1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ufcchamp. Show ufcchamp's posts

    Max Kellerman

    Anybody else hear him on 1st Take this morning?
    He said that a big issue in ny today is that 'here's another yankee getting railed'. He mentioned the Mitchell report and how so few RS were in the report when it's SO obvious which RS players were/are juicing and were protected by the Good Gentleman from Maine.
    Who on the Sox is/was OBVIOUSLY juicing? Mo comes to mind, but I think he was in there. Kapler maybe? Nixon? Tek and his tree-trunk legs? Papi because of his power increase?
    I don't think any Sox are OBVIOUS juicers, although some would be less surprising than others.
    I was just surprised by his strong wording, as was the host that was interviewing him...though he did not press the issue.
    On another note...it's good to see he's still alive...after he left Around the Horn I lost track of him.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Micksoxx. Show Micksoxx's posts

    Max Kellerman

    He is a whiny little thing isn't he? It's funny how NY guys like him always talk up their "NY roots" yet seem so insecure about Boston?
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from AL34. Show AL34's posts

    Max Kellerman

    I would suspect Nixon because the club just wanted to break ties with him at the end of 2006. They were not even interested in bringing him back on a minor league contract.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Max Kellerman

    Whoopie!

    Maybe,Trot Nixon,Varitek, Ortiz (only Papi has ever been a serious power threat)...and ....Gabe Kapler?

    4th outfielder that was used mostly in a defensive role.

    Real obvious steroid user.

    I don't think so.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ufcchamp. Show ufcchamp's posts

    Max Kellerman

    I would suspect Nixon because the club just wanted to break ties with him at the end of 2006.

    I think Kapler's 1 year coaching stint may have been a "cleansing period." He was awfully young to call it a career and awfully quick to make a come-back. Didn't he win best physique in MLB or something? He almost seemed too bulky. His swing seemed limited...like on the follow through...kinda like me swinging a golf club with an abrupt ending because my range of motion sucks. He just let go with his top hand as soon as he made contact. I don't know...but I liked his hutspah.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ufcchamp. Show ufcchamp's posts

    Max Kellerman

    4th outfielder that was used mostly in a defensive role.

    Real obvious steroid user.

    I don't think so.


    Perhaps my use of "maybe" and multiple question marks could clue you into the fact that I wasn't making statements.
    Not to mention that if you pay attention, most of those caught have been fringe-players not wanting to give up that MLB life-style for the AAA grind.
     
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  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from chuckhndrsn. Show chuckhndrsn's posts

    Max Kellerman

    softlaw hit the nail on the head! give credit when its due people. he gets trashed often (once by me i believe but it couldve been plain old law), but he is 100% on this one.

     
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  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Max Kellerman

    [Quote]4th outfielder that was used mostly in a defensive role.

    Real obvious steroid user.

    I don't think so.


    Perhaps my use of "maybe" and multiple question marks could clue you into the fact that I wasn't making statements.
    Not to mention that if you pay attention, most of those caught have been fringe-players not wanting to give up that MLB life-style for the AAA grind.
    [/Quote]

    Yes I was paying attention. I wasn't directing the statement at you , but you made referance to the gentleman's statement about OBVIOUS users on the Red Sox.

    The point I am trying to make is Yankees Clemens, Giambi, Sheffield and A-Rod are not "fringe players" But the of RUMORED Red Sox players you indicated, Varitek, Nixon, Ortiz and Kapler only Ortiz seems a to have gotten results. Varitek , Nixon and Kapler were average to poor hitters at best.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from user_1331433. Show user_1331433's posts

    Max Kellerman

    Max Kellerman is a yankee fan-boy nerd. He has often complained about the perceived lack of Red Sox connected to steroids and has even named names of the players whom he feels are on steroids(David Ortiz). What he doesn't tell his audience nowadays was how he was one of these physcho Yankee fans who didn't just brag about the championships his team won, but how they won them. That the Yankees didn't just simply win, they won morally and ethically better than anyone ever has. When "Yankee Records" were being broke by alleged steroid users, Max Kellerman was front and center calling for an * to be placed in the record books. Knowing what we know now about the Yankee teams of the 1990's and who was using steroids, why isn't Max calling for the * to be placed next to those championships. What a Dick!
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ufcchamp. Show ufcchamp's posts

    Max Kellerman

    Varitek , Nixon and Kapler were average to poor hitters at best.

    True....but they are/were ML poor hitters...which is accompanied by a ML paycheck, which is incentive enough. But I just mention these guys because of all the Sox (plus Nomar) these are the ones that came to mind when trying to think of who he could refer to as "obvious." Kapler's body-builder physique, Tek's a rugged, durable catcher, and Trot got pretty thick and his HR spike was '01- '03. For me Kapler was the one I always thought of, and guess where he was from '00-'02......Texas.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Micksoxx. Show Micksoxx's posts

    Max Kellerman

    Max Kellerman. Another one of those "step aside, I'm from the city" idiots. It is his whole act. He is always boasting about all things NY then when the inevitable NY scrutiny occurs he cries "what about Boston." Pansy.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from jimdavis. Show jimdavis's posts

    Max Kellerman

    I actually like Kellerman. He loves the fact that he is from New York (like me) and he loves the fact that he is Gen X. He thinks that gives him a perspective that no one else has. In this instance, he sounds like a total tool. He needs to just accept what has happened and move on. If he continues to cry, he makes himself sound like a bigger toolbox than he already is.

