'); //--> Back to Boston.com homepage Arts | Entertainment Boston Globe Online Cars.com BostonWorks Real Estate Boston.com Sports digitalMass Travel
Home
Help

Top Ten
1. Charles River Labs
2. TJX
3. Perini
4. Investors Fin. Svcs.
5. Gillette
6. Staples
7. OneSource
8. Reebok
9. Bright Horizons
10. State Street
2002 Globe 100

Year's Best
Company of year
Highest market value
Highest sales
Comeback of the year
Biggest stock gain
Fastest growth

Features
Overall performance
Bulls and Bears
  Bulls
  1. Clean Harbors
  2. Hologic
  3. NMT Medical
  4. DeWolfe
  5. Indevus Pharm.
  Bears
  1. Sonus Networks
  2. Art Tech. Group
  3. Praecis Pharm.
  4. American Tower
  5. Dusa Pharmaceutical
Banking
Market value
Sales
Biotech
Medical devices
Growth
  1. Cytyc
  2. Polymedica Corp.
  3. Perini
  4. Tweeter
  5. Boston Private Fin.
Telecom
Employment
Technology
IPOs
Company profiles
Globe 100 notes

Get the chart
The 2002 Globe 100
All the charts


Sections Boston Globe Online: Page One Nation | World Metro | Region Business Sports Living | Arts Editorials


Search the Globe:

Today
Yesterday

The Boston Globe OnlineBoston.com The Best in Massachusetts Business
TOP TEN
6.  S T A P L E S

Ron Sargent
Ron Sargent, who became chief executive of Staples Inc. in February, at the company's Westborough store. Staples this year unveiled a "Back to Brighton" strategy.  (Globe Staff Photo / Jim Davis)

Back to basics -- and profits

    Top 10 Companies

1. Charles River Labs
2. TJX
3. Perini
4. Investors Fin. Svcs.
5. Gillette
6. Staples
7. OneSource
8. Reebok
9. Bright Horizons
10. State Street

Get the chart
   The 2002 Globe 100
   All the charts

For the office-supply retailer, 2001 was an eventful year.

While he remains an active chairman, cofounder Tom Stemberg announced plans to turn over the chief executive's responsibilities to Ron Sargent. Sargent became CEO in February.

Framingham-based Staples also backed away from a controversial plan to pay a premium to board members in a buyback of their tracking shares in Staples. com, an Internet initiative that Staples once thought could be a separate business.

And at the fiscal year's end, Staples unveiled its "Back to Brighton" strategy, a back-to-basics approach that takes its name from the first store Stemberg opened, in 1986.

The strategic realignment aims to streamline the company, focus on the small businesses that are Staples's core customers, and put less emphasis on low-margin products that appeal to mainstream consumers.

To better serve small businesses, Staples is rolling out a new format it calls its Dover store. Smaller than previous stores, it is designed to cut costs and improve profitability.

Last year, Staples's sales rose slightly, to $10.74 billion. Net income jumped to about $265 million from about $60 million in the previous year, when the company took a one-time $206 million charge.

In Staples's annual report, Stemberg and Sargent noted that the company "made progress" in efforts to control costs and establish a platform for profitable growth.

"Staples stands well positioned to continue building on the success of the last 15 years," they wrote.

CHRIS REIDY


© Copyright 2002 Boston Globe Electronic Publishing Inc.
| Advertise | Contact us | Privacy policy |





Sponsors of the Globe 100 breakfast