Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Del1. Show Del1's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    I think there are two different arguments for adding bike lanes and reducing car travel lanes.  The first is that the benefits of encouraging bike traffic is increased individual and global health.  Secondly, East Arlingon needs a serious freshening and the added visual appeal of the project will undoubtedly improve the town's fortunes.

     
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  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Dehler. Show Dehler's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    Yes, of course, bike lanes and sidewalks should be considered.

    Time for cars to take a back seat to healthy, pollution-free alternatives. 

    Especially, in this environment.

    Americans are already overweight and lazy enough.

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from PC86. Show PC86's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    ABSOLUTELY NOT. Motorists pay for the use of the road through registration fees, inspection fees, excise tax, and fines for not following the rules of the road. Bicycles pay no fees, have no identification, and ride in a manner that would land a motorist in jail for driving to endanger. Yet we are going to spend nearly 7 million dollars accommodating and encouraging these cyclists to ride in the middle of a major state route. Especially when parallel to Mass Ave is one of the most reputable bike paths that our tax dollars are already going towards to maintain  including being plowed. Where does it end? Either come up with a system to register and identify cyclists over 18 and charge them a reasonable fee, or keep them off the roads we as motorists pay for. Narrowing the East end of Mass Ave slightly to add better crosswalks and sidewalks while maintaining the 4 travel lanes would be one thing, but to remove a westbound lane in favor of bicycle lanes is insanity. 

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from PC86. Show PC86's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to Dehler's comment:

    Yes, of course, bike lanes and sidewalks should be considered.

    Time for cars to take a back seat to healthy, pollution-free alternatives. 

    Especially, in this environment.

    Americans are already overweight and lazy enough.

     



    Time for cyclists to pay for the use of the roads we're supposed to be sharing. Enjoy your pollution free ride while paying to have it registered and issued an identifying plate or sticker. So when a cyclists comes to a red light, does the look twice and rolls right through it, they can be stopped by law enforcement and issued a fine. They may be pollution-free but they can no longer be operator and responsibility free. Roads cost money and have rules. Share the road, Share the Responsibility. 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from bostonbd. Show bostonbd's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to ddsuburbs' comment:

    The town currently envisions a $6.8 million project to reconfigure Massachusetts Avenue along a mile-long stretch in East Arlington. The busy thoroughfare now has two travel lanes for cars and trucks in each direction. Arlington officials have proposed reducing the number of vehicle lanes, mostly on the westbound side of the avenue, in order to install bicycle lanes on each side of the roadway. The project will also include sidewalk and pedestrian-crossing improvements. The East Arlington Concerned Citizens Committee collected more than 3,000 signatures to get a nonbinding question on the town election ballot April 6. The measure asks residents whether they think Massachusetts Avenue should have four lanes as it does now. 

     

    This question is worded irresponsibly, with an anti-project bias. The organization that collected these signatures is supported by money from the Big Oil and Big Auto industries, via the lobbyists that they pay. See this post regarding the ludicrous letter sent to the MassDOT from one such firm:

    http://ealscoalition.org/2013/02/22/climate-change-deniers-lobbied-to-kill-the-mass-ave-corridor-plan/

    Call the company that sent this letter - ask who funds them. Then ask 10 more questions.

     

    After years of getting this project through regulatory hurdles, and the vast majority of the money being offered as a one-time, now-or-never federal grant, a few paid "plants" who do not think of the greater good are attempting to sow fear and anger into people. These tactics are transparent, and the proponents unrepentant. I consider any online comments against this project to be bought and paid for by disgusting immoral men looking only to sow grief and fear in order to hoard the last of the resources, and therefore enormous profits, into the infinite and un-quenchable depths of personal greed. Or else they aren't interested in anything other than their own bellybutton. 