    Max loves to quote Mike Lowell stats that say he is only a Fenway hitter. That was before the 2007 World Series! Haha, doofus!
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Max Kellerman

    Kellerman is an idiot. But that is not the point.

    And I have no doubt Kellerman has his paramoid fantasies that the Sox starting taking steroids as a team right after game 3 of the 2004 ALCS, givng no chance to his immaculate Yankees, who were forced to play the last 4 games with headaches because they dare not take aspirin, as the unfair edge it gave was not sportsmanlike.

    But Kellerman's paranoid rantings aside and baseless accusations aside, does anyone really think no one on the Sox took anything? Besides Manny Alexander?

    There is a reason Yankees, Mets and Orioles dominated the Mitchell Report, and it probably isn't because those three teams had the biggest problems. It's because that is where the sources came from.

    I have no doubt that the Sox are not 99 44/100% pure, and the biggest reason so few were in the report had nothing to do with Mitchell. He just didn't have a good rat in Fenway.

    I don't even want to know the names anymore. The witch hunt has gone beyond idiotic and leapt into tabloid sensationalism. I'm fine with steroid records, since let's face it, maintaining pure records has never been baseball's strongsuit to begin with...
     
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  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from maddog2020. Show maddog2020's posts

    Max Kellerman

    Kellerman should stick to boxing something he actually knows - it is kind of sad to here him and Stephen A. Smith always cry about the yankees - I remember the day the Yankees got Arod - Smith said he was so happy the Yanks stuck it to the sox.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Max Kellerman

    [Quote]
    As good as your earlier paragraph was, this one is terrible. As with the NCAA and track and field, simply vacate the names of the offenders from the record books. It's done all the time. It doesn't have to be perfect, it merely has to send the message that if you get caught you aren't going in the record books. Just because some got away with cheating, it doesn't mean those who were caught get a pass. The right thing to do is release all the names and ban the offenders and wipe them from all the record books, showing vacated just like the NCAA does. Doing the right thing doesn't mean it fixes human flaws, but it does mean there are some standards to restore some level of integrity, even if there are still thosee that slipped through the cracks.

    Home Runs:

    List the number then (Vacant)
    Aaron
    Ruth

    No question but that it sends the right message and is just punishment. Again, not getting caught doesn't justify letting those who do get caught get away with it.[/Quote]


    But that is where baseball gets inconsistent.
    The NCAA record books are altered against penalties that existed concurrent with the offenses. And while titles and records are stripped retroactively, how many are stripped following subsequent rule changes?
    Baseball’s weak steroid policy pre-2003 did leave a lot of room for players to use the drugs legally. There were plenty of fewer banned substances. For example, Mark McGwire’s use of andro in 1997 in frequently cited. In 1997, androstenidine (sp?) was considered legal by MLB, was not classified as a steroid, and was available over the counter at GNC and many other stores. Years later, andro was classified as a steroid, and its public OTC sale was prohibited, and this did add it to the list of banned substances in MLB. So does that mean anyone who used andro previously should have their records stripped, despite their never breaking a rule at the time? The NFL and NCAA were much clearer with their definitions of illegal substances, and did not simply have a “don’t break the law” policy.

    Speaking of the NFL, did they strip any records from their steroid era?

    The reason for this outrage always seems to be connected with the record books. Unlike most of fans, I am not as concerned with baseball’s record books. Let’s face it, their record keeping is sketchy at best. Why does Nolan Ryan have the strikeout record of 383, when Matt Kilroy struck out 513 batters in 1886. Hugh Duffy’s .440 average in 1894 is never cited as a record, but Nap Lajoie’s record a mere 7 years later is ok, despite being .014 less. Meanwhile Cy Young gets credit for the 270 wins pre-1900 to get his total up to 511. Apparently most baseball historians think 1900 is a nice round number to make a cutoff point, except when they don’t want to. Ask Wee Willie Keeler, whose 44-game hitting streak in 1897 is counted. (The logical cutoff is actually 1884, the first season pitchers were allowed to throw overhand, but logic might dictate acknowledging Matt Kilroy.)

