As number of Massachusetts farm share programs grows, so does vegetable-induced stress

Farmer Chris Kurth (left) watched as Lisa Karnish, Ember Fleming, Steph Moran, and Andrew Kelly began planting potatoes at Siena Farms in Sudbury last week.
Farmer Chris Kurth (left) watched as Lisa Karnish, Ember Fleming, Steph Moran, and Andrew Kelly began planting potatoes at Siena Farms in Sudbury last week.Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff

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Katherine Ingraham adores having friends over for dinner. But as a member of Stillman Farm’s farm share program, the Brookline hostess has an ulterior motive during peak growing season. “I need help eating all the lettuce,” she said.

That sentiment — and the unexpected stress an overstock of seasonal vegetables can exert — will be familiar to the growing ranks of urban- and suburbanites who are buying farm shares, and in return getting a grocery bag or a bushel of locally grown produce every week. For months.

In the past five years, the number of Massachusetts farms selling Community Supported Agriculture shares, or CSAs, has more than tripled to more than 150, and wait lists are not unheard of.

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