Mosquitoes With West Nile Found in South Boston

In this Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010 photo, a Cattail mosquito is held up for inspection at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute in Scarborough, Maine. Cattail mosquitos can transmit Eastern equine encephalitis and West Nile virus to humans. (AP Photo/Pat Wellenbach) / OUTTAKe 0910
Cattail mosquito is held up for inspection at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute in Scarborough, Maine. Cattail mosquitos can transmit Eastern equine encephalitis and West Nile virus to humans. (AP Photo/Pat Wellenbach)
AP

The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) announced this afternoon that a mosquito pool in South Boston tested positive for the West Nile virus on August 19. This is the second such announcement this week, but health officials said in a statement this afternoon that the alert level remains at “moderate.”

On Tuesday, August 19, BPHC announced that mosquitoes in Roxbury tested positive for the virus. At this point, West Nile has infected mosquitoes in East Boston, Arlington, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, and Roslindale.

While West Nile poses very low risk to humans, who might contract the virus through mosquito bites, there have been no human cases of West Nile so far this season. Health officials encourage residents to take measures to prevent mosquito bites, such as:

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1. Wearing mosquito repellant.

2. Avoid being outdoors at dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.

3. Wear long sleeves and pants during peak biting time.

4. Clean out empty flower pots, kid pools, and other items around the house that might collect water where mosquitoes can breed.

5. Repair screen doors and screens on windows to keep mosquitoes out of the house.

Check out this video from the Boston Public Health Commission for more tips: