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Whole hog

Route to fine dining these days goes snout to tail, belly to feet

At Beacon Hill Bistro, the lardo (pictured) is from an imported Mangalitsa pig that chef Jason Bond raised for its light, flavorful, and abundant fat and with which he makes his lardo ravioli. At Beacon Hill Bistro, the lardo (pictured) is from an imported Mangalitsa pig that chef Jason Bond raised for its light, flavorful, and abundant fat and with which he makes his lardo ravioli. (Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff)
By Ike DeLorenzo
Globe Correspondent / February 24, 2010

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Until a few years ago, fine dining meant eating high on the hog. The phrase refers, literally, to the traditionally finer cuts of meat above the belly, such as the top loin, choice ribs, and “Boston’’ roast, which is actually the shoulder. (Full article: 1372 words)

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