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The Boston Globe OnlineBoston.com
Still Divided Northern Ireland's Uneasy Peace
 PART ONE 
Five years after 'Good Friday,' unity remains elusive
(By Charles M. Sennott, Globe Staff)
It was an article of faith that the Good Friday agreement would tear down the walls dividing Catholic and Protestant Northern Ireland. But five years after the historic accord, the walls -- both literal and figurative -- have grown higher in many places.

 PART TWO 
British government accused in lawyer's slaying
(By Charles M. Sennott, Globe Staff)
In the history of ''The Troubles,'' as 30 years of political killing are referred to, the murder of Patrick Finucane, a Catholic civil-rights attorney, is one of the most troubling. Many feel the case must be dealt with before Catholics and Protestants can move forward.

 PART THREE 
To move on, a call for 'total truth'
(By Charles M. Sennott, Globe Staff)
A small but diverse group of Protestants and Catholics, police, priests, community activists, and academics has begun to weigh the possibility of establishing a truth and reconciliation commission, which could be a starting point for lasting peace.

 ADDITIONAL COVERAGE 
Next few months seen as decisive in peace process
A look at the major Catholic and Protestant groups
Graphic: Religious affiliation in the police force

 ONLINE EXTRA 
Questions for Gerry Adams and David Trimble
The Globe sat down with Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams and Ulster Unionist Party leader David Trimble to discuss the progress made in Northern Ireland since the Good Friday accord. Here are extended excerpts from the interviews.

Q&A
Globe's Sennott answers readers' questions
Boston.com readers were invited to pose questions about this series and the Northern Ireland peace process to Globe reporter Charles M. Sennott. Here are his responses.

 PHOTO GALLERIES



Theresa McNeill with her sons on the Catholic side of the peace wall.
Pictures from Belfast


Patrick Finucane's widow Geraldine with her son, John.
The Patrick Finucane case


Visitors to the peace wall along Cupar Way in Belfast.
Looking to the future

(Globe Staff Photos / Barry Chin)


 FROM THE GLOBE ARCHIVES

4/11/1998
Belfast accord hailed as a 'new beginning'
(By Kevin Cullen, Globe Staff)
In a triumph of diplomacy and stamina, Catholic nationalists and Protestant unionists in Northern Ireland reached a historic settlement yesterday that may resolve one of the world's most intractable conflicts.

4/19/1998
The long, bloody path to Irish peace
(By Kevin Cullen, Globe Staff)
In March of 1988, everyone had blood on their hands. In the course of 13 days, the venality and futility of the violence in Northern Ireland had come full circle.

5/24/1998
A resounding vote for Irish peace
(By Kevin Cullen and Elizabeth Neuffer, Globe Staff)
Speaking with one voice for the first time in 80 years, the people of Ireland, north and south, overwhelmingly supported a political settlement that could pave the way for a peaceful sharing of the island and end one of the world's most intractable conflicts.

5/25/1998
In an Ulster town, hate still thrives
(By Kevin Cullen, Globe Staff)
While the political settlement approved overwhelmingly by voters north and south suggested the vast majority of people on the island of Ireland want to accommodate each other, a walk around Portadown is a somber reminder of how much more has to be done before the settlement produces peace.

 ON THE WEB

IRA statement on the peace process
Released April 13, 2003
Read the statement

Text of Good Friday agreement
cain.ulst.ac.uk/events/peace/docs/agreement.htm

Northern Ireland census
Recent census information is available from the Northern Ireland Statistics & Research Agency at
www.nisra.gov.uk

Police Service of Northern Ireland
www.psni.police.uk

Northern Ireland Executive
www.nics.gov.uk

Bloody Sunday Enquiry
www.bloody-sunday-inquiry.org.uk

Stevens Enquiry
Report on the latest Patrick Finucane investigation, released April 17, 2003.
met.police.uk/commissioner/MP-Stevens-
Enquiry-3.pdf

(PDF file requires Adobe Acrobat)

British-Irish Rights Watch
Report on the Finucane case from an independent human rights group.
www.birw.org/justice.html

Pat Finucane Centre
Links to reports and news articles on the Finucane case.
www.serve.com/pfc