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Exhibits

Panopticon Gallery exhibits extended

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 19, 2012 02:22 PM
HaroldFeinsteinDiner.jpg
Man Smoking in 14th Street Diner, NYC, 1970
Photo by Harold Feinstein

Because of what organizers describe as an overwhelming response, the Panopticon Gallery, inside the Hotel Commonwealth in Kenmore Square, has decided to extend its Harold Feinstein exhibit until Jan. 8.

"Harold Feinstein | A Retrospective" displays about 50 years' worth of some of Feinstein's best-known black-and-white images, from the boardwalk at Coney Island and the streets of New York, to his tour of duty as a grunt in Korea.

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Local photo exhibits:
Russell duPont, Griffin, Panopticon ...

Posted by Teresa Hanafin August 1, 2012 10:55 AM

Some local photo exhibits worth visiting:

Toward Beacon Hill by Russell duPont
"Toward Beacon Hill"
Photo by Russell duPont
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A RAW reader asks: Where can I exhibit?

Posted by Teresa Hanafin July 1, 2011 11:30 AM

Hi,

My name is Carla and I am big fan of your RAW web page. I have a question and I thought you may be helpful.

My friend and I would like to have a photography exhibition. We are not professionals, but we would like to enjoy this experience together. We would like to have it somewhere relaxed, like a bar in the South End or something similar.

Do you have any suggestions to give us or experience with this kind of events?

Thank you so much!
Carla

So RAW Dawgs ... any suggestions for Carla?

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Somerville Open Studios this weekend

Posted by Teresa Hanafin April 27, 2011 06:00 PM

Close to 80 photographers will have their images on display this weekend during the annual Somerville Open Studios event - this year, it's being held from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

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Russell duPont photo exhibit

Posted by Teresa Hanafin April 27, 2011 04:30 PM

TheSenator.jpg

"The Senator" / Photo by Russell duPont

Local photographer Russell duPont has another intriguing exhibit: "Boston, 1960-2011: Photographs by Russell duPont", this one on display in the Main Floor Atrium Gallery of the Moakley Federal Courthouse on the Boston waterfront.

The exhibit runs through June 30, and the gallery is open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday.




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Kati Mai Seiffer exhibit in Westford

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 1, 2011 01:53 PM

SeifferMenemsha.jpg

Sunset before a storm rolled in at Menemsha Beach on Martha's Vineyard.

The opening reception for "Capturing Beauty", an exhibition of landscape and nature photography by Kati Mai Seiffer, will be held this Sunday, March 6, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Parish Center for the Arts in Westford.

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A life of approaching strangers

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 13, 2011 02:00 PM

The PBS NewsHour, via Twin Cities Public Television, profiled Minnesota photographer Alec Soth, who uses an 8x10 format camera and has an exhibit at Minneapolis' Walker Art Center.





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Photos and flowers in the Public Garden

Posted by Teresa Hanafin August 27, 2010 10:09 AM
GeorgeWashingtonStatue.jpg

By June Wulff
Globe Staff

George Washington might look down from his horse to glance at the lovely flower gallery at tomorrow's Boston Public Garden Photo Installation.

The photographers will be available to discuss their floral shots at this show presented by the Boston Photography Center.

The organization was founded to promote the art of photography, and the goal of this exhibit is to bring photography to visitors and residents of Boston. We hope you and George like it.

1 to 3 p.m. tomorrow, Saturday, Aug. 28, weather permitting. Free.
Boston Public Garden at the Washington statue, Arlington Street entrance.



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Bedford arts center exhibit

Posted by Teresa Hanafin July 26, 2010 06:02 PM
BCAThree.jpg

You may recall that this past spring, the Bedford Center for the Arts ran a series of photography workshops in its space in Old Town Hall. But when it became clear that some of the material wasn't suited for people with point-and-shoot cameras, organizer Julie Turner decided to do something about it.

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Juried exhibition at the Griffin Museum

Posted by Teresa Hanafin June 30, 2010 09:19 AM

Marina.jpg

The Griffin Museum of Photography's 16th juried exhibition is on display in the main gallery of the museum, located in Winchester, through Aug. 29. Sixty images were chosen from more than 2,000 submissions by 300 photographers. New Yorker Natalia Engelhardt, winner of the $1,000 Arthur Griffin Legacy Award, specializes in portraiture (above is a detail of her "Marina, Moscow 2007"). The $500 Griffin Award went to Keliy Anderson-Staley for "Off the Grid," a study of 30 Maine families living without electricity, plumbing, and phones. The opening reception is tomorrow (July 1) from 7 to 8:30 p.m. The museum is open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, and noon to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is $5; $2 for seniors, and free for students, kids under 12, and for everyone on Thursdays. The museum is at 67 Shore Road, Winchester, 781-729-1158.

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Points of View exhibit on Cape Cod

Posted by Teresa Hanafin May 25, 2010 12:44 PM

I was down the Cape yesterday on a day off and stopped at the Cape Cod Art Association on Route 6A in Barnstable to see an interesting new exhibit called "Points of View." It features photographs taken by members of the Cape Cod Camera Club, which is affiliated with the art association, and the interpretation of those photos by the association's painter members.

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Coleman Rogers photo exhibit

Posted by Teresa Hanafin May 16, 2010 07:09 PM
ColemanRogersBW.jpg
Photo by Coleman Rogers

Another RAW regular has a photo exhibit: Coleman Rogers opened a show this week at the Scandinavian Living Center, 206 Waltham St., West Newton. He's having a reception there from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, so if you're in the neighborhood, be sure to stop by. The exhibit ends July 5.



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Another RAW Dawg photo exhibit

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 22, 2010 04:54 PM

I'm happy to announce that another RAW regular, Kate Passaro, has a photo exhibit up at the Boston Common Coffee Co., 515 Washington St. downtown -- it's at West Street, near the Opera House and around the corner from the Brattle Book Shop.

Kate has about 25 photos on display. The exhibit, which opened March 15, will be on display through May 15, so if you weren't able to make the opening reception, stop by another time.

You may remember that Kate did one of our first On Assignments, at the Bradley Estate in Canton.


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Lowell National Park photo contest

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 19, 2010 05:44 PM

I've been out of town for several days, and returned today to find an email from our friend Jonathan Parker, a park ranger at the Lowell National Historical Park who ran a photo contest starting last fall. Well, the contest is over and the winners have been chosen.

