Those traumatized by the Boston Marathon bombings may just be starting to see signs; experts urge anyone affected to seek help

“A lot of my patients have told me they feel like they're supposed to be over it when they see the Boston Strong sign, when they really need time to process the traumatic events,” said Monica O'Neal, a clinical psychologist.
“A lot of my patients have told me they feel like they're supposed to be over it when they see the Boston Strong sign, when they really need time to process the traumatic events,” said Monica O'Neal, a clinical psychologist.Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

This is a summary. To read the whole story subscribe to BostonGlobe.com

Four weeks after the bombings at the Boston Marathon, life for many in the city has regained a sense of normalcy. But for some — particularly victims, their caregivers, and others who witnessed the blasts — life may still be a struggle.

Those, who are still facing overwhelming fear and take pains to avoid the site of the April 15 bombings, could be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, mental health experts say.

They may see images of smoke, bloody victims, and frantic crowds flashing in front of them unbidden while riding the T or walking to work. Or they could be drinking coffee with a friend when a loud truck honk triggers a surge of panic.

Full story for BostonGlobe.com subscribers.

Get the full story with unlimited access to BostonGlobe.com.

Just 99 cents for four weeks.

Share