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 Latest coverage

March 23
Law's words frame new play

March 2
Wary Catholics return to church

January 25, 2004
Churches report attendance up

January 4, 2004
Dot parish struggles to survive

December 28
Hudson fill-in priest welcomed

December 12
Law prays daily for diocese

November 22
Assignment for Law expected

November 20
Policies on VOTF reconsidered

September 19
Crisis issues in church's future

September 18
Meeting ban at parish is lifted

August 4
O'Malley given warm welcome

August 1
Lawmakers see shades of gray

July 31
An angry protest, and prayers
Voices of protest and support
Three in crowd bound in hope
At BC, optimistic students watch

July 29
Lay group to engage O'Malley

July 24
Many outraged after AG's report

July 21
Law to skip bishop installation

July 18
O'Malley invites Law, victims

July 11
Bishops seek private opinions

Earlier stories

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Spotlight Report

MESSAGE BOARD

How has the abuse scandal impacted your parish?

"Parish at the crossroads" tells the story of how one Boston-area chuch has coped with the priest sexual abuse scandal. What effect has the crisis had on your parish? Has it drawn the congregation closer together? Driven them apart? How have your priest and parish leaders responded to the crisis, and are you satisfied with their efforts?

Response pages:  1  2  3  4  

Page 3


How in the world could anyone support a religion that has such a horrible history as the catholic church? If you go back to the murdering of jews during WWII, that should be a good indication as to where this religion was headed. Now you have good old Cardinal Law supporting child rape. Why isn't he being prosecuted along with the priest who did it? Anyone else who knows about a crime and doesn't report it get's prosecuted. Why doesn't he? It seems that our justice system is just as bad as he is.

Dale, Boston


Being from Hingham, several of those pedophiles came stright from St. Pauls. It drove me right out the parish, quite frankly I dont want to be supporting that type!

Andy, Hingham


I have attended Mass weekly all my life, (41 years), and continue to do so. The comments on this page have been rather disappointing in both their shallowness and lack of insight, and fairly blatant anti-Catholicism. I mean, Killing Jews? Ursuline Convent, which was attacked in an atrocious act of violence. these are obvious canards and betray the thoughtlessness and ignorance of the commenters. For the faithless and the shallow, this is evidently another excuse to indulge bigotry and prejudice. For the faithful, I think the story has been one of great anguish, sorrow, hurt and anger. I am as disappointed in Cardinal Law as anyone, and am devastated that a priest I know well has been implicated. (Of course, people seem to overlook the fact that teachers, doctors, social workers, and all manner of others abuse children every day, not to mention the thousands of teenagers and college students taken advantage of by lecherous men and women to no consequence or attention whatsover. Of course, no one says, i'll never let my child alone with a teacher again. Now, to be sure, it is deeply shocking that this has involved men of God, and more shocking still, is the extent of covering up the crimes on the part of chancery officials and the Cardinal himself, but people of faith I think continue to look to Christ, take part in (and comfort from) the Sacraments and recite the Creed. The Church will endure and the People of God will continue to give thanks to Him who gives us all free will and then sent his Son to die for our sins. Cardinal Law can do nothing to make the wrongs right, but he can't make what is right wrong either. The many contemptous commenters will perhaps never know the joy of the Liturgy, but those of us who do, will continue to seek it even if our priests are lazy, corrupt or weak. and even if our Church is subjected to ridule and scorn. My own parish is a wonderful place for the simple reason that there is a Mass there every Sunday that I can go to and witness the Eucharist and hear the Gospels. I bring my children there every Sunday, and hope that they will come to love their faith as I do. The best I can do for them is to expose them to the truth of the liturgy, and the traditions of our heritage.

