Back to Boston.com homepage Arts | Entertainment Boston Globe Online Cars.com BostonWorks Real Estate Boston.com Sports digitalMass Travel The Boston Globe Spotlight Investigation Boston.com Abuse in the Catholic Church
HomePredator priestsScandal and coverupThe victimsThe financial costOpinion
Cardinal Law and the laityThe church's responseThe clergyInvestigations and lawsuits
Interactive2002 scandal overviewParish mapExtrasArchivesDocumentsAbout this site
 Latest coverage

March 11
Victims' lawyer to sue Dupre

March 6
Suit accuses insurer of fraud

March 5
Charges against bishop eyed

March 1
Activists seek sex abuse panel

February 26
Alleged victim to aid probe

February 13
Springfield probe is sought

January 7, 2004
Agents faced reluctant aides

December 3
Church settles with victim

November 15
Settlement fuels money advice

November 12
Claims set aside until 2004

October 30
Hard line set on abuse trials

October 21
Most plaintiffs accept deal

October 19
Therapy sought in abuse suit

October 17
Lawyer says settlement near

October 8
Victims agonize over deal

September 12
Victims seen taking settlement

September 11
Church deal a boon for lawyers

September 10
Church in $85 million accord
Archdiocese facing new strains
Most plaintiffs to accept deal
O'Malley makes an appeal

September 9
Negotiations resume in cases

Earlier stories

Spotlight Report

Newspaper to challenge church subpoena

By Michael S. Rosenwald, Globe Staff, 10/14/2002

A lawyer for The New York Times Co. yesterday said the publisher will quickly move to quash a subpoena issued last week to a Worcester Telegram & Gazette reporter by the Worcester Diocese.

Kathleen A. Shaw, a religion reporter with the newspaper, which is owned by The New York Times Co., is scheduled to be deposed Nov. 11 in connection with sexual abuse allegations against Auxiliary Bishop George Rueger.

James G. Reardon Jr., the lawyer for the Roman Catholic diocese, has also asked Shaw to turn over notes, e-mails, and photographs that she has gathered on the Rueger case, including his alleged victim, Sime Braio, and Braio's attorney Daniel J. Shea.

"It's inappropriate and inconsistent with the First Amendment for the diocese to use the newspaper as a witness and a helper to their case," said George Freeman, assistant general counsel to The New York Times Co., which also owns the Globe.

Reardon, however, said the reporter "is a material witness who has spoken with the alleged victim." He said there is no risk of her betraying her sources' confidences because she has already made their names and stories public in the newspaper.

Shea, who represents the alleged victim in the suit filed against Rueger, 72, last July in Worcester Superior Court, agreed with Freeman and called the subpoena an attempt to violate freedom of the press, which is protected by the First Amendment.

Braio, 52, of Shrewsbury, says he was molested by Rueger as an altar boy at Our Lady of Lourdes in Worcester and the Lyman School for Boys in Westborough. Rueger denies the allegations.

Material from the Associated Press was used in this report.

This story ran on page B2 of the Boston Globe on 10/14/2002.
© Copyright 2002 Globe Newspaper Company.


© Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company
Advertise | Contact us | Privacy policy