     

    This plan is an upgrade to the beat-up old street, and will make the well-used corridor safer for every single mode of transportation used thereon. A continuation of the bike lanes from Cambridge into Arlington makes perfect sense to allow easy access to Porter and Harvard Squares. The Minutman Bike Path is almost perpendicular to Mass Ave in terms of final destination. One doesn't take the Minuteman to get to Porter or Harvard from Arlington, because it goes to Alewife, where it then connects more easily to Belmont and Fresh Pond. The reality is that Mass Ave. in Arlington is used just like the tri-mode (walk, bike, car) alignment is used as built on Mass Ave. in Cambridge. Its just because there is an imaginary town line on the street that there's not a bike lane and better asphalt on there now. In other words, if this was thought of when Cambridge was adding bike lanes, and was considered part of a "Federal Highway Rt. 3" project, we'd already have an excellently functioning tri-mode design built in Arlington by now.

     

    I have just moved to Capitol Square in Arlington after living in W. Somverville and N. Cambridge for the past 15 years without a car, and biking everywhere with a helmet. I have personally noticed the ludicrous speed of traffic on and very poor quality of the Mass Ave. road surface in Arlington, and both will be solved with this plan. In fact, I think there's enough space to fit 2 bike lanes and 4 traffic lanes, but that will absolutely not make the area safer for people other than those encased in giant metal boxes. It is an absolute FACT, bourne of 4 in-person, on-location surveys of traffic, that there is not as much traffic heading out of Cambridge as there is heading in, even at pm rush hour. I can also say, from my own first-hand knowledge of every day of the week and at all times of day, that it is true. The new plan will make turning into side streets easier, and make crossing the street safer for walkers, by slowing traffic down. Alot of the complaints from drivers are baseless and selfish. Cars have the least right-of-way BY LAW, and must yield to bikes and Pedestrians BY LAW. Drivers need to SLOW DOWN in densely populated areas for everyone's safety, including their own. Bikes are everywhere, and IT IS UP TO EACH AND EVERY INDIVIDUAL DRIVER to watch out and act safe when near a bike. DRIVERS HAVE THE MOST OPPORTUNITY TO CAUSE INJURY AND DEATH TO A WALKER OR BIKER. Vice-versa? that's a big "no-contest".

    So anyone who is against this progress toward the future, who is against this improvement in the quality of life of everyone who passes through the area and who lives in the area, who is against the acceptance of something they can't control, and anyone who is against it because you just instinctually want to hate.....  well, you are not a valid member of a productive dialog and positive societal outlook.

    It is you, who should come to the area to see how great it is, and how much greater it can be, with these wonderful improvements. See a brand new movie in 3D with real butter on your popcorn and a glass of beer or wine with no lines and short money at the Capitol Theater & Ice Cream Parlour! Have an elegant dinner at Flora or Olivio before your movie, or for a celebration. Grab incredible pastries, breads, and frosted items at Quebrada Bakery. The best coffee in Boston is at Barismo. Choose from 4 completely different types of asian cooking, including Hot Pot! Bring your kids to one of the 3 totally different arts & crafts studios. Or the kids-related Fox public library branch. Have 3 totally different kinds of Pizza! Get your hair cut or nails done at 6 different places. Do more stuff I don't even know about.

    This place is a great place to live, and will ony get better with this project. Then it will be even better when you come visit!

     

    Here are some photo-realistic views that simulate the new alignment:

    http://ealscoalition.org/mass-ave/

     

    Its perfect, its better, and its the future.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from megmuck. Show megmuck's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to Crudmudgeon's comment:

    "No roads really are not.  It is derelict of our political leaders to make the claim.  You have 3 ton vehicles and even bigger trucks moving at 30-50 miles per hour on the same road as 200# bikes moving 5-20 mph."

    The speed limit in East Arlington on Mass Ave is 25 MPH. Any truck driving 50 MPH there is endangering the public. Any driver going 40 MPH has a 95% chance of killing any pedestrian they hit--and there are plenty of pedestrians in East Arlington.

    We need accept that people just need to slow down on some roads. 

