Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

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    Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    By Kirk Minihane/WEEI:
    Unless you count the inevitable failed comeback attempt next season (I'll set the over/under at 3.5 starts and take the under), it's over. 

    Turns out Daisuke Matsuzaka didn't throw 100 MPH. We can put the gyroball on the list of things we are still waiting to see in Boston sports, along with Rick Pitino's final press conference and Drew Bledsoe's chance to compete for "his job" as starting QB of the Patriots.

    The Matsuzaka signing can't be looked at as anything close to a success, but to call it a complete wipeout wouldn't exactly be fair, either. There were some good moments -- think 18-3 in 2008, two playoff wins in 2007, the occasional starts where he really looked like the guy we were told we were getting in December 2006 (the near no-hitter vs. the Phillies last year as a perfect example) -- but those will be simply swallowed by the blizzard of blown leads (and raise your hand if you'll miss Don Orsillo telling us that "Dice-K is at 62 pitches through two innings") and injuries and failure to get on board with the organization. 

    Ultimately? A miss. But that doesn't mean we can't take a closer look at the winners and losers from Dice-K's Red Sox tenure ...

    WINNER: Scott Boras

    Maybe not his greatest heist -- this is a guy, after all, that got the Texas Rangers to pay Alex Rodriguez $252 million by essentially bidding against the Texas Rangers -- but I'm pretty sure Matsuzaka is happy with the $52 million contract right about now. You look back at the whole "Will We Or Won't We Get This Guy?" drama from five years ago, and it's almost amazing to see how smoothly Boras played his character. Sure, he pissed the Sox off at times -- "We're on Scott Boras' doorstep because he hasn't negotiated with us thus far," John Henry said when ownership made the trip to the West Coast to try and finalize the deal -- but that's part of the job, of course. The bottom line is Boras got the Sox to cough up $52 million for a pitcher (plus another $51 mil for posting) with nothing close to a track record in the major leagues. 

    LOSER: Scott Boras

    He thought landing Dice-K would be the start of a bridge to Japanese players that in fact never materialized. And whatever it's worth, the Matsuzaka/Boras relationship is now strained at best. I suspect, however, that Boras still probably views the whole ordeal as a winner (and I'm not buying that he hurt his relationship with the Sox in the process -- if a player is really good and the Sox think he'll help them win they'll go after him if he's a Boras client or not. You think if Jacoby Ellsbury keeps playing like this the Sox'll let him walk because of Boras? Come on.)

    WINNER: Seibu Lions

    Think about it: They got eight terrific years out of Matsuzaka (108-60 record, 2.95 ERA, Rookie of the Year in 1999, The Pacific League version of the Cy Young in 2001) and then sold him for $51.1 million. OK, they might've missed out on those first two productive years, but does anyone think these injuries would have been prevented if he had stayed in Japan and kept churning out 160-pitch starts? Nope, they got the best of Dice-K and then got paid $51 million to let him go somewhere else and suffer arm fatigue and hip injuries and a Tommy John surgery. There is no comparison to that in any other field. If the old studio system still existed in movies and MGM paid Sony $51 million for the rights to Tara Reid in 2001 we might be getting close.

    LOSER: Hyperbole

    "Publicly, the Red Sox are trying to walk a precarious line between cashing in on the excitement of his arrival and tempering expectations. Privately, they believe he can have as big an impact as two-time Cy Young Award winner Johan Santana has had in Minnesota. On those magic nights when Matsuzaka has all of his pitches working, the Sox envision 15-strikeout games." 