Here's more about the contest from the park service, as well as information about how to see the winning photos:

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Rock 'n' roll photo exhibit at Worcester Art Museum

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 1, 2010 01:59 PM
JimiHendrix.jpg
William "PoPsie" Randolph, Jimi Hendrix, and Wilson Pickett, May 5, 1966

Photo by Michael Randolph

RAW regular Caroline Brogen wrote to suggest that we highlight an interesting photo exhibit at the Worcester Art Museum: "Selections from Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955 to the Present."

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Photos of Barack Obama exhibit

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 1, 2010 12:36 PM

Barack Obama by Derrick JacksonPhoto by Derrick Jackson, Globe Staff

A photo exhibit at the Museum of African American History in Boston is coming to a close soon, but two closing receptions next week offer an excuse to see the show before it ends.

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Horenstein has an eye for form

Posted by Angela Nelson, Boston.com Staff February 1, 2010 02:15 PM

By Cate McQuaid
Globe Correspondent

If you know Henry Horenstein as an animal photographer, you may be surprised by ''Show,'' his exhibit of burlesque performers, on view at Walker Contemporary in association with Robert Klein Gallery. But Horenstein has always been a documentary photographer, and in 2001 he happened into the Shim-Sham Club in New Orleans, where he saw the first  Tease-O-Rama event, and shot, among others Dita Von Teese.  He had stumbled into the neo-burlesque revival and was captivated. The exhibit marks the release of his new book on the subject.

burlesque.jpgHis black-and-white images are mostly grainy. The portrait ''Jackie Beat, California Institute of Abnormalarts, (CIA), Los Angeles, CA,''  sports a shallow focus, blurring certain features and heightening the sense of theatrical surrealism. Jackie Beat's nose nearly disappears, but her extraordinary eyelashes drop vividly, like dark waterfalls. Her artfully composed makeup includes swooping eyebrows and lips painted in a metallic sheen. She wears a skullcap with horizontal stripes.

One wall features confrontational close-ups: a single eye, a mouth, breasts. The mouth in ''Amber Ray, Los Angeles, CA'' is a mix of repulsive and glamorous. Under a notably hairy upper lip, teeth glistening with saliva bite the glittering bottom lip. It's a fierce image. Horenstein has always had a discerning eye for form, foiling expectations and finding unusual beauty in his subjects. The burlesque performers exaggerate form with their over-the-top style, and Horenstein goes along with that, but he doesn't let it distract or seduce him. He's more interested in what he sees than in what he is being shown, and that's what makes him so good.


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Playing with faces and figures

Posted by Angela Nelson, Boston.com Staff January 13, 2010 05:29 AM
Howard Yezerski Gallery has a short history of photographer Gary Schneider's figure work, featuring nudes and portraits that date back to the 1970s. The earliest pieces take a minimalist view of the body, homing in on tiny portions. ''Nina Portrait Sequence II'' (1975) is a series of small black-and-white images of creases, edges, and passages of skin and hair. They're clever, but dry and perfunctory beside the more expressive later work.

Gary-Schneider-2.jpg.jpgSchneider started taking close-cropped portraits in black and white in the late 1980s, drawing over his subjects' faces with a flashlight. Then he moved into color work, and over the years he has pushed his tones more and more. He shot nudes for a New York Times Magazine story on obesity in 2006. ''Omar'' was photographed while the subject snoozed, with his hand on his chest. He has a farmer's tan, and every texture on his pale chest pops - hairs, blemishes, tiny scabs. His lips and cheek are hot pink; he looks fevered and angelic.

The tones are similarly lurid in Schneider's most recent portraits. ''Tom W.'' (left) has freckles that suggest skin disease; his nose is red. The flashlight shows off his high cheekbones and brilliant blue eyes. These works haunt, marrying attention to classical beauty with a bizarre luster that both flatters and maligns.

Gary Schneider: "Drawn From Life" at Howard Yezerski Gallery,  460 Harrison Ave., through Feb. 9. 617-262-0550, www.howardyezerskigallery.com.

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Endless days in Iceland

Posted by Angela Nelson, Boston.com Staff December 11, 2009 10:56 AM
Julia Hechtman spent her summer photographing Iceland. She didn't want to just shoot the majestic landscape; she wanted to make images that were not postcard-perfect but integrated her experience there. She focuses, in her exhibit at LaMontagne Gallery, on figures in the landscape.

Hechtman.jpg Hechtman also took 10 of her favorite movies with her to Iceland, to divide, she says in her artist's statement, summer days that never ended. The films are the ground upon which she builds her photos, borrowing images, or sometimes just moods, from ''Cool Hand Luke,'' ''Harold and Maude,'' and ''Black Robe,'' among others. It's as if in those endless days, she entered a netherworld of filmic dreams and fantasy that even a swift hike couldn't shake off.

The photos are beautiful, with an Iceland summer's diamond gleam. Hechtman's ''Harold and Maude'' quotes a familiar shot of two figures, side by side, seen from behind, here humbled against the backdrop of a forever sky. ''Lost in Translation'' presents an enormous leap, from the Tokyo streetscapes where that film was set to a mossy Icelandic hummock upon which a man sprawls in his parka. No, he's not Bill Murray on his hotel bed, but there's a quality of desolation that's familiar.

These films are a common currency; they bring something familiar to the stark, unfamiliar Icelandic landscape and help us find our place there, alongside the artist.

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Exhibit by RAW Dawg Coleman Rogers

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 18, 2009 11:30 AM
 
Coleman Rogers

Newton photographer and RAW regular Coleman Rogers is showing a variety of work at the gallery at NewTV in the Newton Communication Access Center through Jan. 15.

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Destinations: 'Who Shot Rock & Roll' in N.Y.

Posted by Angela Nelson, Boston.com Staff October 22, 2009 01:10 PM

By Mark Feeney, Globe Staff

''Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955 to the Present'': Image has been as much a part of rock 'n' roll as sound right from the beginning. If Elvis hadn't looked like Elvis he wouldn't have been, well . . . Elvis, would he? Or imagine the Beatles with crewcuts, Bob Dylan with a double chin. Not easy to do. This Brooklyn Museum exhibition gathers images of rock performers from the '50s to the present. Included are such highly photogenic subjects as Tina Turner, Mick Jagger, and Little Richard, and such less photogenic ones as Radiohead, Sonic Youth, and Amy Winehouse. The exhibition emphasizes the photographers (among them are Henry Diltz, Baron Wolman, and Albert Watson) as much as the performers. There's also a section dealing with an overlooked element in the visual impact of rock: the fans out in the audience and their responses to music.

