Turns Out, ‘Romneycare’ Saves 300 Lives Per Year

FILE - In this March 15, 2013 file photo, former Massachusetts Gov., and 2012 Republican presidential candidate, Mitt Romney pauses while speaking at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md. Romney says President Barack Obama could have done more to dissuade Russia from annexing Crimea. Romney said Obama didn't have the foresight to anticipate Russia's intentions. He told CBS's "Face the Nation" on Sunday, March 23, 2014, that Obama's "naivete" and "faulty judgment" about Russia has led to a number of foreign policy challenges. He said the U.S. should now welcome nations that seek entry into NATO, should forgo cuts to the nation’s military budget and reconsider putting a missile defense system into the Czech Republic and Poland, as once planned.(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
In this March 15, 2013 file photo, former Massachusetts Gov., and 2012 Republican presidential candidate, Mitt Romney pauses while speaking at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md.
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

A group of researchers published a study last week that examined the effectiveness of “Romneycare,” Massachusetts’ state health care legislation, and found that it has resulted in more than 300 lives being saved each year since it was implemented, Business Insider’s Brett Logiurato reported.

The study focused on specific types of conditions, especially those that would benefit from higher quality treatment. Researchers looked at several types of cancer, cardiovascular disease, infections, among others, the Insider story continued.

The law’s biggest impact in the eight years since former Governor Mitt Romney signed it into law has been seen in lower income areas and areas where fewer people were already insured, Logiurato wrote, citing an article from The Incidental Economist. The state’s health care legislation expanded Medicaid, subsidized private insurance, and mandated Massachusetts residents purchase some health coverage.

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Considering that the Massachusetts law is widely considered the model for the federal government’s Affordable Care Act, the study’s findings could be relevant to the national debate surrounding the law that has become known as “Obamacare,” especially when it comes to cost.

From Business Insider:

According to the Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation, the state spends about $91 million more per year on health costs compared to the years prior to enactment of the law.

According to projections released by the Congressional Budget Office, the net cost of Obamacare in its first year will be about $36 billion, a number that is expected to grow exponentially as more people gain coverage through federal and state exchanges and through the law's expansion of the federal Medicaid program.

Researchers cautioned that while the two pieces of legislation are considered to be related, the study does not prove causality and it is “unclear” how their findings would generalize to the Unites States as a whole.