Monitoring your child's music choices

Posted by Lylah M. Alphonse  April 29, 2009 08:20 AM

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My mother spent her formative years in a convent boarding school in India where, when it came to popular music, anything other than Pat Boone was off limits. When I was a tween, my mom allowed me to buy Madonna's first album, but "Like a Virgin" was not allowed in our house -- not appropriate for a young girl, my mom decided -- and Heavy Metal was deemed "too disruptive." (The Grateful Dead was OK, because it was mellow; I don't think she was aware of exactly how mellow, but my brothers, who were major fans, certainly weren't going to point that out.)

Now that I'm the parent, I find myself wishing that the line between "acceptable" and "not-acceptable" music was as easy to find. Lyrics and album covers are one thing, but what stars do in their personal lives is part of the daily news cycle now -- by allowing your child to listen to their music, are you condoning the artists' behavior? With iPods to fill and song samples available for free online and even on your phone, it's much more difficult to monitor what your kids are listening to these days -- how do you help them decide what to buy when it's so easy to leave the parents out of the decision making process?

At U.S. News, Mary Kate Cary solves the problem at her house with a "do not buy" list. "I can't stop them from listening to all rap music, or all hip-hop, or even all pop music. Much of it is fine. Plus, offensive music is everywhere -- friends' houses, on the radio in the carpool, even at the ice-skating rink," she points out. "But I can say we're not going to support certain artists financially, even if it's only 99 cents at a time, by purchasing ring-tones and iTunes of their songs. They don't have to ask permission before every song, but my husband and I reserve the right to audit their iTunes list at any time."

Our 15-year-old and 13-year-old daughters' iPods are filled with bubblegum pop like The Jonas Brothers, Country/Western faves from their Mom's collection, and some eclectic selections from their Dad, who used to be a music critic. Our 4- and 2-year-olds are easy -- they listen to what we give them (I have a running list of kids' music that won't make my ears bleed). Our 10-year-old is the one who really needs monitoring; he loves to listen to music clips online, where it's far too easy to segue from standing under Rihanna's "Umbrella" to rolling with Li'l Wayne.

How do you keep an eye -- or, rather, an ear -- on what your kids are hearing? Do they have to run their song choices by you first? Do you have veto power over what they download from iTunes? What's on your own "Do Not Buy" list?

Lylah M. Alphonse is a Globe staff member and mom and stepmom to five kids. She writes about juggling career and parenthood at The 36-Hour Day and blogs at Write. Edit. Repeat. E-mail her at lalphonse@globe.com.

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This blog is not written or edited by Boston.com or the Boston Globe.
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21 comments so far...
  1. The only thing I wouldn't want my daughter listening to is the insipid poorly done music marketed towards kids like Kidz Bop.

    She can listen to anything she wants.

    Posted by c April 29, 09 04:38 PM
  1. The first CD my mom ever bought for me was Green Day's "Dookie"
    The first CD she bought for my brother was Bob Marley 7 The Wailers' "Legend"
    We now both have excellent taste in music. We prefer artists that write their own songs and play their own instruments over all the pop trash that emphasizes looks over actual talent and ability.
    The only censorship my mom enforced was that the music had to be quality, not bubblegum filler. We'd have meaningful conversations with her about what we thought the songs meant, and how they made us feel.

    Posted by Noel April 29, 09 04:54 PM
  1. The issue, though, is that some of the music out there -- not a lot, but some -- is actually pretty violent or crudely and overtly sexual. Some is really graphic. I do not let my 8 year old watch Rated R movies. No "No Country for Old Men," no "Clockwork Orange," no "Seven," etc. No "The Accused." So likewise, I do not let him listen to songs that are overtly violent or sexual. It's not about the quality of the music -- they can like what they want (if it is annoying bubblegum, he just can't listen to it in the living room) -- but about what is appropriate for the age they are. And like an adult move or adult TV show, some music is for adults, not kids, because of its graphic content.

    Posted by j-len April 29, 09 05:24 PM
  1. What will happen if your child listens to music not on the approved list? Next will you monitor the stories they read on line or in the newspaper? Do you monitor what your partner listens to? Try a positive approach...let your child take lessons on an instrument, join the school band or orchestra and take them to hear live concerts.