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Belin's photos spotlight creativity, individuality

Posted by Teresa Hanafin October 22, 2009 12:05 PM
 
belin1.jpg

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

A very different sense of style and fashion is on display in "Valerie Belin: Made Up." Belin is a French photographer, and this is her first US solo show. There are 17 pictures in the show, and they're very large. Most are in the vicinity of 5 feet by 4 feet.

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Hingham photographer has exhibit at town library

Posted by Teresa Hanafin October 6, 2009 08:27 AM
 
Rainbow by Susan Hagstrom
"Rainbow" by Susan Hagstrom

The current exhibit at the Hingham Public Library showcases images of lesser-known places of beauty in the town and elsewhere by photographer Susan Hagstrom.

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Another RAW Dawg's exhibit

Posted by Teresa Hanafin September 24, 2009 12:13 PM

Pat Glennon of Rockland, a RAW Photographer of the Week and First Place winner of the "April Showers" contest, will have his first-ever photo exhibit at the Rockland Memorial Library next month. Woo-hoo!

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RAW Dawg exhibiting at the Boston Arts Festival

Posted by Teresa Hanafin September 10, 2009 03:25 PM

If you're looking for something to do this weekend, go support a fellow RAW Dawg: Northeastern student Daniel Brim, a RAW regular whose photo of the waterfall Dettifoss in Iceland captured First Place in our July "Ripples" contest, will be showing his photographs at The Boston Arts Festival (also known as the Boston Ahts Festival) this weekend at Columbus Park on the North End waterfront.

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Armenian photo exhibit

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 24, 2009 03:50 PM

The Armenian National Committee of Massachusetts and the Armenian Library and Museum of America is hosting a photography exhibit at the State House on Beacon Hill this week. The exhibit, called "iwitness," documents the oral histories and black-and-white portraits of survivors of the Armenian genocide by Los Angeles-based photographers Ara Oshagan and Levon Parian. The exhibit is free and runs through Friday. It then will move to the Armenian Library and Museum of America, 65 Main St., Watertown, where it will be on display from April 2 through May.

- Christina Pazzanese

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A clear lens on distorted values

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 24, 2009 11:10 AM
AivaFirstDay.jpg AivaLastDay.jpg
The girls Lauren Greenfield photographed for her exhibit ''Thin'' were at a residential facility that treats eating disorders. Above: Aiva, 16, on her first day (left) and after 10 weeks. (Photos by Lauren Greenfield)

A photographer's unsettling look at girls' culture

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

NORTHAMPTON - There were 1,600 people in my college freshman class, so it took a lot to stand out. One woman did. Among all those well-fed young faces, she looked as though she could have been her own grandmother: face drawn, skin wizened, fingers as bony as claws. Her appearance seemed strange, of course; but being your basic 18-year-old guy - meaning, a dolt - I thought nothing further of it. When she returned next fall, moon-faced and pudgy, even I understood. She had been anorexic.

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"Double Exposure" in Newburyport

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 19, 2009 10:30 PM
 
Double Exposure
Two Newburyport High School students were chosen to exhibit at the Firehouse Center for the Arts in Newburyport, in a juried process that picked their work over many others, including some veteran professionals. Jackson Potter and Shane Levi Silverstein combine their efforts in "Double Exposure," on display through March 29. A reception with the artists is from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday (March 21). The show presents a new take on photographic portraits and landscapes. Jackson has exhibited at the Newburyport Art Association and worked extensively with G118, a
student gallery he helped organize at the high school. You can see more of his photos on his Flickr page. Shane also has exhibited at the art association. He's treasurer of the high school art gallery and has interned with local professional photographer Dawn Norris. His Flickr page is here.
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Chinese characters

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 14, 2009 05:48 PM
 
Two Miners
"Two Miners, Datong, Shanxi Province" by Liu Zheng

Photographer Liu Zheng is drawn to the outsiders in his homeland

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

WILLIAMSTOWN - Imagine trying to represent US society photographically, and in just 120 images - black-and-white images, at that. Even if you gave yourself seven years to do it, the task would still be overwhelming.

Now imagine trying to do the same for China, a society vastly older, far more populous, and undergoing a transformation so rapid as to make the American experience of change seem plodding. Yet that's what photographer Liu Zheng undertook between the years 1994 and 2001. The results can be seen in "Liu Zheng: The Chinese," which runs at the Williams College Museum of Art through April 26.

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A radiant 'Renaissance'

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 11, 2009 04:20 PM
 
Renaissance 1004
"Renaissance 1004" by Bill Armstrong

Exhibit stresses pure form and color

By Cate McQuaid
Globe Correspondent

Leonardo da Vinci coined the painting term "sfumato" to refer to the blurring of usually sharp outlines to create a sense of depth. It was one of several techniques that contributed to the idealized realism - the spaciousness, the gorgeously described bodies - of Renaissance painting.

Photographer Bill Armstrong borrows images from the Renaissance in his exhibit at Gallery Kayafas, and, blurring the edges, vaults them into the realm of contemporary art.

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Highs from Charlie Lowe

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 8, 2009 09:17 PM

From 1957 to 1981, whatever happened in Gloucester - from fires to football games, politics to parades, kids playing to fishermen at work - was captured on film by Gloucester Daily Times photographer Charlie Lowe. An archive of about 40,000 of Lowe's photographs was donated by the paper to the Cape Ann Museum and has now been electronically digitalized by the museum's photo archivist, Fred Buck:

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Civil engagement

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 8, 2009 08:17 PM
 
Crew of Union Gunboat, 1864
The crew of the U.S.S. Miami on its main deck. Photographer unknown.