     

     



     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from markk02474. Show markk02474's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    No. Mass Ave is US highway 3 and 3A, part of the National Highway System, and Mass State Highway, Route 2A. About half the funding comes from the CMAQ federal program designed to improve air quality by reducing traffic congestion and vehicles stuck idling in traffic. The proposed removal of a travel lane and resulting increase in congestion clearly illustrates how bad government wastes tax dollars.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from markk02474. Show markk02474's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to bostonbd's comment:

    This question is worded irresponsibly, with an anti-project bias. The organization that collected these signatures is supported by money from the Big Oil and Big Auto industries, via the lobbyists that they pay.

    This is a laughable claim. How could it be that Big Oil and Big Auto can't afford to cover one town in lawn signs to the extent Liz Warren did across the town and state, Obama did across the town and state, and the pro-tax increase Yes 4 Arlington campaign did?  Besides being extremely unlikely, the claim is false that transportation preservationists got any outside money.

    [QUOTE]

    Here are some photo-realistic views that simulate the new alignment: http://ealscoalition.org/mass-ave/

    [/QUOTE]

    This is yet another falsehood. The second set of images reflects the 2011 date of its creation, not any recent plans put forth by the Town with that crosswalk moved. The town wants far more sidewalk widening for shrub planters than raised medians for pedestrian safety. Just 100 feet of raised median in 5,200 feet of project, and NO pedestrian crossing signals like those now on Mill Street.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from lucys6. Show lucys6's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    Arlington is being held back by a group of (strangely) well-funded cranks who also think self-serve gas is the work of Satan - I'm not kidding, check the town email forum. Come to think of it, they think bicycles are the work of Satan, too.

    The rest of us are too busy to post in every forum and attend every town meeting, but we expect that ugly, dangerous stretches of road should not be tolerated in our town. Don't review this forum thinking it will give you a read on town sentiment. It's the same old cranks who appear to have a lot of time on their hands. 

    Now I have to get to work. Sometimes I drive, sometimes I take the bus - either way, I welcome a major renovation to Mass Ave.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from YoEddy. Show YoEddy's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to PC86's comment:
    So if you ride a bike should you get a tax break on less wear and tear on the road than a car?

    In response to Dehler's comment:

     

    Yes, of course, bike lanes and sidewalks should be considered.

    Time for cars to take a back seat to healthy, pollution-free alternatives. 

    Especially, in this environment.

    Americans are already overweight and lazy enough.

     

     



    Time for cyclists to pay for the use of the roads we're supposed to be sharing. Enjoy your pollution free ride while paying to have it registered and issued an identifying plate or sticker. So when a cyclists comes to a red light, does the look twice and rolls right through it, they can be stopped by law enforcement and issued a fine. They may be pollution-free but they can no longer be operator and responsibility free. Roads cost money and have rules. Share the road, Share the Responsibility. 

     

    [/QUOTE]


     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from YoEddy. Show YoEddy's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to That_Guy_32's comment:
    [Having bike take only the minuteman is the same as asking cars to just take rt2.  Its stupid to ask people to think that a single bike path can handle all the bike traffic.]

    >>> Why don't the cars instead of Mass Ave take Rt2?

    During the times that Mass Ave backs up, Route 2 is likely worse.

    >>> Or why don't those people driving on Mass Ave just take a bus?

    Many of us do.  And I'd rather that bus not need 20+ minutes to get from Lake Street to the intersection with Route 16.

    As was said before, the Minuteman Path is within a few hundred feet of Mass Ave at Pond Lane, and it's 4 - 5 blocks away at most anywhere south of that.  I use it all the time, and it's one of the main reasons I moved to Arlington.  But so is MBTA access, and I believe that the additional congestion this project would cause on Mass Ave, and by extension the impact on public transportation, far outweigh the benefits.

    Edit -- Saw that the design has been updated to keep two eastbound car lanes on Mass Ave.  While not addressing all of my concerns, it is an improvement over the 1 & 1 plan.