    And there are numerous other inconsistencies in baseball’s record keeping, and not all related to turn of the century baseball. I could write an encyclopedia on the numerous rule changes and policies and inconsistencies that make baseball records questionable in many, many circumstances through the last century plus. Suddenly deciding to assign blame to everyone in one singular era and demanding all known names in order to “clean up the records” is a witch hunt. It will never be a complete process. Baseball historians already divide many records into separate eras (Deadball Era, Live Ball Era, Post WW II Era, etc.). At this point, it’s an easier and safer policy to simply acknowledge what has been done, and move on with the new program in place. It ‘s a good thing it doesn’t have to be perfect. It never will be. But right now Public Opinion is a much higher court than anything done by any commission overseeing baseball.

    In fact, how does baseball bother going forward?

    Pharmaceutical technology will always be able to develop new and better substances that enable athletes to compete at higher and higher levels. Today, its steroids and HgH. Tomorrow, there will be something else. How can anyone expect baseball or any sport to keep up, and how do they determine what is acceptable and what isn’t in what could end up being a rapidly evolving science? How can MLB be prepared when some new substance comes out that isn’t banned just yet? If you have a list of banned substances, and Player X uses a new formulation that isn’t banned, is he subject to penalty as well? And if it becomes banned, does he get penalized retroactively, despite never breaking a written rule? I will agree with anyone who posits the ethical argument about any chemical enhancement, but we all know the policy will be bent as far as possible. It’s always the letter and never the spirit of the policy that gets obeyed.

    And what happens 50 years down the road, when some company has perfected Gene Modification or some sort of sci fi procedure that gives a physical advantage to an athlete because it adjusts genetic deficiencies through non-chemical means? As it is, one could argue their have already been numerous dietary and physical training advantages today’s players have over their predecessors. Even something as commonplace as contact lens’ is an unfair performance enhancer that doesn’t transcend history. I think people are oversimplifying the evils of steroids and their impact on the game and its history.

    It’s actually a safer bet that the majority of users are fringe players looking to get an edge to secure a job, like Dan Naulty admitted about his usage. I think we can all agree that A-Rod was not the one named by accident. But no one cares who the other 103 are unless they hit some serious home runs. No one wants to see those names to make sure, say, Rob Ducey wasn’t taking steroids in order to increase his chances of making a 25-man roster. This is all about knocking down idols. They want Sosa, Pujols, and most of all, Bonds.

    (For the record, I chose Rob Ducey completely at random and am in no way implying he ever took steroids.)

    JC Romero tested positive last month, and while he got some press, there was hardly the same uproar. Yet isn’t interesting that Romero was a contributing member of an extremely sound bullpen that carried the Phillies to the 2008 World Series title, yet everyone is concerned with guys like A-Rod, Giambi, Palmeiro, Bonds, and Sosa, who have combined for zero titles to date? Is anyone calling the Phillies 2008 title into question? Or are we all suddenly OK with Romero’s excuse that he thought he was taking a legal supplement, and it was his first time? Ignorance of the law is an acceptable excuse for players who aren’t going to set any records anyway?

    And why does baseball have acceptable levels of cheating by fan standards? Gaylord Perry is in the Hall of Fame and recognized as a 300 game winner, despite being an admitted and remorseless cheater. He even titled his autobiography “The Spitter and Me,” which actually gives the illegal pitch top billing. A lot of people like to argue that doctoring baseballs isn’t the same as taking performance enhancing drugs, but that is tantamount to saying that some levels of cheating are acceptable. Bottom line is Perry broke the rules to get an unfair advantage, just like all cheaters. It’s the definition of the word, and I don’t see a difference. How can anyone justify allowing cheaters like Perry to receive every accolade baseball has to offer, but feel players like Bonds, McGwire, Palmeiro and A-Rod need to be banned, disacknowledged, and in some cases, imprisoned?

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from jaytf25. Show jaytf25's posts

    Max Kellerman

    [Quote]Kellerman should stick to boxing something he actually knows - it is kind of sad to here him and Stephen A. Smith always cry about the yankees - I remember the day the Yankees got Arod - Smith said he was so happy the Yanks stuck it to the sox.[/Quote] Speaking of Screaming A. Smith did anyone see him on ESPN Sunday night? He actually said " I wash A-Rod would a taken steroids in 2004 because my New Yawk Yankees would have anotha world series" I kid you not, word for word. He should stick to basketball, and kellerman to boxing.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Max Kellerman

    My personal observation is to look for a player having a "breakout" period and then falling off the face of the earth due to lingering injuries.
    Mueller
    Nomar
    Damon
    Trot
    Kapler
    Giambi(the brother)
    Scott Williamson
    B Howry
    C Fox
    Merloni (nomars BF)
    Ever wonder why Manny's uni is so baggy? I saw him leaving the clubhouse one day wearing only an underarmour shirt...he is RIPPED! Easily the biggest most defined player on the team, made Kapler look small!
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Lowell4MVP. Show Lowell4MVP's posts

    Max Kellerman

    Kellerman is on one of the few mainstream media members who actually understands statistics and can go beyond AVG/HR/RBI. He understands player value. It's great to hear him routinely school morons like Steve Philips.

    Yes, he can be an absolute Yankee homer at times, but he's been on the mark more often than not.
     
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