What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Stee1e. Show Stee1e's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?


    ...because it's so short.



    Because it's so shawt.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from portfilio. Show portfilio's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?

    About 12 years ago, I met a very elderly lady here in St Paul, MN and immediately recognized her Yankee accent. I spoke with her in front of a couple of other folks and asked where she was from.  She replied she was from "Chamm" Massachusetts. Nobody there ever heard of that town.  I had to explain to the others that what she said was "Chatham".

    My favorite Boston usage would likely be the term "tonic" for soda which is called "pop" in Minnesota.

    As for ''paak yah caah at 'aaverd' yaad'' I do believe folks don't quite talk like that so much anymore.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from deadjoe. Show deadjoe's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?

    These articles are always pretty useless. Some local terms are mentioned, but they are often used incorrectly, and poorly defined. Sometimes old words used mostly by old people. Sometimes the author thinks a very localized term is in general use. And almost always, such drivel tries to mock the local pronunciation or spelling or vocabulary without any real understanding.

    For instance, subs are commonly referred to as subs in Boston, and nobody ever considers it in any way unusual. A frappe has the ice cream mixed in; I've never seen it floating on top. Calling the MBTA "The T" is not laziness, it's the brand as promoted by the company.

    The article is pretty much total carp; useless as a guide for locals or out-of-towners, and ridiculously inaccurate. There are distinctive local pronunciations and vocabulary, pretty much everywhere. Semi-literate interns shouldn't make such a big deal about it in their sophomoric articles.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Old Timer. Show Old Timer's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?

    I've lived in Boston all my life, and that's 80 years.  I've never heard Dot used for Dorchester; we just sort of slide all the syllables together.  I've never called anything "tonic" except quinine water, preferable Schweppes, in my gin & tonic.  And I never used the word "pop."  "Soda" was enough to identify it.  Milk Shakes do exist.  They are milk or cream beaten up with chocolate syrup.  If it has ice cream beaten in, it's a frappe.  Unless you live in Rhode Island, where they were (maybe still are) called "cabinets."

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from deadjoe. Show deadjoe's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?

    '' 'Ahm' for 'I'm' -- i.e, Emily Rooney ''

    Please, no. The bizarre way that pompous blowhard named "Awm Emily Rooney"  talks has nothing to do with Boston dialect or accent.

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Shovie. Show Shovie's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?

    In response to OneBostonian's comment:

    Where is the author from? Connecticut?  No Bostonian calls a sub a grinder.



    Agree, term Grinder is used  throughout the state of Mass, but not in Boston...

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from maroots. Show maroots's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?

    "Suppahs ready, go in the barthroom and wash your hands"

    My mother had my kids giggling with that one :-)

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Oldhaggis. Show Oldhaggis's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?


    cahd boawd cahden - -  instead of cardboard carton. 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Oldhaggis. Show Oldhaggis's posts

    Re: What other words or phrases define how Bostonians speak?

    In response to Old Timer's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I've lived in Boston all my life, and that's 80 years.  I've never heard Dot used for Dorchester; we just sort of slide all the syllables together.  I've never called anything "tonic" except quinine water, preferable Schweppes, in my gin & tonic.  And I never used the word "pop."  "Soda" was enough to identify it.  Milk Shakes do exist.  They are milk or cream beaten up with chocolate syrup.  If it has ice cream beaten in, it's a frappe.  Unless you live in Rhode Island, where they were (maybe still are) called "cabinets."

    [/QUOTE]

    I agree on the soda label for all carbonated bevies.  Also the difference between milkshakes and frappes.   The author of this article ain't paht a' Boston, no way.

     

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