    [/QUOTE]


     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from bigverb. Show bigverb's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    I don't see why a bike lane is needed, but the sidewalks around the Lake Street and Mass Ave inetrsection need to be much, much wider.  Also pedestrain crossing should be raised and better marked. Too many out-of-state indiots (NH) don't know what a pedestrain crossing is. 

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Crudmudgeon. Show Crudmudgeon's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to megmuck's comment:

     

    The speed limit in East Arlington on Mass Ave is 25 MPH. 

     

     

     


    Lady, you are wrong, probably comes from living in Lexington.  Take a look at this google streetview image of the speed limit sign on Mass Ave in East Arlington just as you enter from Cambridge (near the old Hollywoord video).  The sign is clearly marked, 30MPH

     

    https://maps.google.com/maps?q=mass+ave+arlington+ma&hl=en&ll=42.401467,-71.136925&spn=0.00572,0.02223&sll=42.036922,-71.683501&sspn=3.373827,5.690918&t=h&hnear=Massachusetts+Ave,+Arlington,+Massachusetts&z=16&layer=c&cbll=42.401387,-71.136821&panoid=82WahAhUzPgm5UOxAEvThw&cbp=12,345.13,,0,7.93 

    The same is true all along Mass Ave, the speed limit is 30MPH, not 25MPH as you spewed.  Now that you are completely WRONG please don't try to say write anything else about Arlington, your credibility is all shot.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from jtreilly2. Show jtreilly2's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    I think it should be reduced to one lane each way and have a lane for bikes. Don't forget to stop by the new Menotomy Grille openning this spring !!!! It will be in the old Hollywood Video location, so take your frustrations with traffic and this bar/restaurant ? ?

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from That_Guy_32. Show That_Guy_32's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to YoEddy's comment:

    In response to That_Guy_32's comment:
    [Having bike take only the minuteman is the same as asking cars to just take rt2.  Its stupid to ask people to think that a single bike path can handle all the bike traffic.]



    I didn't suggest what you're describing.  That would assume bikes can't travel on Mass Ave in its current state, which is not the case.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from YoEddy. Show YoEddy's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    http://www.boston.com/yourtown/wellesley/2013/03/16/wellesley-considers-creating-bike-lanes-after-death-cyclist/QI39xdIsaqAvNwJX87k6DK/story.html

     

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from baggelio. Show baggelio's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    Arlington used to be a nice town to live in, the streets were cleaned, the schools were great, until now.  Arlington is becoming expensive to live in because every Tom, Dick and Harry that has a pet project or peeve and get's it passed.  Why is Arlington spending my money on a problem that is not there?  That money could be used, oh I don't know but just saying, it could be used to clean the streets, spend it on our children's education, etc. But instead we have these enviromentalists that tell me to ride a bike to work, or take the T because it's healthier.   You ride your bike! You are probably the same people that voted against the leaf blower because as our rep in Arlington Town Hall stated "it's healthier to go out and rake instead of using a leaf blower"  Not everyone can ride a bike because of many issues, mine would be age I'm tired of people in the Town Hall  making wrong decisions and spending my money!  There was never a problem with people riding bikes, there was never a problem with buses, where did you people come from and can you please go back there!  Don't spend my money on problems that are not there! spend it on our kids education because God knows we need a better generation in politics than we have now. 

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from elpaulito. Show elpaulito's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    Wondering what is wrong with the bike path that runs parallel to Mass Ave. 

    Considering it can take 20 minutes (2+ miles) during the weekday commute to get from the center to Rte 16 and vice versa, I am shocked that anyone would think cutting down the lanes is going to help congestion. Or is the "Little Lance" crowd that wants to ride on the street rather than the boke path we have already bought and paid for? 

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from ob89. Show ob89's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to ArlRes' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Yes.

