THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Troubling toll in Thoreau's backyard

Scientists say species drop amid warming

Some species have adapted to climate changes by flowering early and have thus remained relatively common, such as the harlequin blueflag, above. Some species have adapted to climate changes by flowering early and have thus remained relatively common, such as the harlequin blueflag, above. (Abraham Miller-Rushing)
By Billy Baker
Globe Correspondent / October 28, 2008

E-mail this article

Invalid E-mail address
Invalid E-mail address

Sending your article

Your article has been sent.

Text size +

In the 1850s, a few years after he had gone to "live deliberately" in a cabin in the woods at Walden Pond, Henry David Thoreau began to compile detailed records on hundreds of species of plants in his beloved Concord. Those same data now are being used to measure the effect of climate change, and the news is not good, ... (Full article: 768 words)

This article is available in our archives:

Globe Subscribers

FREE for subscribers

Subscribers to the Boston Globe get unlimited access to our archives.

Not a subscriber?

Non-Subscribers

Purchase an electronic copy of the full article. Learn More

  • $9.95 1 month archives pass
  • $24.95 3 months archives pass
  • $74.95 1 year archives pass