Dave, Charlestown


I have left my former parish. initially, our pastor tried to downplay the seriousness and the scope with the "just a few bad apples" routine. then he called on us to have trust that the church would take care of things--then he downplayed it some more, "just a few slip-ups", and, the last time i attended there, he ranted about the persecution of the church by the media. he'll never get it and did not even begin to address the real issues--it's like he thought we were all stupid and were simply going to buy whatever he said. maybe some do. it sickened me.

lori nyi, galesburg il


I don't think losing faith because of the scandal means you never had any, I think it just means it was a bit misplaced. Faith in the church and faith in God are two very different things, but the church has been acting for years as if they're one and the same. That's what caused this problem in the first place! I get the impression that Catholic parishes here in the west are horrified by what happened but still honestly believe scandals like this can't happen to them. My parish hasn't made any mention of it and hasn't brought it up in the junior high or high school youth group (though I'm sure the kids must think about it since the victims were their age). Since it is very clear that the good-old-boys structure of the church is not able to cope with the complexities of human nature on its own, it only makes sense to bring up the possibility of opening the priesthood to all adult Catholics. The Catholic church desperately needs to change, and acknowledge the human nature and origin of the limitations placed on priest eligibility. But before people will unequivocally support the hierarchical changes needed to make the church a more holy place, they must learn to tease out customs and traditions placed in the church by society (such as not allowing women or married men to become priests) from the true aim of the church. Parish priests know this- and it is their effort and the effort of their parishioners that is needed right now!

N, Fort Collins CO


My church is fine and coping very well. I don't see the difficulty in my churches or my family/friends' churches as they are portrayed in the media. It's not a realistic portrayal of the typical churchoger and is shall I say - disingenuous. But, the media is the media and tries to create more stories for their agenda than they cover these days...

Churchgoer, Boston and Hingham, MA


Why has it been ok to be anti-Catholic and bigoted towards the Catholic faith over the years and now more so than ever? The haters have come out in full force now and shiwn their latent bigotry an the Globe unfortunately supports their hatred and narrow-mindedness.

Name Catholic and proud of it, Boston, MA


The illusions about religion have been broken. Religion is just a business. Certain words have been passed along for two thousand years and supposedly we should have faith based on those words? The men entering the occupation of clergy are turning out to be among the scummiest on earth. We should contribute and confess sins to these guys? No way, it is over.

fred valenti, southbridge


I am catholic and will continue to be, but as I watched the priest trail on court t.v. last January it took awhile for it to sink in but boy this past year has been a eyeopener. My daughter was a student at william and mary college from 1982 thru 1986 and there was a catholic priest who was the campus minister. We went to his awards ceremony the weekend of her graduation since he was leaving as campus minister after ten years. He died about a year or so later of aids. How did this happen? If anyone can shed some light on this please help. Our bishop Sullivan had to have another bishop Foley come in and ride herd on Sullivan for a few years. Our diocese Richmond has been mentioned in the book "Goodbye Good Men" by Michael Rose as the second diocese in the U.S. with the lowest number of men wanting to become priests during the seventies and eighties. I wonder why a good reporter can not get on this situation here in Virginia? Submit Submit

Dorothy Finger, Williamsburg, Va.


I don't think losing faith because of the scandal means you never had any, I think it just means it was a bit misplaced. Faith in the church and faith in God are two very different things, but the church has been acting for years as if they're one and the same. That's what caused this problem in the first place! I get the impression that Catholic parishes here in the west are horrified by what happened but still honestly believe scandals like this can't happen to them. My parish hasn't made any mention of it and hasn't brought it up in the junior high or high school youth group (though I'm sure the kids must think about it since the victims were their age). Since it is very clear that the good-old-boys structure of the church is not able to cope with the complexities of human nature on its own, it only makes sense to bring up the possibility of opening the priesthood to all adult Catholics. The Catholic church desperately needs to change, and acknowledge the human nature and origin of the limitations placed on priest eligibility. But before people will unequivocally support the hierarchical changes needed to make the church a more holy place, they must learn to tease out customs and traditions placed in the church by society (such as not allowing women or married men to become priests) from the true aim of the church. Parish priests know this- and it is their effort and the effort of their parishioners that is needed right now!

N, Fort Collins CO


Response pages:  1  2  3  4  


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