as a fighter pilot in two wars.

    During a mission in North Korea, Williams’ fighter plane was crippled by a strike that knocked out its hydraulics and electrical systems. The plane already was on fire when an explosion rocked its undercarriage as it approached the landing strip.

    Williams pulled off a wheels-up “belly” landing, skidding along the tarmac with sparks flying for almost a mile before coming to a stop. The nose burst into flames, threatening the cockpit. Williams blew off the canopy, struggled out of the plane, and, after limping clear of it, hit the ground.

    He received the Air Medal.

    McCain once asked Williams about the incident. Why, McCain wondered, didn’t Williams eject rather than attempting such a dangerous landing?

    Williams explained that, at six feet three inches tall, he believed he would have blown out both knees had he ejected himself from the cramped cockpit. And that would have meant the end of his baseball-playing career. Therefore, he decided he had to land the plane.

    At age 33, and married with a child, Williams probably shouldn’t have been called up for the Korean War; nor was he happy about the call-up. Yet, although he hadn’t flown any aircraft for eight years, he turned down opportunities to avoid combat by playing on a service baseball team. Instead it was off to Korea to fly combat missions.

    Williams would later say that the Marines he encountered in Korea “were the greatest guys I ever met.” One of those guys, future astronaut John Glenn, described Williams as one of the best pilots he knew.

    Ted Williams: an American original."



    This was discussed, in even greater detail, in the great TW bio by Leigh Montville; if you haven't read it, go get it.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from stan17. Show stan17's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    Great story about a true American hero.

     
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  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    An American icon.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    In response to mryazz's comment:

    In response to Bill-806's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

     

    As I am a Septuagenarian and have been a Sox fan all my life and I am a former Marine & Williams was one of my heroes as a ballplayer and a Marine, I believe you Sox fans will enjoy this.

    "Colonel Jerry Cadick’s recounting of some of his “ejection” experiences reminds me of a story about Ted Williams that John McCain told a group of us one New Hampshire day aboard the “Straight Talk Express.” McCain, a Boston Red Sox fan and (of course) an ex-fighter pilot, greatly admired Williams, who served as a fighter pilot in two wars.

    During a mission in North Korea, Williams’ fighter plane was crippled by a strike that knocked out its hydraulics and electrical systems. The plane already was on fire when an explosion rocked its undercarriage as it approached the landing strip.

    Williams pulled off a wheels-up “belly” landing, skidding along the tarmac with sparks flying for almost a mile before coming to a stop. The nose burst into flames, threatening the cockpit. Williams blew off the canopy, struggled out of the plane, and, after limping clear of it, hit the ground.

    He received the Air Medal.

    McCain once asked Williams about the incident. Why, McCain wondered, didn’t Williams eject rather than attempting such a dangerous landing?

    Williams explained that, at six feet three inches tall, he believed he would have blown out both knees had he ejected himself from the cramped cockpit. And that would have meant the end of his baseball-playing career. Therefore, he decided he had to land the plane.

    At age 33, and married with a child, Williams probably shouldn’t have been called up for the Korean War; nor was he happy about the call-up. Yet, although he hadn’t flown any aircraft for eight years, he turned down opportunities to avoid combat by playing on a service baseball team. Instead it was off to Korea to fly combat missions.

    Williams would later say that the Marines he encountered in Korea “were the greatest guys I ever met.” One of those guys, future astronaut John Glenn, described Williams as one of the best pilots he knew.

    Ted Williams: an American original."

     


    Thank you very much......  Great story......  Can we all imagine what Ted would have done with those 5 prime years when he wasn't fighting for the USA........  As my MOM used to say...............  "Teddy could put his shoes under her bed anytime"  !!!!

     

     



    where was DAD???????

     

    [/QUOTE]   I think that it was "a figure of speech"  !!!


     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    I don't think there are too many posters in here that actually got to see Ted play. I was 12 when my dad took me to a game and saw him play and also hit a home run. quite a few years ago I gave my dad a home white game shirt with #9 on the back. Since I lost my dad two years ago that shirt now hangs in my closet and I sometimes wear it to work on casual fridays. I have and always will have two hero's in my life. my dad is number 1 and teddy ballgame is number 2.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    Gang, I've always been a huge Ted Williams fan, but, while I love the story and believe every bit of it, I don't see Ted Williams as nearly as heroic as John Glenn or John McCain.  One of the reasons Williams was called back for the Korean War was because he didn't go overseas during WW II but stayed back as a very capable flight instructor.  As for the not bailing out thing, that just shows the guy was smart and always thinking.  He was later a pretty good manager, all things considered.  And, truly, an American original. 

    John McCain was the real deal, an authentic hero despite being the son of a four-star admiral.  Pretty rare.  And a pretty good Senator to boot. 

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from ampoule. Show ampoule's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

     

    Gang, I've always been a huge Ted Williams fan, but, while I love the story and believe every bit of it, I don't see Ted Williams as nearly as heroic as John Glenn or John McCain.  One of the reasons Williams was called back for the Korean War was because he didn't go overseas during WW II but stayed back as a very capable flight instructor.  As for the not bailing out thing, that just shows the guy was smart and always thinking.  He was later a pretty good manager, all things considered.  And, truly, an American original. 

    John McCain was the real deal, an authentic hero despite being the son of a four-star admiral.  Pretty rare.  And a pretty good Senator to boot. 

     




     

    Yes, and refused the opportunity to be released by the gooks so as not to be used as a propoganda piece.

     
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  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    In response to mryazz's comment:

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

     

    Gang, I've always been a huge Ted Williams fan, but, while I love the story and believe every bit of it, I don't see Ted Williams as nearly as heroic as John Glenn or John McCain.  One of the reasons Williams was called back for the Korean War was because he didn't go overseas during WW II but stayed back as a very capable flight instructor.  As for the not bailing out thing, that just shows the guy was smart and always thinking.  He was later a pretty good manager, all things considered.  And, truly, an American original. 

    John McCain was the real deal, an authentic hero despite being the son of a four-star admiral.  Pretty rare.  And a pretty good Senator to boot. 

     




     

    mccain is a war monger and completely out of touch with the problems america faces today.


    oh really? please feel free to enlighten me/us with your actual facts to back up your statement.

     
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  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: WHEN TED WILLIAMS DIDN’T EJECT

    In response to mryazz's comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to mryazz's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

     

    Gang, I've always been a huge Ted Williams fan, but, while I love the story and believe every bit of it, I don't see Ted Williams as nearly as heroic as John Glenn or John McCain.  One of the reasons Williams was called back for the Korean War was because he didn't go overseas during WW II but stayed back as a very capable flight instructor.  As for the not bailing out thing, that just shows the guy was smart and always thinking.  He was later a pretty good manager, all things considered.  And, truly, an American original. 

    John McCain was the real deal, an authentic hero despite being the son of a four-star admiral.  Pretty rare.  And a pretty good Senator to boot. 

     




     

    mccain is a war monger and completely out of touch with the problems america faces today.

     

     


    oh really? please feel free to enlighten me/us with your actual facts to back up your statement.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    who's us? the right wing-nut brigade? 

     

    [/QUOTE]

    nothing of the kind kid. maybe you can enlighten me as to why Sen. McCain is in your opinion a "war monger"

     

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