    Posted by Sarah April 29, 09 05:41 PM
  1. Sarah, we're talking about little kids. Do you not monitor your children's activities or is it "anything goes"? Of course not. You parent your children. You set boundaries. You model good behavior.
    I think that parenting extends to music -- for little ones, and that's what I am clearly talking about, as I mentioned my 8 year old. As for the internt: at 8 he isn't going online except to do research for school -- and with all that is out there online, it would be *insanely* bad parenting to let an elementary school kid go online without monitoring. That can't be what you are suggesting. So he is enrolled in activities and clubs. He plays guitar. But he also does not get free-reign to watch whatver he wants or listen to music that promote violence. To call that bad parenting is odd.

    Posted by j-len April 29, 09 06:01 PM
  1. The point I was trying to make is that if you understand the music yourself, as a parent, or a movie or tv show, as a parent, then it's easy to tell what your kids will be able to handle. You can talk about it with them, you can give them some perspective. Nothing is good or bad, but thinking makes it so. Kids need to know it's one thing to talk the talk, it's another to walk the walk. This helps them be able to make responsible decisions about what they listen to for themselves.

    Posted by Noel April 29, 09 08:54 PM
  1. I don't want kids to listen to this crap like Lil Wayne and Yin Yang Twins, etc.... not because of its obscene sexual content and violence, or its overt references to using drugs and brand name quoting alcohol, or references to useless expensive material luxury items.

    It's more because the songs are just crap, yet they are all over BILLBOARD #1.... Ive heard 8 year olds sing this stuff!! I would hate to be a parent in this day and age! MTV and BET market this junk to kids with videos that bleep the offensive lyrical content yet leave the intent of the language quite visually obvious.

    Some musicians and their promoters/distributors have no social conscience.

    But, censorship and repressing this stuff from kids is not the answer!

    Vote with your dollar. Don't support them by buying the music, even if your kids beg. If the kids want the music... they will have to spend their hard earned first job money on it. Cancel cable, if you really care.

    Posted by John April 29, 09 09:18 PM
  1. As a parent of 14 and 10 year old daughters I say you must absolutely talk with your kids about why a specific song is something that shouldn't be supported by listening or buying. My neighbors daughter (8) came over the other day and was singing "You spin me right round baby when you go down, when u go down!" Granted she didn't know this song was a reference to strippers on a pole and oral sex, but what parent wouldn't change the station when this song is played. Listening to Britney brag about how "All the boys and all the girls want to IF (F) You (U) Seek (CK) Amy (ME) is not something my kids will ever be accused of.

    Tom

    Posted by Tom April 30, 09 12:32 AM
  1. Yeah, like Flo Rida on American Idol a couple weeks ago. Think any of the young fans understand what the words to Right Round were?

    I let my kids listen to anything, but I tell them things with inappropriate language (swear words, etc) should not be played for their friends. I don't want other parents getting upset that little Susie heard F*CK in a song that Janie played on her iPod.

    My kids hear enough bad language in their house from their Mom and Dad. :)


    Now TV is a different story. Many Disney shows blocked on our TV (Zack and Cody, Hannah Montana, etc). Can't stand that insipid crap and how they portray (smart a**) kids and (dumb) parents.

    Posted by Mike April 30, 09 08:23 AM
  1. We hardly ever listen to regular radio, and we don't own a TV, so we don't have a huge problem with policing our kids music just yet (they are 8 and 7). I try to expose them to a variety - my collection includes everything from jazz to classical to folk to alternative to acapella to world music. Although I have tried to teach them to head bang to Bohemian Rhapsody, given a choice, they like to listen to Phantom of the Opera, alternating with the Cars soundtrack.

    I do save the Nine Inch Nails and Korn for when they are at school though...

    Posted by BMS April 30, 09 08:44 AM
  1. Our 11 year olds have MP3 players but they don't have their own download accounts. If they want to download music (usually via a gift card) they have to use my account and I veto anything inappropriate. Before they got into digital music, I would buy CDs from Wal-Mart (where I'm happy that they censor!) of artists who they would like but who I also like and know - Green Day, Audioslave, U2 etc. When they want to download music that I don't know, which is usually only themes from sports video games or wrestling, I take a listen first before loading it up for them.

    That said, I am a child of the late 80s so my tween/early teen years were spent listening to the likes of GNR, Bon Jovi, Poison, Metallica and other hard rock/hair bands and I'm no worse for the wear! Back then we wouldn't let play the offensive lyrics in earshot of our parents, but we were at an age where if they had banned certain bands it would have made the music more appealing. I think that once kids get to an age where they can earn their own money to buy music and can be on a computer relatively unsupervised (I'm thinking 13, 14+) then there's not much you can do but hope that your prior influence sinks in. But before that, I get veto power. Finally, one of the coolest things my mom did was chaperone my friends and me to concerts in grades 7-9 when we were too young to go alone. We all had to buy our own tickets and share the cost of hers but she was willing to drive and sit there through the show, no matter how awful the band.

