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Linguine with corn and sage

August 5, 2009

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Serves 4

Earthy sage-infused butter makes this sweet corn linguine a summertime standout. Serve it as an indulgent, meatless main course, or pair it with lemony roasted chicken. While you simmer linguine, cook sage, garlic, and corn just until the kernels are tender but still have some bite. Then toss them with the hot pasta. Not much to it, but you’ll impress vegetarians and omnivores alike.

Salt and pepper, to taste
8 large ears fresh corn, shucked
1 pound linguine
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, cut into 8 pieces
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
10 medium leaves fresh sage, finely chopped
1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

2. Meanwhile, set one of the ears of corn on the table. With a small sharp paring knife, remove 3 rows of kernels, pulling the knife toward you. Turn the ear and remove 3 more rows of kernels. Continue until all the corn is off the cob; remove the kernels from the other cobs in the same way. Transfer to a bowl.

3. Drop the linguine into the boiling water. Cook, stirring often, until the water returns to a boil. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes until the pasta is tender but still has some bite. Before draining, remove 1/2 cup pasta cooking water.

4. In a large skillet, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes or until it is translucent. Add the garlic and sage. Cook, stirring often, for 2 minutes more.

5. Turn the heat to medium-high. Add the corn and cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes more or until the corn is cooked through.

6. Drain the pasta into a colander and without shaking off the excess moisture, return it to the cooking pot. With a rubber spatula, scrape the corn mixture into the pasta. Add pasta water, if necessary. Toss well, adding more salt and pepper. Catherine Smart