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 Latest coverage

March 23
Law's words frame new play

March 2
Wary Catholics return to church

January 25, 2004
Churches report attendance up

January 4, 2004
Dot parish struggles to survive

December 28
Hudson fill-in priest welcomed

December 12
Law prays daily for diocese

November 22
Assignment for Law expected

November 20
Policies on VOTF reconsidered

September 19
Crisis issues in church's future

September 18
Meeting ban at parish is lifted

August 4
O'Malley given warm welcome

August 1
Lawmakers see shades of gray

July 31
An angry protest, and prayers
Voices of protest and support
Three in crowd bound in hope
At BC, optimistic students watch

July 29
Lay group to engage O'Malley

July 24
Many outraged after AG's report

July 21
Law to skip bishop installation

July 18
O'Malley invites Law, victims

July 11
Bishops seek private opinions

Earlier stories

Spotlight Report

MESSAGE BOARD

Your thoughts on the priest sexual abuse scandal

The priest sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church has been unfolding for 3 months now, not just locally, but also nationally and overseas. We'd like to hear your thoughts on what steps the church should take to address the problem. What can rank-and-file Catholics do? How can church officials regain the trust of the faithful?

Response pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  

Page 8


It amazes me that everyone is calling for changes in the Catholic church. It seems to me that once again people want to make changes only when it benefits themselves. What they do like they say is "Gods Law" and can not be changed. Hypocrites!

Rich Sarson, Atlanta, GA


That the Church has not done enough to police itself is evident. There is a profound sense of loss among the faithful that the Church has placed its priests above its followers. As in any other profession, there are good and bad. The Church needs to do a better job keeping the bad from its parishes and removing them thereafter as it becomes clear that a problem exists. However, the Church is not a democracy and people need to understand that this is an institutional problem which will require an institutional solution. Demanding resignations and reform do not achieve its intended results. Prayerful consideration of this problem, by both the laity and the clergy, is in order and can make a difference. Where crimes were committed, those responsible should be held accountable to the full extent of the law. But this is not a Catholic problem, it's a societal problem. Victims need our help and compassion. Predators need justice. But the Church is not the predator, it is a victim. Keep that in mind while the hysteria reigns!

Peter Buchbauer, Winchester, VA


I believe that the Church has begun to address the issue of sexual abuse within the Church. The process of entering a Seminary is much more involved, full disclosure has become the norm, and the Archdiocese has taken a zero-tolerance policy. We must remember that most changes are done reactively to issues that have arisen. This occurs in government, schools, and churches. Does this change the abuse that happened? No. However, before the Church is set out on its cross, I think people need to take a step back for a moment. One should always look at history in the context and time that it is taken from. It is easy to look back 20-30 years and become 'experts' on how sexual abuse cases should have been handled. We don't have the luxory of going back in time. Did the Cardinal and Bishops have malicious intent? I truly believe in my heart that they did not. Unfortunately, some in the Catholic faith have seized upon this dark hour to rally for their own causes-married clergy, ordination of women, a more democratic Church. This in some ways is a further abuse of the victims of priest abuse. We need to stay focussed on the victims of these abuses and make sure that the policies established by this diocese and dioceses across the country are upheld and work.

David, Boston


I am not a Christian, but am so distraught over this tragedy. How could any person, let alone the highest ranking Catholic in this area, even think he should not be accountable. Healing will never begin until Cardinal Law is replaced. My heart goes out to all those individuals that have suffered; not only the ones attacked, but their parents, siblings, and anyone involved with these people since the time of the episodes. Cardinal Law should have and could have prevented these attackers from repeating their attrocities by removing them from Churches that had young people. Cardinal Law should be ashamed of himself. Last, anyone that feels badly for the Cardinal obviously didn't have a son or relative harmed.

Sandy, Framingham


The time has come to totally overhaul the clerical caste system that has directly led to this crisis. The priesthood is built on special privileges and as a result priests, bishops etc have become far too invested in preserving those privileges. They will never do the sort of house cleaning that might raise questions about this sort of secret society. A married clergy is a must. The church will have better candidates to choose from and women will have more of a say in church doings which will be a huge positive. The men in the ministry have failed - their indulgences, conducted in secret, have hurt their most vulnerable charges.

Philip McGovern, Placentia, CA


My mother is now 74 years young and was raised Catholic. She remembers as a little girl being told by her parents to be cautious of priests. (She instructed her children with the same message.) Sexual abuse has been going on for decades and everyone knew it existed but no knew to what extent. The only way for the Catholic religion to regain the people's trust and faith is to get rid of the rank-and-file who allowed this mess to occur for so long. Regards, CRT

CRT, Franklin


Not only should Cardinal Law resign, there should be criminal charges filed against him. The charges could be endless, aiding and abetting, accomplice after the fact, failure to report a crime againt a child. All these multiplied a hundred times. The basic tenet of the church is confession, contrition and penance. Cardinal Law has confessed, he CLAIMS to be contrite, and now it is time for his Penance. The Church makes the rules but does not want to play by them. You can only sweep so much under the rug until you trip and fall in the filth that's been hidden underneath

Kathleen Kelley, Quincy


Give the clergy the option to marry; ordain women; let Rome know we will not be a dumb, obedient slave to their authority; and introduce a lot of democracy to the church authority structure. For example: create parish councils and archdiocesan councils of lay people with real power. Make all levels of the church accountable to these councils. Regard lay people as real adults with the ability to think and make wise choices. Stop treating them as children whose only function is to obey and write checks. Wake up!

Robert, Milton


As these controversies started to be bared to the public over the last few weeks, I wondered if the cardinal had a conscience. Now, I wonder if he has a soul. That he could preach to us, his flock, on morality which his own chosen few were flouting, is an indication that the wolves are indeed in charge of the meadow.

John, Arlington


Not only should Cardinal Law resign, there should be criminal charges filed against him. The charges could be endless, aiding and abetting, accomplice after the fact, failure to report a crime againt a child. All these multiplied a hundred times. The basic tenet of the church is confession, contrition and penance. Cardinal Law has confessed, he CLAIMS to be contrite, and now it is time for his Penance. The Church makes the rules but does not want to play by them. You can only sweep so much under the rug until you trip and fall in the filth that's been hidden underneath

Kathleen Kelley, Quincy


Response pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  


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