    -- Tom Verducci

    Verducci (who wrote the cover story of the 2007 SI Baseball Preview on Dice K titled Fever Pitch: Why Daisuke Matsuzaka is Worthy and What America Will Learn From Him) is just one of about three million journalists who fell all over themselves to try to explain to us how Matsuzaka -- with his eight different pitches and Balboa in Russia workout routine and his endless pride -- was going to change how we looked at pitching. At the time we all just kind of nodded and kept drinking the Kool-Aid being served by the Sox to the media to us. 
    WINNER: That Guy Who Only Defines Success As Winning a World Series, No Matter The Cost

    Well, Dice-K contributed to a World Series winner. No question about it. He won 15 games in the regular season and two more in the postseason, including Game 7 of the ALCS. So that happened, sure. But I have to think that the Sox -- who won 96 games, the AL East by two games and were a full eight games ahead of the wild-card runner up Mariners -- would have figured out a way to get to the postseason without Matsuzaka and his 4.40 ERA (28th in the AL that season). And Matsuzaka average at best in that postseason, pitching into the sixth inning once in four starts. His career postseason ERA is 4.79, which isn't exactly going to get you a seat at the John Smoltz/Curt Schilling/Bob Gibson table. He helped, no question. But put a Paul Byrd type in the same spot for a fifth the price and is the end result any different?

    WINNER: The Cautionary Tale

    One more excerpt from the Verducci (who I think is one of the best baseball writers alive) 2007 SI story:

    He didn't ice after he threw 103 pitches in the bullpen the second time he stepped on a mound in spring training in 2007, more than twice the number of even the heartiest of his fellow Red Sox pitchers. He didn't ice after one of his twice-weekly 20-minute long-toss sessions, when he throws from the rightfield foul pole to the leftfield wall -- a distance of about 300 feet -- while taking only one step to load his arm. (Most pitchers throw half that distance.) In past years with the Seibu Lions, he wouldn't ice even after his frequent 300-pitch bullpen sessions, a program that would have been grounds for dismissal for any major league pitching coach who allowed it.

    Reflect on the 250 pitches he threw in a 17-inning complete game in high school -- the apex of a stretch in which he threw 54 innings in 11 days -- and the 189 pitches he threw on Opening Day in 2003, the 160 pitches in his second start of the '05 season, the 145 pitches in his penultimate start for the Lions, the 588 innings he threw for Seibu before he turned 21 (Oakland ace Rich Harden, 25, still hasn't logged that many big league innings) and the eight games last year in which he threw at least 130 pitches -- more such games than all major league pitchers combined.

    Uh, isn't the above paragraph the exact reason why you don't spend $103 million on a pitcher? I don't pretend to have a clue -- and I'll admit I don't much care -- about how much the Dice-K signing meant to the Sox in terms of T-shirt sales and TV rights and business in Japan. But if you were able to look at Matsuzaka as just a pitcher in 2007 (and I don't know if the Sox could or did) there were plenty of red flags. I can't believe a bunch of really smart guys sat in a room and thought that Matsuzaka was different because of something called doryoku. Could be I'm giving too much credit here, but someone -- be it Theo or someone else -- had to stand up at one point during the process and say, "Hey, we all know the odds are staggeringly in favor of this guy getting hurt a lot in the next six years, right?" 

    LOSER: Class of 2007

    That would be $206 million spent on Matsuzaka, Julio Lugo and J.D. Drew. Two thoughts: A) Yup, signing J.D. Drew to a $70 million contract is the gold standard in this group and B) Lugo's .219/.278/.267 line with the Dodgers in 2006 might've been reason for pause before giving him $36 million. But hey, without Lugo the Sox would have never been able to trade for Chris Duncan.

    WINNER: World Baseball Classic

    Any doubt who the 2013 MVP of the WBC is going to be? Dice-K is the Christy Mathewson of the WBC, I'm expecting a 1.26 ERA, four wins and a flurry of 98 MPH fastballs as he leads Japan to the gold medal in Israel. If you think about it less from a Red Sox perspective and more from a global baseball angle, it's really been a remarkably successful five years for Matsuzaka. And isn't that what it's all about?

     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    Stilted and poorly written commentary.
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    The bit about the Seibu Lions is very very interesting. It seems to me that 160 pitch counts did a lot of harm. Tazawa forgoing NPB and heading to America is going to be an interesting test case.
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    WBC 2013 should be interesting.
    I always like Dice, but man how frustrating. He could really do it some nights but others he seemed disinterested. I wish him well.
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]Stilted and poorly written commentary.
    Posted by SoxSoldRed[/QUOTE]
    Agreed. It reads like slapdash speech written down.  