Photos reveal the daily life and hard truths of the War Between the States

Through April 26, the Medford Historial Society is hosting "Of the People: Faces of the Civil War," an exhibit featuring 50 photographs exemplifying often-overlooked aspects of that war. Globe Correspondent Jon Dyer visited the exhibit:

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"Artist of the Month" at the Dover Town Library

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 8, 2009 07:47 PM

Award-winning photographer Beth Hoffer of Holliston is the "Artist of the Month" being featured at the Dover Town Library. "Every Picture Tells a Story" showcases her photos of New England scenes. The monthly exhibition is sponsored by the Friends of the Library as a fund-raiser, with the organization receiving 10 percent of any sales of Hoffer's photos. You can see more of Hoffer's work on her website.

-Anna Fiorentino


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Peering into the studios of the creative

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 7, 2009 11:46 AM
 
John Singer Sargent in his Paris studio
John Singer Sargent in his studio at 41 Blvd. Berthier in Paris
with his famous painting "Madame X".

"Artists in Their Studios," which runs at the Norman Rockwell Museum through May 25, brings together more than 50 photographs of painters and sculptors in their artistic homes away from home. The Globe's Mark Feeney reviewed the exhibit:

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Taking sides

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 6, 2009 10:34 AM
 
Untitled photo from In and Out exhibit
Photo by Tom Wojciechowski

The Fort Point Arts Community Gallery opens a two-sided photography show today that features light coming in - and more light going out. On one side of the gallery, you'll see Martin Berinstein's images of moving bubbles that let light in. On the other side, you'll see Tom Wojciechowski's flash-heavy photographs of light reflecting off shiny surfaces such as ice, glass, and cars. That's the light going out. Not surprisingly, the show is called "In and Out." Through April 10. Reception Thursday from 5:30 to 8 p.m.; Artists' Talk at 6:30 p.m. March 19. FPAC Gallery, 300 Summer St., Boston. 617-423-4299.

- Meredith Goldstein

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Endicott exhibit explores Czech and Slovak images

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 5, 2009 05:15 PM
 
CSHandsSlovakMadonna.jpg
Anyone who has read Kafka or Milan Kundera has experienced something of Bohemia's special quality of dark playfulness - or should that be playful darkness?

So, too, will anyone who sees the 30 images in "20th-Century Czech and Slovak Photography." It runs at Endicott College's Center for the Visual and Performing Arts through March 31.

Left, "Hands, Slovak Madonna" by Tibor Honty.

A review by Mark Feeney of the Globe:

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Weaving together his Vietnam

Posted by Teresa Hanafin March 4, 2009 10:15 AM
 
Persistence of Memory
"Persistence of Memory #11" by Dinh Q. Le

Photo tapestries explore war and identity

"A Tapestry of Memories: The Art of Dinh Q. Le" at the Tufts University Art Gallery showcases photo weavings by Dinh Q. Le. Globe correspondent Cate McQuaid reviewed the exhibit:

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Views of Boston as it was - and as it is

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 28, 2009 10:06 AM
 
Callahan Tunnel Sign
"Central Artery demolition, Callahan Tunnel sign, 2004" / Photo by Peter Vanderwarker

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

For many years, Robert Campbell and Peter Vanderwarker's "Cityscapes" feature was a mainstay of The Boston Globe Magazine. It consisted of a brief chunk of text about some site in the city along with a pair of photographs: one then, one now. The thens were archival. Vanderwarker had taken the nows. The pictures made plain how much Vanderwarker savors cities, this one especially.

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Mark your calendar

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 25, 2009 01:17 PM

An exhibit of photographs by Henry Horenstein, called "Animalia", opens at the Robert Klein Gallery Friday and runs through March 28. Here's a gallery of images from the related book.

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Brockton Views

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 25, 2009 12:48 PM
 
Jose Diaz
The photograph entitled "Jose Diaz" (left) is among the photographs featured in an exhibition by Brockton native Mary Beth Meehan, entitled "City of Champions." The show is taking place at the Oresman Gallery, Smith College Department of Art, in Northampton through Saturday. The photos show her hometown of Brockton and explore the personal effects of the global economic and cultural changes under way there. Meehan is a former photographer for the Providence Journal and
freelancer for the Globe, and is currently a 2009 Photography Fellow with the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts.
-- PAUL A. KANDARIAN

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A photographer's study of the humble egg and nest

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 25, 2009 11:50 AM
 
Egg and Nest exhibit
Photo by Rosamond Purcell

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

It's a putdown to describe something as being "for the birds." The 32 photographs in Rosamond Purcell's "Egg & Nest" suggest there should be a comparable term, "from the birds." It would be anything but a putdown. How could it be? Purcell's pictures of these quintessential avian products are that distinctive, that elegant. The show runs through March 15 at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.

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Shining light on Rwanda victims

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 24, 2009 07:32 PM
 
Odette with her son Martin
"Odette with her son Martin" / Photo by Jonathan Torgovnik

By Denise Taylor
Globe Correspondent

The colors in Jonathan Torgovnik's photographs tend toward rich, welcoming hues. The light often shimmers warmly. But the tense, somber stares of his portrait subjects tug the viewer out of this safe scenery and into something hurt, dark, and hollow. Even before reading the sobering texts beneath the images, it is hard not to want to look away - but Torgovnik asks you not to.

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Photos of the Renaissance

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 10, 2009 04:40 PM
 
Sir Isaac Newton
"The Mathemagician" / Portrait of Sir Isaac Newton with manuscript

Photographer Eva Timothy has said that folks like Sir Isaac Newton and Galileo were not much different than we are. "These people were not simply born to greatness," she says. "They were individuals who cultivated such a powerful sense of creative curiosity that nothing could stop them from fulfilling their desires for discovery." Satisfy your creative curiosity at Timothy's "Lost in Learning" visual investigation of the Renaissance through black-and-white photos of great historical figures positioned alongside their manuscripts and artifacts. Through March 20; talk and reception at 6 p.m. Friday (Feb. 13). Free. The New England Institute of Art Gallery on the Plaza, Washington Street at Route 9, Brookline. 617-582-4617.

-- JUNE WULFF

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It's a matter of time

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 10:21 PM

"Roxbury Community College Library Celebrates African American History Month" is a month-plus work of art. In a 34-foot-long photo display titled "A Timeline of African American History," visitors can follow history starting with the arrival of the first Africans to Jamestown, Va., in 1619 and ending with the election of our new president. Through March 15. Free. Roxbury Community College Library, 1234 Columbus Ave., Roxbury. 617-541-5323.

