Wine Lovers Should Probably Leave Mass.

The LaBelle vineyard has six different grape varieties planted on about two acres of land. The varieties were selected in part because of their ability to ripen early in the fall and to survive cold winters. About 2,000 grape vines, planted in the summer of 2012, will produce a crop this year that can be used to make wine. (Ellen Harasimowicz for The Boston Globe)
The LaBelle vineyard has six different grape varieties planted on about two acres of land. The varieties were selected in part because of their ability to ripen early in the fall and to survive cold winters. About 2,000 grape vines, planted in the summer of 2012, will produce a crop this year that can be used to make wine.
ELLEN HARASIMOWICZ/ THE BOSTON GLOBE

Based on the American Wine Consumer Coalition’s 2013 report card, its prices, availability and few regulations, New Hampshire may be the best state in which to drink your vino. Massachusetts on the other hand, is not the place to be.

According to The Washington Post:

“New Hampshire is one of six states, plus the District, that scored an A+ on the American Wine Consumer Coalition’s 2013 report card for its liberal regulations. Consumers in those states can have wine shipped to their homes through the mail, bring their favorite bottles to restaurants, and buy wine in specialty shops or grocery stores.”

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The 2012 Wine Consumer State-By-State Report Card , which was included in the 2013 report card, for New Hampshire said:

“No state treats wine consumers better than New Hampshire given its laws that provide outstanding access to wine and its laws that provide wine lovers with great convenience.

New Hampshire was ranked the number one state in the report and also mentioned that “ New Hampshire does not arbitrarily ban the sale of wine on Sunday.”

Though New Hampshire is rocking it, let’s take a look at what Massachusetts is bringing to the table (because, it isn’t much):

“Massachusetts wine consumers are burdened by onerous laws that deprive the state’s wine lovers of choice and convenience when it comes to buying wine.”

Massachusetts received an F rating and is ranked 43rd among the states.

The Washington Post explained why New Hampshire is able to rise above:

“What sets New Hampshire apart from the other top-performing states, however, is its tax regime. It’s the only one of those top-performing states that doesn’t levy a tax on wine. California levies an excise tax on wine at a relatively puny 20 cents per gallon, while D.C. piles $1.61 per gallon onto the list price.”

According to the report there were seven states tied for first place with A+ grades: California, District of Columbia, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Oregon and Virginia.

The bottom of the list were 12 states that received an F: Colorado, Tennessee, Indiana, South Dakota, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Delaware, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma and Utah.

So, folks may want to consider heading across the border for your wine.