FROM

Not-so-mellow yellow


IMG_0409.JPG

“Caution Metal Edges Yellow” metal bins.

Staggering around the Brimfield Antique and Collectibles Show in the mid-day sun last week, I was sure the flashes of color that swam before my eyes meant the beginnings of heat stroke. Upon closer inspection, and after a friendly chat with the dealer, I discovered that, a) I was still conscious and, b) the color I spotted was a searing shade called “sulfur yellow,” which gets its name from the chemical element most recognizable in its yellow crystal form. Now, I am seeing it everywhere — and I am hooked. And I realized that it is a tone I often turn to first when deciding on a color for the logo on Design New England‘s covers — 100 percent yellow with just a touch of cyan. Though it rarely makes it to press, its electric quality sparks my creative juices. (I also have a tendency to express my devotion to a color by painting my toenails in the favorite hue of the moment, though I have yet to bare any sulfur-shaded piggies this summer!)

Advertisement


I gathered some images from our Brimfield visit and from my wanderings around the web that I hope will ignite your color curiosity and perhaps prompt you to share your sulfur yellow finds — from home accents to fashion statements to mani-pedi leaps of faith. Send a picture to us at designnewengland@gmail.com and we’ll post it on our Facebook page at the end of this week!

IMG_0380.jpg

“Sulfur Yellow” metal cabinet from Everything Vintage Co. of Toano, Virginia.


IMG_0382.JPG

The sulfur yellow initial stands out in a display of assorted metal letters from Everything Vintage.


IMG_0399.JPG

“Nuclear Lemon Yellow” plate set, from the West Palm Beach, Florida, dealers at Brimfield.


IMG_0408.JPG

A set of wooden chairs painted “Sunny-Side Up Yellow.”


Terrace and landscape_003.jpg

Eric Roth

“Sun-spots Yellow” terrace seating from the 2011 Museums of Old York Show House in the current issue of Design New England (Double Duty).

IMG_0953.jpg

Jonathan Adler created a sink in Piccadilly Yellow for Kohler.


AchilleaMoonshine.jpg

A quick and easy way to add an acidic yellow to your life — cut flowers.

Love Letters
Close to You
July 20, 2016 | 6:05 AM