-- JUNE WULFF, Globe Staff

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Recalling the primal scream of the hardcore scene

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 08:46 PM
 
DYS at The Channel
DYS at the Channel in Boston, 1983. Photo by Gail Rush / ''Radio Silence''
(See a photo gallery at the end of the story)

By Jonathan Perry
Globe Correspondent

As a teenager growing up in Salem, N.H., in the late '80s, Anthony Pappalardo began sneaking out to metal shows - in Boston, Lowell, Framingham, anywhere - every chance he got. The music was loud and aggressive, and it spoke to him - but not nearly as loudly or aggressively as hardcore did.

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His best shots for charity

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 06:33 PM
 
Leighton O'Connor photo
Photo illustration by Leighton O'Connor

By Wendy Killeen
Globe Correspondent

When it came time for Beverly's Leighton O'Connor to make his annual contribution to North Shore United Way, the marine and travel photographer took a different approach.

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Father-and-son photographers reimagine the elements

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 06:02 PM
 
Pull of Gravity
Photo by Elijah Gowin

Emmet and Elijah Gowin make the unreal out of earth, air, and water

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

WINCHESTER - Emmet Gowin and Elijah Gowin are father and son. Although they don't collaborate, they've previously exhibited together. "Pull of Gravity: Photographs by Emmet Gowin and Elijah Gowin" shows what a complementary pairing their work makes for. It runs at the Griffin Museum of Photography through March 29.

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Piecing together a long-lost portrait

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 05:32 PM
 
Lincoln.jpg
Abraham Lincoln was photographed by Alexander Hesler on June 3, 1860.
(Photo courtesy George Eastman House via Associated Press)

By Ben Dobbin
Associated Press

ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Seated by a window in the Illinois State Capitol in 1860, a beardless, bow-tied Abraham Lincoln held still for 25 seconds for what would become a classic campaign portrait of the soon-to-be president. It was undoubtedly a personal favorite.

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Photos from Borneo

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 05:07 PM

Photographs of the landscapes and people of Borneo by Ginger Teal of West Newbury are being exhibited at the GAR Memorial Library in her hometown through Feb. 28. Teal shot the photos while in the country as a volunteer for Habitat for Humanity. The library is at 490 West Main St. 978-363-1105.

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Inaugural photo exhibit at new Endicott arts center

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 04:57 PM

"20th Century Czech and Slovak Photography" is one of the inaugural exhibits on display at the new Center for Visual and Performing Arts at Endicott College in Beverly.

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Another reason to get out

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 03:56 PM
 
Farm Market
Photography isn't the first thing you associate with Dartmouth College. But two of America's finest living photographers are alumni (Joel Sternfeld and James Nachtwey), and shortly before he died Walker Evans was an artist in residence there. So it makes perfect sense that Dartmouth's Hood Museum of Art, Hanover, N.H., should have an impressive photography collection.
The Hood has drawn on that collection for "Focus on Photography: Works From 1950 to Today." It runs through March 8. The show's breadth is considerable. Photographers with work in "Focus on Photography" range from Lotte Jacobi, who was born in the 1890s, to Nikki Lee, who had her first one-person show in the 1990s. Sternfeld ("McLean, Virginia Pumpkins", above) and Nachtwey are in it, too, of course. 603-646-2808.
- MARK FEENEY, Globe Staff

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A shared vision, but different views

Posted by Teresa Hanafin February 7, 2009 02:22 PM

Robert Festa and Kristin Mallery first crossed paths at the Footlight Club's annual holiday fair about a year ago. The two longtime Jamaica Plain residents and fledgling photographers were both peddling original prints ranging from close-up scenes to panoramic portraits.

They found, much to their surprise, that they also each had a photo of the same row of houses in Portsmouth, N.H.

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His focus is on shooting hoops

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 29, 2009 05:12 PM
 
White River Junction
"White River Junction" by David S. Greenfield

By Denise Taylor
Globe Correspondent

One basketball hoop stands alone before a vast cornfield. The next pops up unexpectedly in a forest, its rim slapped onto a sheet of plywood and nailed to two trees. Another sturdy hoop abuts a stone bomb shelter in Israel, the backboard's white rectangle echoed in the shape of warning sirens tucked into nearby trees.

For the past five years, Newton photographer David S. Greenfield has turned his lens on a cultural icon that he says "cuts across all strata" - the basketball hoop. It's a simple theme, but in his solo show, "Hoopla: Basketball Rims Are Everywhere!" which opens Tuesday at the Newton Free Library, Greenfield captures more than metal rings and backboards. His striking black-and-white and color images kick up that easy sense of hope and unity that erupts on so many basketball courts. At the same time, they telegraph the simple beauty of one net and one rim.

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Moving books

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 27, 2009 04:39 PM

By Cate McQuaid
Globe Correspondent

The photographer Olivia Parker's mystical confabulations at Robert Klein Gallery begin with old texts: an Ethiopian book of curses, a child's manuscript, and tribal books from Southeast Asia, among others. Working with a digital camera and further manipulating her images in Photoshop, Parker imbues these texts with light; they glimmer.

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Traveling man

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 27, 2009 04:10 PM
MichaelMilicia.jpg

Michael Milicia is a traveling man. The Bedford resident combs the United States and Canada to capture wildlife, "a never-ending challenge," according to the award-winning photographer. His exhibit and sale at the Wayside Inn Gallery is a collection of 19 images of birds.
Through Feb. 28; 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. Free.
Wayside Inn Gallery, Longfellow's Wayside Inn, 72 Wayside Inn Road, Sudbury. 978-443-1776
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Connect Four

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 27, 2009 03:52 PM
 
Dancing Antelope #1
"Dancing Antelope #1" by Will Tenney

The four artists exhibiting in "The View From Here", a show at Springstep in Medford, blur the lines between realistic and abstract, natural and man-made, and personal and universal. Medford photographers Will Tenney and David Harris join forces with photographer Lisa Tang Liu of Quincy and Newton sculptor Paul Sears to juxtapose their photographs and sculpture and reveal visual connections. Tenney's shots of rock formations (such as "Dancing Antelope" above) show a variety of patterns, colors, and forms illustrating a contrast with their hard composition. Sears's wood sculpture resembles a flowy piece of fabric.
Springstep, 98 George P. Hassett Drive, Medford 781-395-0402
8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday
Exhibit on display through April 13. Free.

