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 Latest coverage

March 23
Law's words frame new play

March 2
Wary Catholics return to church

January 25, 2004
Churches report attendance up

January 4, 2004
Dot parish struggles to survive

December 28
Hudson fill-in priest welcomed

December 12
Law prays daily for diocese

November 22
Assignment for Law expected

November 20
Policies on VOTF reconsidered

September 19
Crisis issues in church's future

September 18
Meeting ban at parish is lifted

August 4
O'Malley given warm welcome

August 1
Lawmakers see shades of gray

July 31
An angry protest, and prayers
Voices of protest and support
Three in crowd bound in hope
At BC, optimistic students watch

July 29
Lay group to engage O'Malley

July 24
Many outraged after AG's report

July 21
Law to skip bishop installation

July 18
O'Malley invites Law, victims

July 11
Bishops seek private opinions

Earlier stories

Spotlight Report

MESSAGE BOARD

Your thoughts on the priest sexual abuse scandal

The priest sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church has been unfolding for 3 months now, not just locally, but also nationally and overseas. We'd like to hear your thoughts on what steps the church should take to address the problem. What can rank-and-file Catholics do? How can church officials regain the trust of the faithful?

Response pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  

Page 22


The first thing that needs to be done is for Cardinal Law to resign today. What is he trying to prove? Second, the Catholic church needs to get with the times. Thirdly, the church need to allow priests to get married. It's not natural to hold back sex from human beings. This may mean pulling away from the Vatican. As far as how church officials can regain my trust again....I'm not sure they can. I'm thinking about leaving the church altogether. This has not been an easy decision for me considering it's the only religion I know and that I grew up going to church every Sunday. My husband grew up Lutheran and I may look into the Protestant church.

Kathy, Plymouth


All Catholics should reform their lives and resolve to do whatever it takes to lead lives of radical holiness and total sacrifice. This is what the Church and the priesthood need. There are three pillars of the Faith which need to be followed: orthodoxy of doctrine, devotion to the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, and devotion to the Holy Virgin Mary. Adherence to these will bring true reform to our lives and to the Church. Having said that, I believe that Cardinal Law should resign because of his inexcusable harboring of evil and subversion of the truth. Let the Pope appoint a new bishop who will lead the people to holiness and truth.

Mark Jacobson, Holliston


Although I now live in Vermont, I lived in Boston for over twenty years. During that time I attended mass at St. Paul's in Cambridge, Holy Cross in the South End and Gate of Heaven in South Boston. I've always considered Bernard Law to be a very arrogant man, and I think it is that arrogance that has caused so much pain for so many innocent people. My question is: Why is he not in jail? I thought abetting criminals was a crime in itself!

Maggie Freeman, Dorset, VT


It is about time the Church started to change with the times. Religion and history are critical to the continuation of society but that does not mean that the Church must stay in the historical past. It is clear that the priests are having a tough time living in a new society by old rules.

Charlie, Billerica


The first step is for Cardinal Law to resign.

R Campo, Cambridge


Non Practicing Catholic. I don't know of any family tree that doesn't have sexual abuse in some form or another. The church is also a family who doesn't want to admit that it exists. I think when they are found out they should be removed from contact, treated and confined to a remote post forever or sent to jail if they refuse. It is not the cloth that has failed but the man in the cloth.

Kevin Walsh, Somerville


It is now time for the good cardinal to go into that good night. he should consider himself fortunate that he has not yet been indicted by a grand jury. he has enabled pedophiles, paid hush money and lied about it. cardinal law it is time to do the right thing, resign and admit your failures..

bob prindeville, west roxbury


I don't think that we are the right people to judge. If a few priests made big mistakes, there are a lot that are models. It is anybody paying attention to this big group of nice people or is everybody alarmed for the wrong behaviour of some??

Lilian Flores, Everett, MA


I CONTRIBUTE TO THE CHARITIES DIRECTLY INSTEAD OF THROUGH THE COLLECTION PLATE. I DO NOT WANT MY MONEY USED TO PAY OFF LAWSUITS FOR THESE MONSTERS. THE CHURCH WILL NOT SEE ANOTHER DIME FROM ME UNTIL THE HYPOCRITE BERNARD LAW RESIGNS.

MICHAEL DINEEN, WOBURN


The whole idea of this is shameful. My biggest problem is that this is nothing less than a coverup of a crime. Common sense tells us that the crimre of molesting young boys was committed, the people in higher positiions knew about this and covered it up from both the general public and law enforcement. Is this not a conspiracy? Cardnial Law must go, with his head bowed in disgrace. People need to be charged with these crimes not only the perpitraitor but the people who covered it up. The catholic church should be ashamed of it's self.

Rich, Marshfield


Response pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  


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