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Career change challenges

Posted by Pattie Hunt Sinacole  June 24, 2013 07:19 AM

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Q: I am a late bloomer and I worked in construction for eight years before I found out what I really wanted for a career. I went to school, graduated, got my certification, but right now prospects are very tight. How do I create a resume for a career in Radiology Tech, when I am not presently working in that field, but I am working full-time?

A: Congrats on finding a career that can bring you joy! There are some who never find what truly makes them happy in their work life.

You were smart to select an occupation in healthcare. Overall, healthcare is an area of expected growth and, in particular, the employment outlook for radiology technologist is quick positive. For more information about this role as a career, visit http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Radiologic-technologists.htm.
Changing fields is a challenge, but not an insurmountable one. I see more and more people change fields within the workforce today when compared to past decades. A few tips for you:
- Stay connected to the career services office of the school from where you graduated. Often the career services office receive job postings and information on who is hiring within your field. They can also help you write a resume which discusses your work history but also conveys your intent to use your recent degree.
- Join a professional association. The American Association of Radiologic Technologists (http://www.asrt.org) is one to consider. There are also career services available through this professional association.
- Join LinkedIn and begin following potential employers. Join career-related groups on LinkedIn.
- Start networking within the profession. Networking opportunities might be available through your college, community, local library or professional association.
- Use free resources available. Visit www.boston.com/jobs. There is quite a bit of content that could be helpful to your job search.
- Several years ago, there was an article posted on www.boston.com specifically addressing career changers. It is still applicable today. You can read this article by clicking on http://www.boston.com/jobs/advice/careerdevelopment/transitions/2010/.
Changing your career is achievable. Good luck!

This blog is not written or edited by Boston.com or the Boston Globe.
The author is solely responsible for the content.

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Meet the Jobs Docs

Patricia Hunt Sinacole is president of First Beacon Group LLC, a human resources consulting firm in Hopkinton. She works with clients across many industries including technology, biotech and medical devices, financial services, and healthcare, and has over 20 years of human resources experience.

Elaine Varelas is managing partner at Keystone Partners, a career management firm in Boston and serves on the board of Career Partners International.

Cindy Atoji Keene is a freelance journalist with more than 25 years experience. E-mail her directly here.

Peter Post is the author of "The Etiquette Advantage in Business." Email questions about business etiquette to him directly here.

Stu Coleman, a partner and general manager at WinterWyman, manages the firm's Financial Contracting division, and provides strategic staffing services to Boston-area organizations needing Accounting and Finance workforce solutions and contract talent.

Tracy Cashman is Senior Vice President and Partner of the Information Technology search division at WinterWyman. She has 20 years of experience partnering with clients in the Boston area to conduct technology searches in a wide variety of industries and technology.

Paul Hellman is the founder of Express Potential, which specializes in executive communication skills. He consults and speaks internationally on how to capture attention & influence others. Email him directly here.

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