     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]The bit about the Seibu Lions is very very interesting. It seems to me that 160 pitch counts did a lot of harm. Tazawa forgoing NPB and heading to America is going to be an interesting test case.
    Posted by BosoxJoe5[/QUOTE]The 2009 WBC did not do a lot of good for pitchers either. Oswalt was bad all year, Peavy was horrible that year, needed surgery the next and then there is Dice K who bounced back and forth on the DL until his elbow tendon finally gave up the ghost.

    I know that it is MLB's baby to help develop a word -wide interest and larger talent pool but it is hard on pitchers to have them work so early into the year that hard and that long.

    This guy's take was just kicking metaphorical sand in the face while the target is down. 
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    In Response to Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]By Kirk Minihane/WEEI: Unless you count the inevitable failed comeback attempt next season (I'll set the over/under at 3.5 starts and take the under), it's over.  Turns out  Daisuke Matsuzaka  didn't throw 100 MPH. We can put the gyroball on the list of things we are still waiting to see in Boston sports, along with Rick Pitino's final press conference and Drew Bledsoe's chance to compete for "his job" as starting QB of the Patriots. The Matsuzaka signing can't be looked at as anything close to a success, but to call it a complete wipeout wouldn't exactly be fair, either. There were some good moments -- think 18-3 in 2008, two playoff wins in 2007, the occasional starts where he really looked like the guy we were told we were getting in December 2006 (the near no-hitter vs. the Phillies last year as a perfect example) -- but those will be simply swallowed by the blizzard of blown leads (and raise your hand if you'll miss Don Orsillo telling us that "Dice-K is at 62 pitches through two innings") and injuries and failure to get on board with the organization.  Ultimately? A miss. But that doesn't mean we can't take a closer look at the winners and losers from Dice-K's Red Sox tenure ... WINNER: Scott Boras Maybe not his greatest heist -- this is a guy, after all, that got the Texas Rangers to pay Alex Rodriguez $252 million by essentially bidding against the Texas Rangers -- but I'm pretty sure Matsuzaka is happy with the $52 million contract right about now. You look back at the whole "Will We Or Won't We Get This Guy?" drama from five years ago, and it's almost amazing to see how smoothly Boras played his character. Sure, he pissed the Sox off at times -- "We're on Scott Boras' doorstep because he hasn't negotiated with us thus far," John Henry said when ownership made the trip to the West Coast to try and finalize the deal -- but that's part of the job, of course. The bottom line is Boras got the Sox to cough up $52 million for a pitcher (plus another $51 mil for posting) with nothing close to a track record in the major leagues.  LOSER: Scott Boras He thought landing Dice-K would be the start of a bridge to Japanese players that in fact never materialized. And whatever it's worth, the Matsuzaka/Boras relationship is now strained at best. I suspect, however, that Boras still probably views the whole ordeal as a winner (and I'm not buying that he hurt his relationship with the Sox in the process -- if a player is really good and the Sox think he'll help them win they'll go after him if he's a Boras client or not. You think if Jacoby Ellsbury keeps playing like this the Sox'll let him walk because of Boras? Come on.) WINNER: Seibu Lions Think about it: They got eight terrific years out of Matsuzaka (108-60 record, 2.95 ERA, Rookie of the Year in 1999, The Pacific League version of the Cy Young in 2001) and then sold him for $51.1 million. OK, they might've missed out on those first two productive years, but does anyone think these injuries would have been  prevented  if he had stayed in Japan and kept churning out 160-pitch starts? Nope, they got the best of Dice-K and then got paid $51 million to let him go somewhere else and suffer arm fatigue and hip injuries and a Tommy John surgery. There is no comparison to that in any other field. If the old studio system still existed in movies and MGM paid Sony $51 million for the rights to Tara Reid in 2001 we might be getting close. LOSER: Hyperbole "Publicly, the Red Sox are trying to walk a precarious line between cashing in on the excitement of his arrival and tempering expectations. Privately, they believe he can have as big an impact as two-time Cy Young Award winner Johan Santana has had in Minnesota. On those magic nights when Matsuzaka has all of his pitches working, the Sox envision 15-strikeout games."  -- Tom Verducci Verducci (who wrote the cover story of the 2007 SI Baseball Preview on Dice K titled Fever Pitch: Why Daisuke Matsuzaka is Worthy and What America Will Learn From Him ) is just one of about three million journalists who fell all over themselves to try to explain to us how Matsuzaka -- with his eight different pitches and Balboa in Russia workout routine and his endless pride -- was going to change how we looked at pitching. At the time we all just kind of nodded and kept drinking the Kool-Aid being served by the Sox to the media to us.  