    Posted by Jen April 30, 09 08:54 AM
  1. We're definitely not at the point where this is an issue with our daughter yet, but it's something I've thought about. I remember huge battles with my mother over music - not because of foul language or sexual reference but because of the overall message of undermining authority and loads of foul language. By the time I was 10, all I wanted was a mohawk and Cockney Rejects album (I'd discovered a college radio station that played mostly '77 punk).

    And now, she and I laugh about how tame the music and its message is compared to the overglorified sex and drugs overtones of today's pop.

    For now, our daughter is being raised on a diet of classical, swing and punk. I guess that's a bridge we'll have to cross when we come to it.

    Posted by phe April 30, 09 10:18 AM
  1. Er...I should use the "preview" section more often. My post should have said, "not because of violent language or sexual reference.."

    Posted by phe April 30, 09 11:08 AM
  1. "Now TV is a different story. Many Disney shows blocked on our TV (Zack and Cody, Hannah Montana, etc). Can't stand that insipid crap and how they portray (smart a**) kids and (dumb) parents."

    I totally agree! However, most people think these shows are completely harmless and all in fun. It is SO not the example I want my kids to follow. They know all their friends watch them, but they are not allowed.

    Posted by mom2boys April 30, 09 12:07 PM
  1. My son is only 2 and loves good classical music and Jazz so I am ok for now . However when I was student teaching 6th grade a lot of the girls especially were listening to Eminem. This really really bugged me because I felt he was misogynistic and I had a no Eminem policy for myself. Instead of simply telling them I thought he hated women and why I didn't listen to him we turned it into a journal writing lesson. These kids who normally wrote 3-5 lines in their journal stayed in from lunch to finish 5-6 pages of why they like him. Their points were amazing , valid and honestly opened my eyes. These were kids who could relate to his messages, and his past. I was coming from a very different viewpoint and was blind to the good things he did provide these very disenfranchised kids. They didn't get a say in much, had a hard time expressing feelings but could through listening to him. It was an amazing dialogue that I hope now that I am a parent I can remember . I won't ban any music but I will ask my child to defend their choices, and make sure they are aware of what the artist is doing, and what the lyrics mean.

    Posted by Allie April 30, 09 12:24 PM
  1. My son discovered Top 40 this year when he entered junior high. I'm probably more lax about it than a lot of parents but we do discuss lyrics and their appropriateness. We also discuss what constitutes a "good" pop song and what is drivel. Out of principal I'll switch the station when certain songs come on even though the kids have heard them before - right now it's Britney's If you seek Amy and Asher Roth's I Love College. Radio is easy to control. Pretty soon my son will have an Itunes account which I will monitor. Eventually the censorship will go away but not at age 12. I'm hoping he'll go less mainstream but meanwhile I've become far more appreciative of pop music - the kind of stuff I would have dismissed with a toss of my spiked hair during my high school days.

    Posted by Cordelia April 30, 09 12:34 PM
  1. I would encourage listening "with" your child to anything he or she enjoys. I don't approve of some of the content of The Simpson's TV show for a 7 year-old (like my daughter), but when we watch together, we have the opportunity to talk with her about what's appropriate and not. Some of the content, though, is over her head, and so we don't even "go there." When she does listen to Pink in the car, and the lyrics contain the A-word, she closes her ears and goes "yayayayayaya" over the bad lyric. Other cuts, she just skips. I'm proud of her choice. She likes the music; I like that she is developing her own taste in music and she choreographs dances to it. There's a lot of positive. The lyrics are not sufficient reason to take away from the value of the rest of it.

    That's my 2 cents.

    Posted by Dr. Eric April 30, 09 06:39 PM
  1. My mother did not censure ANYTHING I listened to, read, or watched on tv. I had all kinds of music, from Bon Jovi to Nine Inch Nails. I watched R rated movies, and if I had nightmares, that was my fault--I learned not to watch them on my own. And I could read any book I wanted because I had my own library card. I still listen to all kinds of music, read all kinds of books, and watch whatever I want, and I allow the children in my life the same luxury.

    Posted by annie May 1, 09 02:45 PM
  1. Start them early with The Beatles and let them go with they want. It's music.....enjoy it. Laughing at kid who got Green Day's Dookie for his first album, that was their first "sell out"effort.

