RadioBDC Logo
Seasons (Waiting on You) | Future Islands Listen Live
THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Best-guess wonton soup

December 7, 2011
Text size +
  • E-mail
  • E-mail this article

    Invalid E-mail address
    Invalid E-mail address

    Sending your article

    Your article has been sent.

Serves 4

I try to double the wonton part of the recipe when I feel up to it. They’re so good, and you can freeze them in quart-size zipper bags for later. I freeze them raw, but it’s also possible to blanch them (in boiling water for just a couple of minutes, till half-done), then drain and freeze. If you do this, you also have the messy but outrageously good option of deep-frying them, which everyone should try at least once.

WONTONS

1/2  pound shrimp, peeled and deveined  

1  pound ground pork  

2  tablespoons Shaoxing cooking wine or dry sherry  

1  tablespoon soy sauce  

1  piece (1 inch) fresh ginger, finely chopped  

1  clove garlic, finely chopped  

4  scallions (whites only, reserve greens), finely chopped  

1 1/2  teaspoons cornstarch  

1  tablespoon chicken stock  

1 1/2  teaspoons vegetable oil  

1/2  teaspoon sesame oil  

 Pinch of sugar  

1  package (about 45-50) wonton wrappers  

1. Freeze the shrimp for 10 minutes and then chop finely. Hash them a bit finer by holding the knife tip down with one hand and seesawing the blade through the shrimp mass on the cutting board.

2. In a large bowl, combine the shrimp, pork, wine or sherry, soy sauce, ginger, garlic, scallions, cornstarch, chicken stock, vegetable and sesame oils, and sugar. Toss gently but thoroughly; the mixture should remain loose.

3. Set the filling and a small bowl of water on your work area. Take 1 wonton wrapper and set 1 teaspoon of filling in the center. Dip your finger in the water and trace along the top edge and halfway down the sides of the wrapper. Fold the wrapper in half so dry edges meet wet edges. You should have a rectangle with a lump of filling in the middle. Moisten one corner of the folded edge. Draw the other corner of the folded edge over it - not face to face as if you were closing a book, but front to back - and press together firmly. Use the remaining filling to fill the remaining wrappers.

SOUP

6  cups chicken stock  

 Greens from 4 scallions  

1  piece (1 inch) fresh ginger, unpeeled and crushed with the side of a knife  

1  teaspoon salt  

1/2 head Chinese (Napa) cabbage, roughly cut into 1-inch pieces 

1. In a soup pot, combine the broth, scallions, ginger, and salt. Bring to a simmer. Add the wontons. If the broth doesn’t quite cover them, add a bit of water. Salt to taste. Add the cabbage, and any extra wrappers if you have them. Return to a simmer.

2. As the soup cooks, use a spoon to tuck the thickest bits of cabbage into the broth to help cook them through. Simmer for 8 or 9 minutes or until the wontons are cooked through. Ladle into bowls and serve with sauce.

SAUCE

1  piece (1 inch) fresh ginger, finely chopped  

1  clove garlic, finely chopped  

1  scallion, finely chopped  

1/2  teaspoon sugar  

1/2  teaspoon black vinegar (Chinkiang vinegar)  

 Few drops rice vinegar  

1  teaspoon dark sesame oil  

1/3  cup dark soy sauce, or more to taste  

1. In a bowl combine the ginger, garlic, scallion, sugar, black and rice vinegars, and sesame oil. Crush the mixture lightly with a fork or chopsticks to release the flavors. Set aside for 10 minutes.

2. Gradually add the soy sauce. Less soy makes a thick, pungent sauce; more a milder dressing. T. Susan Chang. Adapted from “A Spoonful of Promises’’

  • E-mail
  • E-mail this article

    Invalid E-mail address
    Invalid E-mail address

    Sending your article

    Your article has been sent.