WINNER: That Guy Who Only Defines Success As Winning a World Series , No Matter The Cost Well, Dice-K contributed to a World Series winner. No question about it. He won 15 games in the regular season and two more in the postseason, including Game 7 of the ALCS. So that happened, sure. But I have to think that the Sox -- who won 96 games, the AL East by two games and were a full eight games ahead of the wild-card runner up Mariners -- would have figured out a way to get to the postseason without Matsuzaka and his 4.40 ERA (28th in the AL that season). And Matsuzaka average at best in that postseason, pitching into the sixth inning once in four starts. His career postseason ERA is 4.79, which isn't exactly going to get you a seat at the John Smoltz / Curt Schilling /Bob Gibson table. He helped, no question. But put a Paul Byrd type in the same spot for a fifth the price and is the end result any different? WINNER: The Cautionary Tale One more excerpt from the Verducci (who I think is one of the best baseball writers alive) 2007 SI story: He didn't ice after he threw 103 pitches in the bullpen the second time he stepped on a mound in spring training in 2007, more than twice the number of even the heartiest of his fellow Red Sox pitchers. He didn't ice after one of his twice-weekly 20-minute long-toss sessions, when he throws from the rightfield foul pole to the leftfield wall -- a distance of about 300 feet -- while taking only one step to load his arm. (Most pitchers throw half that distance.) In past years with the Seibu Lions, he wouldn't ice even after his frequent 300-pitch bullpen sessions, a program that would have been grounds for dismissal for any major league pitching coach who allowed it. Reflect on the 250 pitches he threw in a 17-inning complete game in high school -- the apex of a stretch in which he threw 54 innings in 11 days -- and the 189 pitches he threw on Opening Day in 2003, the 160 pitches in his second start of the '05 season, the 145 pitches in his penultimate start for the Lions, the 588 innings he threw for Seibu before he turned 21 (Oakland ace Rich Harden , 25, still hasn't logged that many big league innings) and the eight games last year in which he threw at least 130 pitches -- more such games than all major league pitchers combined. Uh, isn't the above paragraph the exact reason why you don't spend $103 million on a pitcher? I don't pretend to have a clue -- and I'll admit I don't much care -- about how much the Dice-K signing meant to the Sox in terms of T-shirt sales and TV rights and business in Japan. But if you were able to look at Matsuzaka as just a pitcher in 2007 (and I don't know if the Sox could or did) there were plenty of red flags. I can't believe a bunch of really smart guys sat in a room and thought that Matsuzaka was different because of something called doryoku . Could be I'm giving too much credit here, but someone -- be it Theo or someone else -- had to stand up at one point during the process and say, "Hey, we all know the odds are staggeringly in favor of this guy getting hurt a lot in the next six years, right?"  LOSER: Class of 2007 That would be $206 million spent on Matsuzaka, Julio Lugo and J.D. Drew. Two thoughts: A) Yup, signing J.D. Drew to a $70 million contract is the gold standard in this group and B) Lugo's .219/.278/.267 line with the Dodgers in 2006 might've been reason for pause before giving him $36 million. But hey, without Lugo the Sox would have never been able to trade for Chris Duncan. WINNER: World Baseball Classic Any doubt who the 2013 MVP of the WBC is going to be? Dice-K is the Christy Mathewson of the WBC, I'm expecting a 1.26 ERA, four wins and a flurry of 98 MPH fastballs as he leads Japan to the gold medal in Israel. If you think about it less from a Red Sox perspective and more from a global baseball angle, it's really been a remarkably successful five years for Matsuzaka. And isn't that what it's all about?
    Posted by Mr.Bump[/QUOTE]   GREAT POST....  EVEN THE T-BALLERS SHOULD UNDERSTAND !!!!  WHAT A WASTE OF TIME & MONEY !!!
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era : The 2009 WBC did not do a lot of good for pitchers either. Oswalt was bad all year, Peavy was horrible that year, needed surgery the next and then there is Dice K who bounced back and forth on the DL until his elbow tendon finally gave up the ghost. I know that it is MLB's baby to help develop a word -wide interest and larger talent pool but it is hard on pitchers to have them work so early into the year that hard and that long. This guy's take was just kicking metaphorical sand in the face while the target is down. 
    Posted by fivekatz[/QUOTE]
    The WBC aside, in Japan you have High School throwing complete extra inning games. It is a bit absurb.
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    Winners:

    Red Sox Fans who appreciated another world series ring. 

    Red Sox Fans who are lucky to have a big market team that can afford to take a huge financial investment on a pitcher that pans out only to a point. 

    Losers: 

    anti-Japanese bigots

    those who like to see pitchers that go right after batters instead of perpetually nibbling.

    those who like to see pitchers who don't wait till they have a runner on first and second to pitch well. 

    Softy, who has staked a fair amount of his forum credibility on DiceK being a better value that Wake. Tommy John = whoops! Thanks for playing.


     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    Winners are obviously the player with his money and his extraordinary perks, his agent, his former team and Hideki Okajima who would never have pitched an inning in the major leagues were it not for his being in the right place at the right time and the Red Sox for choosing him to be Dice K's binky .  The media always wins whenever there is obvious controversy and they had a wonderful opportunity to create it with this player. 

    Losers are the Red Sox GM and his staff who believed they had signed a "treasure" and "can't miss" pitcher, vastly overbid for the privilege of negotiating with him, Red Sox fans who actually believed the hype, bought jerseys with his name and number and overpaid for tickets to watch him labor through 5 or 6 innings time and time again and waited and waited to see the outstanding pitcher they were told that he would be. 
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era :    GREAT POST....  EVEN THE T-BALLERS SHOULD UNDERSTAND !!!!  WHAT A WASTE OF TIME & MONEY !!!
    Posted by Bill-806[/QUOTE]
    You mean like the 23million in debt the Republicans have accumulated trying to get into the White House? Why don't you tell your friend Palin to conserve her breath since she doesn't even know who or what Paul Revere did.

    I like the liberal idea Theo had by taking a shot with Dice-K, but should have thought more conservatively with the signing of Lackey. That's a waste of time and money right there, at least Dice-K opened the Japanese market more to the Sox and brought in more fans for revenue.

    Winner - Sox fans, got to enjoy a great 07 playoff performance and clutch hit by Dice-K, not to mention the WS he helped us win.
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]Tazawa forgoing NPB and heading to America is going to be an interesting test case.
    Posted by BosoxJoe5[/QUOTE]

    If he didn't have TJ already I think he certainly could have been an interesting case.  What would NPB have done to him health wise that didn't end up happening here though?  
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    freediro, the Democrats have a bigger problem with a guy who thinks there are 59 United States and that a corpsman is a corpseman. You also have the face of your Congressional Party sending pictures of his bulge and then lying about it, repeatedly. He only admitted it because he got caught, the 6th time, by women coming foward to confront this cyber sexual stalker who admitted he had no  idea how old the people he was talking to were. He didn't care, of course, because he didn't think he'd ever get caught. Don't be a Weiner.

    Also, the old pandering Democrat playbook of "something for nothing" and "haters" isn't going to have much more mileage in this economy and with the current debt and deficit. Talks about "hope and change" in 2008 isn't going to sell the second time in the liars box.
     
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    What, no cheap shots at the Yankees about Igawa?  Disappointing. 
     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era

    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era : If he didn't have TJ already I think he certainly could have been an interesting case.  What would NPB have done to him health wise that didn't end up happening here though?  
    Posted by JB-3[/QUOTE]
    I think the difference is the pitch counts and pitching every 5 days instead of every week. MLB is very careful with young pitchers, NPB is not.
     