    Posted by libertine May 2, 09 11:40 AM
  1. Libertine- I didn't say anything about Green Day's "Dookie"'s quality, or importance. It just happened to be my first CD and it also contained a lot of material some people might find inappropriate for a child, so it was worth pointing out.
    I didn't realize that the 1st CD you own has to be the best CD ever made. Get over yourself!
    What was your 1st CD?

    Posted by Noel May 5, 09 01:46 PM
  1. My mother never really censored anything with me. I grew up around the rock music she listened to (The Eagles, Kiss, AC/DC were my mom's favorites) Those are some of my favorite bands now, with the addition of Rush as my favorite band.I do not like most of music that is put out today, and no offense to anyone who does, but how, did we go from epic songs like "Hotel California" to crap like "My lip gloss is poppin'" or whatever that song is called? (and don't even get me started on this Hanna Montana crap...) If i ever have kids, I would let them make their own decisions on what they want to listen to, but I'll try to expose them to good rock music ASAP.

    Posted by Jade August 24, 09 09:50 PM
 
21 comments so far...
  1. The only thing I wouldn't want my daughter listening to is the insipid poorly done music marketed towards kids like Kidz Bop.

    She can listen to anything she wants.

    Posted by c April 29, 09 04:38 PM
  1. The first CD my mom ever bought for me was Green Day's "Dookie"
    The first CD she bought for my brother was Bob Marley 7 The Wailers' "Legend"
    We now both have excellent taste in music. We prefer artists that write their own songs and play their own instruments over all the pop trash that emphasizes looks over actual talent and ability.
    The only censorship my mom enforced was that the music had to be quality, not bubblegum filler. We'd have meaningful conversations with her about what we thought the songs meant, and how they made us feel.

    Posted by Noel April 29, 09 04:54 PM
  1. The issue, though, is that some of the music out there -- not a lot, but some -- is actually pretty violent or crudely and overtly sexual. Some is really graphic. I do not let my 8 year old watch Rated R movies. No "No Country for Old Men," no "Clockwork Orange," no "Seven," etc. No "The Accused." So likewise, I do not let him listen to songs that are overtly violent or sexual. It's not about the quality of the music -- they can like what they want (if it is annoying bubblegum, he just can't listen to it in the living room) -- but about what is appropriate for the age they are. And like an adult move or adult TV show, some music is for adults, not kids, because of its graphic content.

    Posted by j-len April 29, 09 05:24 PM
  1. What will happen if your child listens to music not on the approved list? Next will you monitor the stories they read on line or in the newspaper? Do you monitor what your partner listens to? Try a positive approach...let your child take lessons on an instrument, join the school band or orchestra and take them to hear live concerts.

    Posted by Sarah April 29, 09 05:41 PM
  1. Sarah, we're talking about little kids. Do you not monitor your children's activities or is it "anything goes"? Of course not. You parent your children. You set boundaries. You model good behavior.
    I think that parenting extends to music -- for little ones, and that's what I am clearly talking about, as I mentioned my 8 year old. As for the internt: at 8 he isn't going online except to do research for school -- and with all that is out there online, it would be *insanely* bad parenting to let an elementary school kid go online without monitoring. That can't be what you are suggesting. So he is enrolled in activities and clubs. He plays guitar. But he also does not get free-reign to watch whatver he wants or listen to music that promote violence. To call that bad parenting is odd.

    Posted by j-len April 29, 09 06:01 PM
  1. The point I was trying to make is that if you understand the music yourself, as a parent, or a movie or tv show, as a parent, then it's easy to tell what your kids will be able to handle. You can talk about it with them, you can give them some perspective. Nothing is good or bad, but thinking makes it so. Kids need to know it's one thing to talk the talk, it's another to walk the walk. This helps them be able to make responsible decisions about what they listen to for themselves.

    Posted by Noel April 29, 09 08:54 PM
  1. I don't want kids to listen to this crap like Lil Wayne and Yin Yang Twins, etc.... not because of its obscene sexual content and violence, or its overt references to using drugs and brand name quoting alcohol, or references to useless expensive material luxury items.

    It's more because the songs are just crap, yet they are all over BILLBOARD #1.... Ive heard 8 year olds sing this stuff!! I would hate to be a parent in this day and age! MTV and BET market this junk to kids with videos that bleep the offensive lyrical content yet leave the intent of the language quite visually obvious.

