istock photo

We may all have a super hero-like ability in the near future: night vision.

Zhaohui  Zhong, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Michigan, told the Independent that contact lenses may someday be able to register “the full infrared spectrum” plus visible and ultraviolet light.

"We can make the entire design super-thin," Zhong said of graphene lenses. "It can be stacked on a contact lens or integrated with a cell phone."

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

In the future there won’t be the need for bulky night vision goggles use by commandos and cat burglars.

This undated publicity photo released by Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. shows Navy SEALs seen through the greenish glow of night vision goggles, as they prepare to breach a locked door in Osama Bin Laden's compound in Columbia Pictures' hyper-realistic new action thriller from director Kathryn Bigelow, "Zero Dark Thirty." (AP Photo/Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc., Jonathan Olley)
This undated publicity photo released by Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. shows Navy SEALs seen through the greenish glow of night vision goggles, as they prepare to breach a locked door in Osama Bin Laden's compound in Columbia Pictures' hyper-realistic new action thriller from director Kathryn Bigelow, "Zero Dark Thirty." (AP Photo/Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc., Jonathan Olley)
AP

The Independent reported:

Previous attempts to use graphene in this way have suffered from the material’s insensitivity towards parts of the light spectrum. The team from Michigan’s breakthrough was to create a sandwich of layers, with an insulating barrier placed between two slices of graphene and an electrical current sent through the bottom part.

Why would you want night vision contact lenses? The possibilities are endless: to avoid stumbling around if you lose power; to walk back to your home or car safely at night; to add to your Batman or Batwoman ensemble. Of course, like the pros and cons of many new inventions, it might give peeping Toms a new tool.

More details are available at the journal of Nature Nanotechnology.