    I live within a quarter of a block of Mass Ave on the Cambridge end of the proposed roadway improvement project and see first hand, on a daily basis, the traffic and issues along the corridor.  The only traffic that may exist along this road, in either direction, is traffic that backs up from the Alewife Brook Parkway stoplight because that intersection is undersized and is not in Arlington.  In addition, there is no proposed removal of vehicular travel lanes in that direction.  In reality, the roadway is only striped for one lane in each direction currently, however, I do understand that it's frequently used as a four-lane roadway.  There is never, ever, traffic going in the direction toward Arlington Center, even at peak afternoon travel times.  This is the direction that will be one wide vehicular travel lane. 

    The other improvements that will help move traffic along are the MBTA bus stops actually being long enough to fit a bus, of which they are not currently, therefore they should be out of traffic.  There will be a bike lane an additional width in the outbound lane for a delivery vehicle to move out of the way of the travel lane.  Biles will now have their designated lane and will not impede traffic in a vehicular lane, as they currently do.

    Please also remember that the main goal of this project was NOT to add bike lanes, but to improve safety along the Mass Ave Corridor.  Maintaining the status quo does not do this.  The less distance a pedestrian needs to cross in any stretch improves their safety.  Crossing four lanes as a pedestrian, a bike, or a car is significantly less safe than crossing three.  Two would have been our best case scenario, but there was compromise with the opposition wanting four lanes. 

    Also, to add, all of the traffic studies and analysis determined that one lane in each direction for most of the corridor would have been sufficient for traffic flow. 

    [/QUOTE

    going from 4 to 3 is going to increase traffic. It's just common sense. The traffic does in fact back up into Cambridge as it currently is arranged. And cutting down from two lanes to one right at the route 16 intersection is going back traffic up even worse every night. 

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from ob89. Show ob89's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to ab5000's comment:

    I don't live in Arlington anymore (I did for several years and I live in Medford now) - but can I ask a serious question?  Who are these politicians representing - who is demanding these changes?  What percentage of Arlington taxpayers and residents ride a bike on a consistent basis - 5%, 10%, 20% max?  Why is so much money and time being spent on such a small group?  Did anyone see the storm a few weeks ago - is the is city planning on banning bicycles during the winter?  This is not Europe and we have a very different climate.  

    Why not a bill on bicycles riders responsibilities and not just "rights" - the problem is people what to be "special" and don't want to deal with responsibilities.

    All bikes should be registered and have a license tag

    All riders need a license to operate and should take a test

    Moving violations need to be enforced and fined at the same rate as cars - so no going wrong way down a street because it's conventient etc.

    All riders need a helmet and will be fined $50 for first violation, $100 for second, $250 for third and then revocation of biking license.

    All bicycles should have appropriate lights and reflectors

    Bicyclists cannot ride side by side in the bicycle lane, and so on.

     



    Here here.

     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from ob89. Show ob89's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to bostonbd's comment:

    In response to ddsuburbs' comment:

    The town currently envisions a $6.8 million project to reconfigure Massachusetts Avenue along a mile-long stretch in East Arlington. The busy thoroughfare now has two travel lanes for cars and trucks in each direction. Arlington officials have proposed reducing the number of vehicle lanes, mostly on the westbound side of the avenue, in order to install bicycle lanes on each side of the roadway. The project will also include sidewalk and pedestrian-crossing improvements. The East Arlington Concerned Citizens Committee collected more than 3,000 signatures to get a nonbinding question on the town election ballot April 6. The measure asks residents whether they think Massachusetts Avenue should have four lanes as it does now. 

     

    This question is worded irresponsibly, with an anti-project bias. The organization that collected these signatures is supported by money from the Big Oil and Big Auto industries, via the lobbyists that they pay. See this post regarding the ludicrous letter sent to the MassDOT from one such firm:

    http://ealscoalition.org/2013/02/22/climate-change-deniers-lobbied-to-kill-the-mass-ave-corridor-plan/

    Call the company that sent this letter - ask who funds them. Then ask 10 more questions.