-- BOSTON GLOBE

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Griffin Museum juried show

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 26, 2009 05:40 PM

Kati Seiffer writes to tell us about the Griffin Museum of Photography's 15th Juried Exhibition. They are accepting entries from Feb. 1 to March 31, and each photographer can submit up to five images for consideration. You have to join the museum to enter, and if you do so during February, you can submit six images.

For guidelines for digital and print submissions, captions, and entry fees, visit:
http://www.griffinmuseum.org/downloads/15thJuriedExhibition.pdf

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Women/Sisters/Friends

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 25, 2009 10:15 PM

"Women/Sisters/Friends," an exhibit of black and white portraits by photographer Richard Warren Buckley, opens at the Marblehead Arts Association this Saturday (Jan. 31) and runs through Feb. 22. An opening reception will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. next Sunday (Feb. 1). Buckley, of Marblehead, was the 2008 winner of the Marblehead Festival of Arts Best in Show and the People's Choice awards for color photography. Marblehead Arts Association, 8 Hooper St., Marblehead. 781-631-2608

-- WENDY KILLEEN, Globe North

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Take a good look

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 25, 2009 09:58 PM
 
Gaze exhibit

If you visit the current Singer Editions Gallery portrait photography show, "Gaze", you'll notice that every subject in the display is staring straight forward. That's because the "Gaze" title refers to a scientific discovery that your brain processes a person's face better when they're staring right at you. Artists include Blake Fitch, who captures the puzzling gaze of a young woman on a staircase (above), and Ashley McDowell, whose shot features the gaze of her Nana. The show is up through May 1. Singer Editions Gallery, 300 Summer St., Boston. 617-423-3484

-- MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN, Globe Staff

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Black-and-white world

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 25, 2009 09:45 PM

JOHN COPLANS + AMANDA MEANS: Distilled
Howard Yezerski Gallery
460 Harrison Ave.
Through Feb. 3
617-262-0550

By Cate McQuaid
Globe Correspondent

Photographers Amanda Means and John Coplans became friends more than 20 years ago, but they've never shown together before. Coplans, a generation older than Means, died in 2003. Their work at Howard Yezerski Gallery looks exquisite and shares a fascination with a monumental look at small, ordinary things - a vision that pushes toward abstraction.

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Puerto Rico to Peru

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 25, 2009 08:58 PM
 
DPaez Peru
"Aguas Calientes (Peru)" / Photo by David Paez

Boston-based artist David E. Paez is exhibiting his photos documenting his trek through several Latin American countries, including Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, and Peru. His exhibit, "Viajes," is showing through March 4 at Casa de la Cultura / Center for Latino Arts, 85 West Newton St., Boston, 617-927-1742. A talk by the artist is scheduled for 6 to 8 p.m. Feb. 18.

-- MAGGIE CASSIDY, Globe City Weekly

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Plan ahead for this MoMA exhibit in NY

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 24, 2009 03:41 PM

"Into the Sunset: Photography's Image of the American West": New York's Museum of Modern Art brings together some 120 photographs in this exploration of how America's most photogenic region has been seen through the camera lens. Artists with work in the show include Timothy O'Sullivan, Carleton E. Watkins, Edward Weston, Robert Adams, and Cindy Sherman.
March 29 through June 8
11 West 53d St., NY
212-708-9400
www.moma.org

-- MARK FEENEY, Globe Staff

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Portland exhibit frames rock 'n' roll history

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 9, 2009 05:20 PM
 
The Beatles
The Beatles in a chromogenic print, the photographer and date unknown,
on exhibit at the Portland Museum of Art.

By Hilary Nangle
Globe Correspondent

PORTLAND, Maine - Rock 'n' roll will never die; photographs and the memories of those who snapped them assure its immortality. "Backstage Pass: Rock & Roll Photography" at the Portland Museum of Art presents nearly 300 rarely seen portraits of rock legends, from Chuck Berry to Kurt Cobain, Aretha Franklin to Madonna, the Ramones to the Rolling Stones.

(See photo gallery at the end of the story.)

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Seeing green

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 9, 2009 12:49 PM
 
Green Monster on barn
Artist M-C Lamarre signs a Green Monster mural she painted
on a barn in Waterbury, Conn. / Photo by Bob Falcetti, Republican-American

M-C Lamarre's muse is a ballpark - Fenway Park, to be specific...

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Photo exhibit shares life of Holocaust survivor

Posted by Teresa Hanafin January 3, 2009 12:58 PM
 
Israel Arbeiter
Israel Arbeiter

By Paul E. Kandarian
Globe Correspondent

Israel Arbeiter is 83, and the memory of Nazis taking him away from his parents, who would die in a German death camp, has never for a moment left him. His father's last words were, "Carry on the Jewish life and Jewish traditions."

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Sights and the city fantastic

Posted by Teresa Hanafin December 30, 2008 02:24 PM
 
Legs of Woman Walking Across Manhole Cover
"Untitled (Legs of Woman Walking Across Manhole Cover, New York City, 1939)"
Photo by Rudy Burckhardt

Two exhibits in New York ponder the truths of illumination and illusion

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

NEW YORK - Switzerland, that bastion of numbered bank accounts, prides itself on sobriety no less than profitability. Yet the writers and artists it has produced (Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Herman Hesse, Paul Klee, Jean-Luc Godard, Robert Frank) tend to be at least slightly cuckoo - just like the clock Orson Welles says in "The Third Man" is the country's only great achievement. Also, they tend to emigrate.

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Of the people, for the people

Posted by Teresa Hanafin December 29, 2008 03:06 PM
 
Rogovin - Woman on a couch
''Buffalo Lower West Side (woman on couch)'' / 1960, Milton Rogovin

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

Optometrists correct vision. So it's natural Milton Rogovin had optometry for a day job. His ambition with a camera was to correct vision, too. "The rich have their own photographers," he likes to say. "I photograph the forgotten ones."

