Back to Boston.com homepage Arts | Entertainment Boston Globe Online Cars.com BostonWorks Real Estate Boston.com Sports digitalMass Travel The Boston Globe Spotlight Investigation Boston.com Abuse in the Catholic Church
HomePredator priestsScandal and coverupThe victimsThe financial costOpinion
Cardinal Law and the laityThe church's responseThe clergyInvestigations and lawsuits
Interactive2002 scandal overviewParish mapExtrasArchivesDocumentsAbout this site
 Latest coverage

March 23
Law's words frame new play

March 2
Wary Catholics return to church

January 25, 2004
Churches report attendance up

January 4, 2004
Dot parish struggles to survive

December 28
Hudson fill-in priest welcomed

December 12
Law prays daily for diocese

November 22
Assignment for Law expected

November 20
Policies on VOTF reconsidered

September 19
Crisis issues in church's future

September 18
Meeting ban at parish is lifted

August 4
O'Malley given warm welcome

August 1
Lawmakers see shades of gray

July 31
An angry protest, and prayers
Voices of protest and support
Three in crowd bound in hope
At BC, optimistic students watch

July 29
Lay group to engage O'Malley

July 24
Many outraged after AG's report

July 21
Law to skip bishop installation

July 18
O'Malley invites Law, victims

July 11
Bishops seek private opinions

Earlier stories

Spotlight Report

MESSAGE BOARD

Your thoughts on the priest sexual abuse scandal

The priest sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church has been unfolding for 3 months now, not just locally, but also nationally and overseas. We'd like to hear your thoughts on what steps the church should take to address the problem. What can rank-and-file Catholics do? How can church officials regain the trust of the faithful?

Response pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  

Page 27


At the least, The Church must let clerics to marry, and sllow women to be ordained. For too long, the Church has held fast to celibacy, and male-only admission. Until this problem is solved, the problems in the Church will continue.

Steve, Brighton


the catholic church, as well as all religous organizations, should have their tax exempt status revoked. every one should pay the same taxes for property they own and income they generate. the billions of untracked and untaxed dollars that flow through the church, which is finally starting to be seen as the profoundly corrupt organization it is, allow the church so much political power that for 400 yrs, they have been able to cover up or pay off thousands of sex abuse cases. this needs to be stopped, and can only be accomplished by addressing the root corruption whicch the church was founded on.

richard vernon, douglas, ma


Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Priests need to realize they are servants of the church. The people need to realize they are the church. The abuse took place amid a climate of secrecy in which priests were trusted because they were priests. The church needs to create a more open climate, one in which ALL issues regarding the parish, the schools, the youth ministries, are open for discussion. In that climate, pedophiles will run the other way. Pedophilia is not about sex; it is about power. While there may be homosexual priests who entered into homosexual relationships with young adults, the real horror was perpetrated on young children. These predators enjoyed the power they wielded over young children. There are lots of them in the priesthood but there are "control freaks" everywhere. "Control freaks" should never be alone with children.

Lucy, Marlboro


I am Catholic and firmly believe that the Catholic priests should be allowed to get married and have families. How can they properly advise people on marital problems and family issues when they have no idea what it is like? In the Orthodox religion which is very similar to the Catholic religion, the priests are allowed to be be married once. You never hear of any problems of sexual abuse in those religions.

Monique, Swansea, Ma


I feel that the cardinal should resign, I am a Catholic and am deeply offended by the actions that the cardinal has taken. The church should do what it has to do to make things right.

Chris, Medway, MA


IT IS AMAZING TO HEAR PEOPLE SAY THAT CARDINAL LAW SHOULD NOT RESIGN.SHOULD SOMEBODY WHO HAS DONE GOOD THINGS FOR THE COMMUNITY BE FORGIVEN FOR KNOWINGLY CONCEALING THE WORST CRIME ON THIS EARTH THAT IS THE RAPE OF INNOCENT MINDS AND YOUNG SOULS.I DONT THINK SO. I PERSONALLY BELIEVE HE SHOULD BE PROSECUTED FOR AND THROWN IN JAIL.HE IS AS GUILTY AS THE OFFENDER I BELIEVE THE TERM USED IS AN ACCESSORY TO A CRIME.MR LAW SHOULD RESIGN.HE COULD HAVE GOTTEN OF WITH MAKING A MISTAKE IN THE CASE OF JOHN GEOGHAN BUT AFTER EVIDENCE SHOWING HE CONCEALED ANOTHER PRIEST THERE IS NO EXCUSE I WONDER HOW MANY MORE MISTAKES HAVE BEEN DONE.I THINK THE WHOLE SCARY PART IS THAT THE APOLOGIES COMING FOWARD FROM THE VARIOUS CARDINALS IS THAT THESE PRACTICES WOULD HAVE CONTINUED IF THE NEWSPAPERS HAD NOT BLOWN THIS STORY.THANKS GOES TO THE GLOBE AND HERALD KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK

PETER, BOSTON


I was raised a Catholic, spent 12 years in a parochial school, so this situation is shocking to me. I think the only way to re-establish credibility in the Church is for Law to step down, and then for the Church to be very aggressive in seeking out other priests who may not have yet been discovered and asking them to resign and/or step out of the priesthood. They need to set up some sort of internal police control. They should come forward and be totally open about any other as yet undiscovered offenders. This way people may find a way to once again feel they can trust the local priests. It's hypocritical to preach love towards your fellow man and kindness and personal responsibility, when they have in fact been harboring criminals, or at the very least allowing them to continue their crimes against children. It's unspeakable, and they have to make amends, and immediately, and not just with money. They have to show an aggressive and sincere effort to stop this nonsenes by instituting very strict controls with respect to dealing with children. There should never be a situation where a priest is alone with any child.

Mickey Nobile, Lynn, MA


To even begin to regain any sense of trust with the general population, never mind practicing catholics, the leadership in general, Cardinal Law in specific must terminate their positions. The church as it is looked at and reguarded today will begin to crumble if in fact some tangable leadership changes are not made in the very near future, starting but not ending with Law. Things have gotten out of hand!

Walter, Edgartown


the church should close it doors forever. this is an institution as corrupt as any government. for all of you religious people out there, remember that your donations to this institution are funding the cover-ups and therefore contributing to the problem. If you find comfort in the absurdity of religion, you'd be best to practice it on your own.

jake, osterville


First off, Cardinal Law must go. He has become the Richard Nixon of the Catholic church. There is a universal problem that the Church MUST deal with as a whole, not just Boston. Something has gone VERY wrong. Our civic and criminal laws were all based religious law. Somehow it appears that the Church's law ha become self-serving; to be used only when convenient. The Church must adopt a policy to completely comply with the morals, ethics and laws which govern the public, with some confidentiality permitted, and MUST agree that it cannot selectively take the law into it's own hands. Separation of Church and State is a must, but protecting its own in such cases is completely reprehensible. The Church has effectively decided to compromise the laws of the Lord as it tried in the Middle Ages!

Jon Marcus, Andover, MA


Response pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  


© Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
Advertise | Contact us | Privacy policy