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Spotlight Report

Musicians offer concert to honor abuse victims

By Martha Bartle, Globe Correspondent, 9/28/2003

Five local musicians will present a free concert tonight to honor the victims of clergy sexual abuse.

The event ''is an effort by several musicians who want to honor the suffering and healing of abuse victims,'' said David Clohessy, the national director of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, who will give an opening greeting to concertgoers. ''We're hoping it'll be a very moving and healing event.''

Performers include three chair holders with the Boston Symphony Orchestra -- John Ferrillo, principal oboe; violinist Elita Kang; and flutist Elizabeth Ostling -- as well as Carol Rodland, professor of viola at the New England Conservatory, and Hugh Hinton of the Longy School of Music.

Ostling, who Clohessy said has taken a strong interest in helping the organization and the victims of clergy sexual abuse, spearheaded the event.

''We're just very touched and grateful that the musicians have put this together,'' Clohessy said.

The concert, which will showcase the works of Bach, Schumann, and Debussy, among others, will take place at 5 p.m. at the Edward M. Pickman Concert Hall in Cambridge. Admission is free, though offerings will be taken to benefit SNAP and a reception will follow the concert.


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