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Biking -- and photographing -- the USA

Posted by Teresa Hanafin December 14, 2008 10:44 AM

Holliston resident Dominic Casserly, a Massachusetts College of Art graduate, has been combining his love of photography and adventure since 2006, when he photographed a 600-mile adventure race called Primal Quest for a website, and realized he had some talent. Not long after, Casserly embarked on a cross-country trip, driving to national parks and going on multiday back-country camping expeditions while documenting his journey in photographs. Then, earlier this year, he and a friend spent three months biking 4,500 miles from San Francisco to Key West, Fla. Casserly's photographs are on exhibit this month at the Holliston Public Library, where a reception with the artist will be held tomorrow (Monday the 15th) from 7 to 8 p.m.

-- MEGAN MCKEE

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Documenting life on the Ghana shore

Posted by Teresa Hanafin December 14, 2008 10:21 AM
 
Untitled (Kokrobitey #3
"Untitled (Kokrobitey #3)" by Lyle Ashton Harris

By Cate McQuaid
Globe Correspondent

Photographer Lyle Ashton Harris is best known for his self-portraits - unnerving, provocative pieces in which he dons costumes to push at the edges of Americans' assumptions about race and sexuality. Lately, though, Harris has been working in Ghana, photographing street scenes, markets, and the beach.

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A long way from Mayberry

Posted by Teresa Hanafin December 14, 2008 09:32 AM
 
Freeways
"Untitled #11 (Freeways)" by Catherine Opie
(Courtesy of the Artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles)

Catherine Opie's work takes in a whole country

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

NEW YORK - The most famous Opie in American culture, a cute little tow-head, is the son of the widowed sheriff of a small North Carolina town, Mayberry. Far from any city, it's full of folks with names like Goober and Aunt Bee, all of them ardently straight and sexually oblivious.

Catherine Opie is no relation.

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Pride and prejudice

Posted by Teresa Hanafin December 13, 2008 07:30 PM
 
Phone
"Phone 25 cents (Broadway and Glen Street)" by Ellen Feldman

East Somerville residents hope photo exhibit
changes the neighborhood's rough reputation

By Danielle Dreilinger
Globe Correspondent

For many people in the western two-thirds of Somerville, the McGrath Highway might as well be an ocean. On its far reaches, bounded by Interstate 93, Charlestown, and Washington Street, lies mysterious East Somerville.

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Power meets vulnerability

Posted by Teresa Hanafin December 13, 2008 05:28 PM
 
Actions Speak
''Actions Speak,'' a mural by THINK AGAIN at the Worcester Art Museum

Wall mural and exhibit at the Worcester Art Museum tackle social issues

By Cate McQuaid
Globe Correspondent

WORCESTER - Three microphones appear in "Actions Speak," the new giant mural by the artist duo THINK AGAIN at the Worcester Art Museum. One caked with lipstick lies beside a second covered with a red condom. The third hangs bare over a pile of human bones, as if waiting for the dead to rise and speak. Ashes and salt fill the background with a grim black and white. Text floats down beside the first two microphones: "smear," "violate," "misquote," and more aversive words.

It's the latest installation in the "Wall at WAM" series, for which the museum invites artists to fill a 17-by-67-foot expanse in its Renaissance Court, overlooking sixth-century Roman mosaics. The piece - a hybrid of photography, drawing, etching, and sculpture, all captured in a digital print - is a shocking, sobering work, impressive not only in scale, but in its gorgeous detail. For all its darkness, "Actions Speak" has an allure that makes it hard to turn away.

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Capturing hope and destruction

Posted by Teresa Hanafin December 9, 2008 10:20 AM
 
Darfur
"Darfur (Boys and Tree)" / Photo by Ron Haviv

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

WINCHESTER - It's hard for a title to set the bar higher than "Humankind."

Modeled on the landmark 1955 Museum of Modern Art exhibition "The Family of Man," it shares its predecessor's forthright support of the party of humanity and commitment to social uplift. But "Humankind," which runs at the Griffin Museum of Photography through Jan. 11, labors under three severe disadvantages.

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South of normal

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 30, 2008 10:57 AM
 
Tricycle, Memphis
The William Eggleston retrospective at the Whitney in New York includes
his photographs of a tricycle and approximately 150 other images.
(Photos courtesy of the Eggleston Artistic Trust)

William Eggleston exhibit presents the casual as classic

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

NEW YORK - What may be the most notable art photograph of the last 40 years shows a tricycle. That's it, a toddler's three-wheeler. It's kind of ratty, too, a definite Toys 'R Us reject. Sure, you can also see two ranch houses and a car in a breezeway, they're in the background, and a patch of dead grass, some asphalt, and a mess of gray sky. But the entire scene is all very, well, negligible.

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Upcoming exhibit in DC: "The Americans"

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 30, 2008 10:06 AM
 
Robert Frank
"Parade - Hoboken, New Jersey", 1955 / Photo by Robert Frank

If you're planning a trip to Washington, DC after the new year -- to visit relatives, infuse the kids with some history, see the cherry blossoms, or -- lucky you -- attend the presidential inauguration, make it a point to stop by the National Gallery of Art to see an exhibit of photos from Robert Frank's seminal work, "The Americans."

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A constant presence

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 29, 2008 02:33 PM
 
Eleanor, New York
Harry Callahan's many photographs of his wife Eleanor
include this one taken in New York in 1945.
(Courtesy of Pace/MacGill Gallery; Harry Callahan Estate)

Medium and muse come together in exhibit of Harry Callahan photos

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

PROVIDENCE - There have been two great husband-and-wife acts in photographic history. The better-known is Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe. Over the course of 20 years, he took more than 350 photographs of her. The other is Harry and Eleanor Callahan. He took so many photographs of her it's impossible to give an accurate tally. It's equally impossible to imagine Callahan's career without those photographs as part of it.

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Globe review: Tracing the outlines of time

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 28, 2008 10:05 AM
 
Cummins Solstice Lunch
"Solstice Lunch with Lee, Tate Modern, London..." by Rebecca Cummins

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

In "Four Quartets," T.S. Eliot writes that "to apprehend/ The point of intersection of the timeless/ With time, is an occupation for the saint." Saints have other things on their minds, as well: salvation, halos, whatever. Photographers can be more single-minded. For them, apprehending -- and recording -- that intersection is the occupation.

Arresting time is so central to photography that we simply take that centrality for granted. Among the virtues of "Keeping Time: Cycle and Duration in Contemporary Photography," which runs at the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University through Jan. 25, is the reminder it brings that time is not just the ocean that photography splashes in, but also the spray that it raises. The seven photographers here all make explicit the function of temporality in their medium, and do so with means as varied as sunsets and cellphones, smoking cameras and drawn-on tablecloths.