     

    After years of getting this project through regulatory hurdles, and the vast majority of the money being offered as a one-time, now-or-never federal grant, a few paid "plants" who do not think of the greater good are attempting to sow fear and anger into people. These tactics are transparent, and the proponents unrepentant. I consider any online comments against this project to be bought and paid for by disgusting immoral men looking only to sow grief and fear in order to hoard the last of the resources, and therefore enormous profits, into the infinite and un-quenchable depths of personal greed. Or else they aren't interested in anything other than their own bellybutton. 

     

    This plan is an upgrade to the beat-up old street, and will make the well-used corridor safer for every single mode of transportation used thereon. A continuation of the bike lanes from Cambridge into Arlington makes perfect sense to allow easy access to Porter and Harvard Squares. The Minutman Bike Path is almost perpendicular to Mass Ave in terms of final destination. One doesn't take the Minuteman to get to Porter or Harvard from Arlington, because it goes to Alewife, where it then connects more easily to Belmont and Fresh Pond. The reality is that Mass Ave. in Arlington is used just like the tri-mode (walk, bike, car) alignment is used as built on Mass Ave. in Cambridge. Its just because there is an imaginary town line on the street that there's not a bike lane and better asphalt on there now. In other words, if this was thought of when Cambridge was adding bike lanes, and was considered part of a "Federal Highway Rt. 3" project, we'd already have an excellently functioning tri-mode design built in Arlington by now.

     

    I have just moved to Capitol Square in Arlington after living in W. Somverville and N. Cambridge for the past 15 years without a car, and biking everywhere with a helmet. I have personally noticed the ludicrous speed of traffic on and very poor quality of the Mass Ave. road surface in Arlington, and both will be solved with this plan. In fact, I think there's enough space to fit 2 bike lanes and 4 traffic lanes, but that will absolutely not make the area safer for people other than those encased in giant metal boxes. It is an absolute FACT, bourne of 4 in-person, on-location surveys of traffic, that there is not as much traffic heading out of Cambridge as there is heading in, even at pm rush hour. I can also say, from my own first-hand knowledge of every day of the week and at all times of day, that it is true. The new plan will make turning into side streets easier, and make crossing the street safer for walkers, by slowing traffic down. Alot of the complaints from drivers are baseless and selfish. Cars have the least right-of-way BY LAW, and must yield to bikes and Pedestrians BY LAW. Drivers need to SLOW DOWN in densely populated areas for everyone's safety, including their own. Bikes are everywhere, and IT IS UP TO EACH AND EVERY INDIVIDUAL DRIVER to watch out and act safe when near a bike. DRIVERS HAVE THE MOST OPPORTUNITY TO CAUSE INJURY AND DEATH TO A WALKER OR BIKER. Vice-versa? that's a big "no-contest".

    So anyone who is against this progress toward the future, who is against this improvement in the quality of life of everyone who passes through the area and who lives in the area, who is against the acceptance of something they can't control, and anyone who is against it because you just instinctually want to hate.....  well, you are not a valid member of a productive dialog and positive societal outlook.

    It is you, who should come to the area to see how great it is, and how much greater it can be, with these wonderful improvements. See a brand new movie in 3D with real butter on your popcorn and a glass of beer or wine with no lines and short money at the Capitol Theater & Ice Cream Parlour! Have an elegant dinner at Flora or Olivio before your movie, or for a celebration. Grab incredible pastries, breads, and frosted items at Quebrada Bakery. The best coffee in Boston is at Barismo. Choose from 4 completely different types of asian cooking, including Hot Pot! Bring your kids to one of the 3 totally different arts & crafts studios. Or the kids-related Fox public library branch. Have 3 totally different kinds of Pizza! Get your hair cut or nails done at 6 different places. Do more stuff I don't even know about.

    This place is a great place to live, and will ony get better with this project. Then it will be even better when you come visit!

     

    Here are some photo-realistic views that simulate the new alignment:

    http://ealscoalition.org/mass-ave/

     

    Its perfect, its better, and its the future.



