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 Latest coverage

March 23
Law's words frame new play

March 2
Wary Catholics return to church

January 25, 2004
Churches report attendance up

January 4, 2004
Dot parish struggles to survive

December 28
Hudson fill-in priest welcomed

December 12
Law prays daily for diocese

November 22
Assignment for Law expected

November 20
Policies on VOTF reconsidered

September 19
Crisis issues in church's future

September 18
Meeting ban at parish is lifted

August 4
O'Malley given warm welcome

August 1
Lawmakers see shades of gray

July 31
An angry protest, and prayers
Voices of protest and support
Three in crowd bound in hope
At BC, optimistic students watch

July 29
Lay group to engage O'Malley

July 24
Many outraged after AG's report

July 21
Law to skip bishop installation

July 18
O'Malley invites Law, victims

July 11
Bishops seek private opinions

Earlier stories

Spotlight Report

MESSAGE BOARD

Your thoughts on the priest sexual abuse scandal

The priest sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church has been unfolding for 3 months now, not just locally, but also nationally and overseas. We'd like to hear your thoughts on what steps the church should take to address the problem. What can rank-and-file Catholics do? How can church officials regain the trust of the faithful?

Response pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  

Page 16


At the very least....Bernard Law should resign, the church leaders must include lay people in decision making around priest appointments, celibacy and women's role in the church....until the church becomes more democratic there is no real chance for change. The Vatican must recognize and support the wishes of a truly democratic church. All easy to say, but not easy to do. However, for change to happen the lay people must take charge of their church.

Mary Kenney, Petersham, MA


I am truly ashamed to be a catholic in this day and age. When I grew up,we were taught that priests and nuns took a vow of celibacy and that they were servants of God. Now all of this sexual abuse has come out. I think, first Cardinal Law should resign from his position. He moved priests around from parish to parish years ago everytime a case of sexual abuse came up. I also think it's time that the churches let the priests get married and have families. It's time for the church to change with the times or the Catholic Church will have far more serious problems that it does now

Anthony, Wilmington


It is time to take the Church for the People!! Clerics have to much power and have proven beyond any doubt whatsoever they can't handle it.

Jim Birch, Centerville


Listen to the people, change has always come from the faithful in the history of the church. The Cardinals should resign and do some type of public penance. This is America and no one is above the law. Scriture says, "Woe to you who give scandal it would be better that a milestone be hung around your neck and you be thrown into the sea." And "by your fruits you will know them."

Bernadette, Albany,NY


Listen to the people, change has always come from the faithful in the history of the church. The Cardinals should resign and do some type of public penance. This is America and no one is above the law. Scriture says, "Woe to you who give scandal it would be better that a milestone be hung around your neck and you be thrown into the sea." And "by your fruits you will know them."

Bernadette, Albany,NY


Cardinal Law should resign and face prosecution charges.... "aiding and abetting?"... "if you give shelter to a terrorist?" The Church has filled our lives with hypocrisy and taken away our trust in them. To blatently ignore those cries for help by families who were abused by these priests and then shake it off by saying "mistakes were made" is in itself an abuse of our intelligence and our trust. Maybe withholding money in the Bishops funds or other special collections will make them sit up and take notice. It's always been about money.

Beth, Worcester


As a Roman Catholic, I strongly feel it is time to ordain married men and women as Roman Catholic Priests.

Frank Nigro, Arlington, Virginia 22204


Cardinal Law and our NH bishop, John McCormack, have failed not just as priests, but as men. They should resign immediately, don ashes and sack cloth, and do public penance.

John Grimes, Rochester, NH


I was raised in the Catholic church but choose not to worship there as an adult. That was a decision that I made back in 1985 when I was given an ultimatum by the pastor of the church where I was married. Weather Law stays or resigns has no bearing on my life. I do however, have serious reservations about the media's lopsided and opinionated reporting of the situation. While it does look very bad for Law, he has supporters that should also be heard in order to provide some balance to the story.

Richard, Westford


Until the clergy culture of secrecy, privilege, exception, and elitism is changed, little will be done to root out the core problems of sexual abuse and other indiscretions. The climate of protecting one another within the priesthood (much like the 11th commandment of politicians to speak no evil of a fellow democrat or republican) from all rock throwing from outsiders (whether deserved or not) has a 2000 year history and a bureacracy to challenge the likes of any other human institution. This will be a tough nut to crack. To make substantial changes, the changes must come from the top: the Holy Father, the Cardinals, the Archbishops, and the Bishops--in effect, those who are most intrenched in the system itself. Bishops who are in charge of their own dioceses have little if any accountability to lay Catholic parishionerss within their territory and as little accountability to Rome. They are in effect "little princes" subject to little control and corporation soles with every asset of the diocese in their names. Perhaps a first step would be a change in how Bishops are appointed/elected. The priests and lay parishioners should have a significant input as to who is appointed to a Bishop's see. And this person should be accountable to this group as well as to Rome. Bishops are called to serve, not to be served.

Scott Nault, Venice


Response pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  


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