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Globe review: Bodies of work

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 23, 2008 01:03 PM
 
Boston Common
"Boston Common (Men Sleeping on Grass)" by Henri Cartier-Bresson
Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts

MFA opens Herb Ritts Gallery with eclectic "Photographic Figures"

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

"Photographic Figures" is a dual celebration: of the human body and of photography at the Museum of Fine Arts. The show, which comprises 78 images from the museum's collection, some recently acquired, helps inaugurate the Herb Ritts Gallery, the MFA's first permanent exhibition space for photography.

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A visual quartet

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 23, 2008 01:02 PM

Four shows, two venues, and lots of photographers to check out at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester.

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Globe review: Eyes on the prize

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 23, 2008 12:20 PM
 
Defiant
"Defiant" by Rania Matar, 2006, 24 x 36 in. / Courtesy of Gallery Kayafas, Boston

At the ICA, one Foster finalist focuses on photography

By Sebastian Smee
Globe Staff

I'm guessing that the James and Audrey Foster Prize, the Institute of Contemporary Art's local version of Britain's notorious Turner Prize, sees itself as a little more grown-up and subtle and a little less sensation-craving than the British award, whose winners over the years have included a guy who switched lights on and off in an empty room (Martin Creed), another who specializes in dead animals suspended in formaldehyde (Damien Hirst), and a third who combined paint with elephant dung (Chris Ofili).

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The image question

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 11, 2008 08:36 PM
 
Lange photo
A 1936 photograph by Dorothea Lange
from Karl Baden's exhibit, ''Covering Photography'',
at the Boston Public Library.

With his collection of 2,000 books, Karl Baden upends the adage, "Don't judge a book by its cover." Baden, a photographer and professor at Boston College, collects books for the iconic images the covers evoke. He wonders: Was the book designer aware that a similar image already existed? Did the designer subconsciously absorb it? Or is there no connection whatsoever?

Baden mulls these issues in the exhibit he curated at the Boston Public Library, "Covering Photography: Imitation, Influence ... and Coincidence."

The cover of John McEnroe's autobiography, "You Cannot Be Serious," looks like a re-staging of Dennis Stock's portrait of James Dean. Baden wonders: Is that what the former tennis star and enfant terrible intended? Is the little girl's dress on the cover of "The Memory Keeper's Daughter" inspired by a similarly haunting photograph in Adam Fuss's "My Ghost" series?

Baden and two other collectors - who specialize in Italian architecture and the atomic age - will speak at the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair at 3 p.m. Saturday at the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center. Details at the book fair's website.

-- JAN GARDNER

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Photography on Film

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 11, 2008 07:52 PM

The medium of film pays tribute to the medium of photography in an 11-film series at the Museum of Fine Arts called "Photography on Film". It's a complement to the exhibits "Karsh 100: A Biography in Images" and "Photographic Figures." Steven Cantor's documentary "What Remains" screens Nov. 13 to 28. Other highlights include three films about Edward Weston airing Nov. 29 to Dec. 20, and Harry Rasky's documentary on Karsh Dec. 14 and 18.

Exhibit runs from Nov. 13 through Dec. 20
$10, $8 for students and seniors
Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston 617-369-3306
More information at the MFA website

-- THE BOSTON GLOBE

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"First Doubt" exhibit: When seeing is confusing

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 3, 2008 03:15 PM
 
England
"England" by Lee Friedlander
Yale University Art Gallery

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

NEW HAVEN - Seeing is believing? Seeing is confusing, or it can be. The whole point of "First Doubt: Optical Confusion in Modern Photography," which runs at the Yale University Art Gallery through Jan. 4, is to demonstrate this basic fact of our visual existence. It does so with nuance, variety, and skill. "First Doubt" is the rare high-concept show that manages to be smart without preening over its smartness.

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Making color respectable: A William Eggleston exhibit

Posted by Teresa Hanafin November 3, 2008 01:52 PM
 
Tricycle, Memphis

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

William Eggleston: Democratic Camera / Photographs and Video, 1961-2008: The Whitney Museum of American Art in New York has organized this first career retrospective of the photographer's work.

It's hard to overstate the impact Eggleston has had on American photography.

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Globe photo exhibit review:
Ellis Island Portraits, 1905-1920

Posted by Teresa Hanafin October 25, 2008 08:30 AM
 
Ruthenian woman
Ruthenian woman from the former kingdom of Ruthenia
(Courtesy of the National Heritage Museum. More photos at bottom.)

Augustus F. Sherman was a clerk with the Immigration Division at Ellis Island, the main portal into the United States for millions of immigrants. He also was an accomplished amateur photographer, and as such, snapped 250 portraits of individuals and families while they were detained -- for medical reasons or further interrogation.

Seventy-five of those photographs are on display at the National Heritage Museum in Lexington through April 26. The Globe's Mark Feeney reviewed the exhibit:

By Mark Feeney
Globe Staff

LEXINGTON - The early 20th century had a mania for classification. The more complex modern life became, it seems, the more those in charge - thinkers no less than officials - sought to divide up that complexity into manageable categories.

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Picturing a better place

Posted by Teresa Hanafin September 11, 2008 08:35 AM

lighthouse_color.jpg
Oceanfront scenes are among the multitudes of images that Westborough resident Ian Tink has taken over the decades; an exhibition of his favorite photographs, "iLife's Good Times!" is on display at the Tatnuck Bookseller shop in his hometown.

Over and over, we hear stories about photographers who have been taking pictures since their parents bought them their first camera when they were 9, or 12, or 14. For many amateurs, photography has been a lifelong pursuit, a hobby-turned-passion that has served as an outlet for their creativity. Sometimes, it has turned into a career; for others, it is a path to help others.

Count Ian Tink of Westborough among the latter. He's only 58, but he's been taking photos for 50 years -- and has built up a portfolio of 500,000 pictures. Now he's putting those photos to good use: Exhibiting them to raise money for a charitable organization he's starting that will bring the work of other artists and performers into nursing homes, prisons, hospitals, mental health wards, housing projects, and urban schools.

Globe correspondent Denise Taylor profiled Ian in the Globe West section; here's her story:

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