    No we're not against progress, we just disagree with the plan that this will work. Many of us would love a plan that seems like it makes sense. I drive from East Arlington to Harvard Square everyday and know that, despite what a study might say, there is more traffic coming into arlington than going out at 5 PM. By having 2 lanes turning into 1 right at the arlington/Cambridge line we're going to have problems. I've lived here for over 30 years, I know what I'm talking about. This feels like a prime example of politicians grabbing money because its there and the rads will be repaired on the Feds dime. So try not to be so judgemental with those of us that just disagree with you. 

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from baggelio. Show baggelio's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    Here's a thought, I pay excise taxes in Arlington for my car, time for bike riders to do the same.  Register your bike, pay for plates, pay for an inspection sticker every year, pay for insurance, pay for escise tax, pay for registration every year, pay for a license every 10 years, etc.  If you really want this, then pay for it, I'm tired of paying for projects that do not make sense, tired of paying for bike lanes that are supposed to make others safe but in the end only cause havic.  You have the bike lane behind the capital, oh which by the way does have a STOP sign on Lake street that some people seem to think it doesn't apply to them, walkers included!  Traffic if bad everywhere, this is not a good idea, it would back up everywhere, all the way to Cambridge, oh but the bikers, well they don't have to obey the traffic signals and can weave in and out of traffic.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from PC86. Show PC86's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    In response to YoEddy's comment:

    In response to PC86's comment:
    So if you ride a bike should you get a tax break on less wear and tear on the road than a car?

    In response to Dehler's comment:

     

    Yes, of course, bike lanes and sidewalks should be considered.

    Time for cars to take a back seat to healthy, pollution-free alternatives. 

    Especially, in this environment.

    Americans are already overweight and lazy enough.

     

     



    Time for cyclists to pay for the use of the roads we're supposed to be sharing. Enjoy your pollution free ride while paying to have it registered and issued an identifying plate or sticker. So when a cyclists comes to a red light, does the look twice and rolls right through it, they can be stopped by law enforcement and issued a fine. They may be pollution-free but they can no longer be operator and responsibility free. Roads cost money and have rules. Share the road, Share the Responsibility. 

     




    [/QUOTE]

    Why should cyclists get a tax break when they contribute nothing to begin with? Pay for a registration, and a license to use the road at all. Or give motorists the tax break for paying for your Bike Paths.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from itsjibba. Show itsjibba's posts

    Re: Should Mass. Avenue in Arlington be reduced to make way for sidewalks, bike lanes and pedestrian crossings?

    It's absolutely not true that motorists pay for the roads through fees.  In Massachusetts, fees only pay for 41.5% of road costs.  

    http://taxfoundation.org/article/gasoline-taxes-and-tolls-pay-only-third-state-local-road-spending

    That leaves 58.5% of the cost subsidized by property and sales tax payers, many of whom don't use cars.  Cars put much more wear and tear on the roads, so they should pay more per mile than cyclists.

    In any case, like most cyclists in Arlington, I own a car too.  When I choose to ride my bike instead of driving, I contribute LESS to road congestion than if I drive.  Between my registration fees, inspection fees, excise tax, fines, property taxes, and sales tax, I more than pay for my use of the road as a cyclists.    

     

    In response to PC86's comment:

    ABSOLUTELY NOT. Motorists pay for the use of the road through registration fees, inspection fees, excise tax, and fines for not following the rules of the road. Bicycles pay no fees, have no identification, and ride in a manner that would land a motorist in jail for driving to endanger. Yet we are going to spend nearly 7 million dollars accommodating and encouraging these cyclists to ride in the middle of a major state route. Especially when parallel to Mass Ave is one of the most reputable bike paths that our tax dollars are already going towards to maintain  including being plowed. Where does it end? Either come up with a system to register and identify cyclists over 18 and charge them a reasonable fee, or keep them off the roads we as motorists pay for. Narrowing the East end of Mass Ave slightly to add better crosswalks and sidewalks while maintaining the 4 travel lanes would be one thing, but to remove a westbound lane in favor of bicycle lanes is insanity. 




     
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