    Some musicians and their promoters/distributors have no social conscience.

    But, censorship and repressing this stuff from kids is not the answer!

    Vote with your dollar. Don't support them by buying the music, even if your kids beg. If the kids want the music... they will have to spend their hard earned first job money on it. Cancel cable, if you really care.

    Posted by John April 29, 09 09:18 PM
  1. As a parent of 14 and 10 year old daughters I say you must absolutely talk with your kids about why a specific song is something that shouldn't be supported by listening or buying. My neighbors daughter (8) came over the other day and was singing "You spin me right round baby when you go down, when u go down!" Granted she didn't know this song was a reference to strippers on a pole and oral sex, but what parent wouldn't change the station when this song is played. Listening to Britney brag about how "All the boys and all the girls want to IF (F) You (U) Seek (CK) Amy (ME) is not something my kids will ever be accused of.

    Tom

    Posted by Tom April 30, 09 12:32 AM
  1. Yeah, like Flo Rida on American Idol a couple weeks ago. Think any of the young fans understand what the words to Right Round were?

    I let my kids listen to anything, but I tell them things with inappropriate language (swear words, etc) should not be played for their friends. I don't want other parents getting upset that little Susie heard F*CK in a song that Janie played on her iPod.

    My kids hear enough bad language in their house from their Mom and Dad. :)


    Now TV is a different story. Many Disney shows blocked on our TV (Zack and Cody, Hannah Montana, etc). Can't stand that insipid crap and how they portray (smart a**) kids and (dumb) parents.

    Posted by Mike April 30, 09 08:23 AM
  1. We hardly ever listen to regular radio, and we don't own a TV, so we don't have a huge problem with policing our kids music just yet (they are 8 and 7). I try to expose them to a variety - my collection includes everything from jazz to classical to folk to alternative to acapella to world music. Although I have tried to teach them to head bang to Bohemian Rhapsody, given a choice, they like to listen to Phantom of the Opera, alternating with the Cars soundtrack.

    I do save the Nine Inch Nails and Korn for when they are at school though...

    Posted by BMS April 30, 09 08:44 AM
  1. Our 11 year olds have MP3 players but they don't have their own download accounts. If they want to download music (usually via a gift card) they have to use my account and I veto anything inappropriate. Before they got into digital music, I would buy CDs from Wal-Mart (where I'm happy that they censor!) of artists who they would like but who I also like and know - Green Day, Audioslave, U2 etc. When they want to download music that I don't know, which is usually only themes from sports video games or wrestling, I take a listen first before loading it up for them.

    That said, I am a child of the late 80s so my tween/early teen years were spent listening to the likes of GNR, Bon Jovi, Poison, Metallica and other hard rock/hair bands and I'm no worse for the wear! Back then we wouldn't let play the offensive lyrics in earshot of our parents, but we were at an age where if they had banned certain bands it would have made the music more appealing. I think that once kids get to an age where they can earn their own money to buy music and can be on a computer relatively unsupervised (I'm thinking 13, 14+) then there's not much you can do but hope that your prior influence sinks in. But before that, I get veto power. Finally, one of the coolest things my mom did was chaperone my friends and me to concerts in grades 7-9 when we were too young to go alone. We all had to buy our own tickets and share the cost of hers but she was willing to drive and sit there through the show, no matter how awful the band.

    Posted by Jen April 30, 09 08:54 AM
  1. We're definitely not at the point where this is an issue with our daughter yet, but it's something I've thought about. I remember huge battles with my mother over music - not because of foul language or sexual reference but because of the overall message of undermining authority and loads of foul language. By the time I was 10, all I wanted was a mohawk and Cockney Rejects album (I'd discovered a college radio station that played mostly '77 punk).

    And now, she and I laugh about how tame the music and its message is compared to the overglorified sex and drugs overtones of today's pop.

    For now, our daughter is being raised on a diet of classical, swing and punk. I guess that's a bridge we'll have to cross when we come to it.

    Posted by phe April 30, 09 10:18 AM
  1. Er...I should use the "preview" section more often. My post should have said, "not because of violent language or sexual reference.."

    Posted by phe April 30, 09 11:08 AM
  1. "Now TV is a different story. Many Disney shows blocked on our TV (Zack and Cody, Hannah Montana, etc). Can't stand that insipid crap and how they portray (smart a**) kids and (dumb) parents."

    I totally agree! However, most people think these shows are completely harmless and all in fun. It is SO not the example I want my kids to follow. They know all their friends watch them, but they are not allowed.