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    "I think the difference is the pitch counts and pitching every 5 days instead of every week. MLB is very careful with young pitchers, NPB is not"

    Is the incidence of UCL tears for pitchers in Japan higher than it is in the US?

    I don't know the typical age of when a pitcher tears his UCL, but Dice-K is 30.  He pitched several years in the US before tearing his UCL.  One could make the case that it was the Red Sox that messed up his arm.  One could make the case that it was the Red Sox training regiment that weakened his arm and led to the UCL. 

    I'm not saying it's the Red Sox fault, but there is just as much proof for the Red Sox being at fault than the entire Japanese professional baseball league.

    I think game pitch counts goes out the door with Dice-K.  He hasn't pitched in that many games for the Red Sox over the past few years.

    I think it was the WBC.  He hasn't been the same since then.
     
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    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]"One could make the case that it was the Red Sox that messed up his arm.  One could make the case that it was the Red Sox training regiment that weakened his arm and led to the UCL.
    Posted by DirtyWaterLover[/QUOTE]

    That's an awfully tough sell considering Dice refused to follow the Sox training regiment.
     
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    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era : I think the difference is the pitch counts and pitching every 5 days instead of every week. MLB is very careful with young pitchers, NPB is not.
    Posted by BosoxJoe5[/QUOTE]

    And yet Tazawa was hurt at a young age after bypassing NPB.  I just think a better test case would be a pitcher bypassing NPB who didn't tear his UCL early in his MLB career.  Not that he can't overcome the injury, but there's an extra degree of difficulty that makes it a non-representative example.
     
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    BIGGEST LOSER ON THIS BOARD????


    SoldRed!

    Looks like his race baiting comments finally caught up with him????

    Any guesses at what his next incarnation will be???
     
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    In Response to Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era:
    [QUOTE]"I think the difference is the pitch counts and pitching every 5 days instead of every week. MLB is very careful with young pitchers, NPB is not" Is the incidence of UCL tears for pitchers in Japan higher than it is in the US? I don't know the typical age of when a pitcher tears his UCL, but Dice-K is 30.  He pitched several years in the US before tearing his UCL.  One could make the case that it was the Red Sox that messed up his arm.  One could make the case that it was the Red Sox training regiment that weakened his arm and led to the UCL.  I'm not saying it's the Red Sox fault, but there is just as much proof for the Red Sox being at fault than the entire Japanese professional baseball league. I think game pitch counts goes out the door with Dice-K.  He hasn't pitched in that many games for the Red Sox over the past few years. I think it was the WBC.  He hasn't been the same since then.
    Posted by DirtyWaterLover[/QUOTE]

    Could be Dirty.  The Japanese approach is more like a mid-20th-century American philosophy in which the arm health of a pitcher is tied to a consistent, heavy workload of throwing.  The Sox backed him off this path, though obviously with Daisuke kicking and screaming about it.  So, at the end of the day, it is difficult to determine whether it was the extensive workload in Japan, the change to an approach that weakened him, or, maybe just the inevtiable wear and tear of the violent action that is pitching that sent him to tommy john land.

     
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    Re: Winners and losers from the Daisuke Matsuzaka era


    Who's at fault with regard to Dice-K's injured arm????

    Come on!!!

    I think it is pretty clear that Dice-K's injury stems from overextending himself at the WBC???

    Did he not pull up lame during ST shortly after the WBC???

    His arm was NEVER THE SAME after that!

    Ever since that off season injury, Dice-K started blaming the Red Sox training / strengthening program for HIS PROBLEMS / injuries????

    The most disturbing part????  Dice-K's pattern of dissembling, obfuscation, & changing stories depending upon whether he was talking to the Japanese media or communicating / miscommunicating with RS management or the Boston media.

    THE FINAL STRAW for fans & management was Dice-K telling the Japanese media that he was "injured" during the the 2009? season, WHICH CERTAINLY CAME AS NEWS TO THE ENTIRE RS ORGANIZATION!

    It reminds me of the year Nomar was "injured" during Spring Training, then we find out that it was very likely an injury he sustained during the off season playing soccer?!?!?!?

    Dice-K, like Nomar, has nobody but himself to blame for his problems here in Boston!!!!!
     

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