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Ming's delicious avocado puree and chips

Posted by Sheryl Julian  May 17, 2010 12:34 PM

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At a book party last week at Blue Ginger for Lilian Cheung's Savor, owner-chef Ming Tsai and his staff put out lots of beautiful hors d'oeuvres, including this avocado puree, served with Blue Ginger multi-grain brown rice chips, made by Kellogg's and available at Costco and BJ's.

The avocado looks like guacamole, except that it's hardly hot, and it's so bright green that you think it must have a trick ingredient. In fact, it's simply ripe avocado, lime juice, shallot, and fresh cilantro worked into a puree, then a small amount of olive oil is beaten in to lighten the mixture. I asked the restaurant for the recipe, made it, my guests and I polished it off. Then I made it again, and yes, more guests polished off the second batch.

Ming's avocado puree

Makes 1 1/2 cups

1 shallot, cut into quarters

Handful fresh cilantro leaves

Salt and black pepper, to taste

1/4 jalapeno or other hot chili pepper

2 ripe avocados

Juice of 2 limes

2 tablespoons olive oil

1. In a food processor, combine the shallot, cilantro, salt, black pepper, and chili pepper. Work the mixture in on-off motions until it is coarsely chopped.

2. Halve the avocados, scoop the flesh into the food processor and add the lime juice. Work the mixture until it forms a puree. Remove the insert in the processor lid. With the motor running, add the olive oil in a slow steady stream until it is all added.

3. Taste the puree for seasoning and add more salt, lime juice, or jalapeno, if you like. Serve with crackers. Adapted from Blue Ginger

About Dishing

What's cooking in the world of food.

Contributors

Sheryl Julian, the Globe's Food Editor, writes regularly for the Food section.

Devra First is the Globe's food reporter and restaurant critic. Her reviews appear weekly in the Food section.

Ellen Bhang reviews Cheap Eats restaurants for the Globe and writes about wine.
 

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