    Posted by mom2boys April 30, 09 12:07 PM
  1. My son is only 2 and loves good classical music and Jazz so I am ok for now . However when I was student teaching 6th grade a lot of the girls especially were listening to Eminem. This really really bugged me because I felt he was misogynistic and I had a no Eminem policy for myself. Instead of simply telling them I thought he hated women and why I didn't listen to him we turned it into a journal writing lesson. These kids who normally wrote 3-5 lines in their journal stayed in from lunch to finish 5-6 pages of why they like him. Their points were amazing , valid and honestly opened my eyes. These were kids who could relate to his messages, and his past. I was coming from a very different viewpoint and was blind to the good things he did provide these very disenfranchised kids. They didn't get a say in much, had a hard time expressing feelings but could through listening to him. It was an amazing dialogue that I hope now that I am a parent I can remember . I won't ban any music but I will ask my child to defend their choices, and make sure they are aware of what the artist is doing, and what the lyrics mean.

    Posted by Allie April 30, 09 12:24 PM
  1. My son discovered Top 40 this year when he entered junior high. I'm probably more lax about it than a lot of parents but we do discuss lyrics and their appropriateness. We also discuss what constitutes a "good" pop song and what is drivel. Out of principal I'll switch the station when certain songs come on even though the kids have heard them before - right now it's Britney's If you seek Amy and Asher Roth's I Love College. Radio is easy to control. Pretty soon my son will have an Itunes account which I will monitor. Eventually the censorship will go away but not at age 12. I'm hoping he'll go less mainstream but meanwhile I've become far more appreciative of pop music - the kind of stuff I would have dismissed with a toss of my spiked hair during my high school days.

    Posted by Cordelia April 30, 09 12:34 PM
  1. I would encourage listening "with" your child to anything he or she enjoys. I don't approve of some of the content of The Simpson's TV show for a 7 year-old (like my daughter), but when we watch together, we have the opportunity to talk with her about what's appropriate and not. Some of the content, though, is over her head, and so we don't even "go there." When she does listen to Pink in the car, and the lyrics contain the A-word, she closes her ears and goes "yayayayayaya" over the bad lyric. Other cuts, she just skips. I'm proud of her choice. She likes the music; I like that she is developing her own taste in music and she choreographs dances to it. There's a lot of positive. The lyrics are not sufficient reason to take away from the value of the rest of it.

    That's my 2 cents.

    Posted by Dr. Eric April 30, 09 06:39 PM
  1. My mother did not censure ANYTHING I listened to, read, or watched on tv. I had all kinds of music, from Bon Jovi to Nine Inch Nails. I watched R rated movies, and if I had nightmares, that was my fault--I learned not to watch them on my own. And I could read any book I wanted because I had my own library card. I still listen to all kinds of music, read all kinds of books, and watch whatever I want, and I allow the children in my life the same luxury.

    Posted by annie May 1, 09 02:45 PM
  1. Start them early with The Beatles and let them go with they want. It's music.....enjoy it. Laughing at kid who got Green Day's Dookie for his first album, that was their first "sell out"effort.

    Posted by libertine May 2, 09 11:40 AM
  1. Libertine- I didn't say anything about Green Day's "Dookie"'s quality, or importance. It just happened to be my first CD and it also contained a lot of material some people might find inappropriate for a child, so it was worth pointing out.
    I didn't realize that the 1st CD you own has to be the best CD ever made. Get over yourself!
    What was your 1st CD?

    Posted by Noel May 5, 09 01:46 PM
  1. My mother never really censored anything with me. I grew up around the rock music she listened to (The Eagles, Kiss, AC/DC were my mom's favorites) Those are some of my favorite bands now, with the addition of Rush as my favorite band.I do not like most of music that is put out today, and no offense to anyone who does, but how, did we go from epic songs like "Hotel California" to crap like "My lip gloss is poppin'" or whatever that song is called? (and don't even get me started on this Hanna Montana crap...) If i ever have kids, I would let them make their own decisions on what they want to listen to, but I'll try to expose them to good rock music ASAP.

    Posted by Jade August 24, 09 09:50 PM
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Barbara F. Meltz is a freelance writer, parenting consultant, and author of "Put Yourself in Their Shoes: Understanding How Your Children See the World." She won several awards for her weekly "Child Caring" column in the Globe, including the 2008 American Psychological Association Print Excellence award. Barbara is available as a speaker for parent groups.

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