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5 Best apps for meditation

After writing extensively on the benefits of meditation, I’ve been eager to take a meditation class to learn the practice. I signed up for a few in my local area but have never made it to one due to my work or family conflicts. Meditating on my own schedule appears to work better for me. Thus, I decided to test some of the latest meditation apps that were recommended to me by meditation researchers during previous interviews; all can be downloaded for free.

  • Mental health
  • Should some pregnant women should take a daily aspirin?

    While healthy pregnant women are normally warned off all medications to prevent any harm to their developing baby, some should consider taking a daily baby aspirin after their first trimester if they’re at increased risk of developing preecamplsia, a dangerous condition related to high blood pressure. That proposed recommendation was issued on Monday by the US Preventive Services Task Force, a government-sponsored panel of prevention experts.

  • Health news
  • Women's health
  • Sneezes spread cold viruses further than once thought, MIT researchers find

    Leave it to Massacusetts Institute of Technology researchers to determine why it’s important to sneeze into your elbow — even if no one’s nearby — rather than out into the empty air in front of you. It turns out virus droplets expelled through a cough or sneeze travel in an invisible cloud five to 200 times further than if they had been moving as isolated particles on their own.

    Eczema doesn’t go away in most children, study finds

    A new study published this week in JAMA Dermatology suggests the children don’t usually outgrow eczema: Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania followed more than 7100 children with eczema for several years and found that the skin condition lingered through the teens. Only 50 percent of those who reached age 20 had at least one six-month period where they were free of symptoms.

    FDA approves user-friendly device to reverse opioid drug overdoses

    Family, friends or passersby Consumers who encounter a person passed out from a heroin or other opiod overdose may soon be able to administer a drug to reverse the effects themselves before waiting for first responders to arrive. The US Food and Drug Administration announced on Thursday the approval of auto-injector device, called Evzio, to administer naloxone hydrochloride. It can be carried in a pocket or stored in a medicine cabinet and will be available by prescription this summer.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • Benefits of mammograms may have been oversold, new study finds

    Doctors may have oversold the benefits of mammography and underplayed its risks, which has left many women unable to make an informed decision about whether or not to have regular breast cancer screenings beginning at age 40. That troubling finding is based on the latest review of research conducted by Havard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers, which concluded that mammograms decrease a woman’s risk of dying from breast cancer by a modest 19 percent.

  • Health news
  • Women's health
  • Is juicing good for us?

    Juicing is a popular diet trend with questionable nutritional benefits. Nutritionist Joan Salge Blake sets the record straight in this Be Well, Boston video.

    CDC: Flu hitting younger populations this season

    The 2013-2014 influenza season so far is affecting younger and middle-age adults in greater proportion, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s latest seasonal statistics released Thursday. The rate of flu-related hospitalizations for this group is climbing, while they are the least likely to be vaccinated.

    What is multiple myeloma cancer?

    Tom Brokaw, a special correspondent for NBC News, is being treated for multiple myeloma. An oncologist at Dana Farber in Boston, who is not treating Brokaw, shared the latest prognosis on treating and surviving this type of cancer.

    The top trending diets in Boston

    We’ve entered that next pivotal phase after a month-long saga of resolution-fueled dieting in which people who have been trying to lose weight either stick with their program, or give up. Wondering what Boston is eating (or avoiding)? According to Google, these were the city’s top trending diets in January 2014.

    Eating too much added sugar linked to higher risk of dying from heart disease

    A new study confirms that eating too much sugar is bad for our heart and could lead to an earlier death. The research, published online Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, examined nutrition surveys from nearly 12,000 Americans and found that those who reported consuming the greatest percentage of calories from added sugar were twice as likely to die from heart disease over a 14-year period compared to those who consumed the least.

  • Health news
  • Nutrition
  • Pot is not ‘more dangerous than alcohol’? Science lacking on Obama’s claim

    When President Obama declared in a recent New Yorker magazine interview that he doesn’t think pot “is more dangerous than alcohol,” he seemed to contradict his own administration’s policy that’s firmly against the legalization of marijuana. He also seemed to indicate that the pot smoking he did in his teens had no major health impact -- but research is lacking to determine this with any certainty.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • How to combat seasonal depression

    In this video, Harvard Vanguard nutritionist Anne Danahy shares tips and tricks to combat seasonal affective disorder, as well as how to tell when the winter blues might be a more serious mental health issue.

    Heart device upgrades get speedy approval making safety risks more likely, study finds

    Most upgraded pacemakers and defibrillators go through a speedy “supplement” review because they’re considered to be updated versions of older devices with just minor modifications. But according to a study conducted by Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers, many of these devices have undergone substantial changes that may require better testing to ensure their safety.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • Americans are making healthier food choices

    It’s a good news day for the battle against American obesity. An extensive report by the US Department of Agriculture shows American adults have made improvements in their eating habits, from eating out less to buying healthier groceries.

    Have cigarettes become more addictive?

    As public health officials mark the 50th anniversary of the first US Surgeon General’s report warning about the health hazards of smoking, some point out that although we’ve come a long way in reversing our nation’s addiction to nicotine, we still have a long way to go—especially when it comes to lowering nicotine levels in each puff.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • X-ray shows acupuncture gone wrong

    A South Korean woman’s knee x-ray, taken after a series of acupuncture treatments for osteoarthritis, and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, captures an interesting visual showing how acupuncture treatments can complicate reading x-rays.

    Brain rest helps kids heal faster from concussions

    For years neurologists have been telling kids with sports-related concussions to give their brains a rest meaning—not just a break from physical activity—but also abstaining from cognitive challenges like reading, texting, or playing video games for several days. But that advice wasn’t backed by any real evidence indicating that it helped the brain heal faster, until now.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • Can Viagra relieve menstrual cramps?

    Some women suffer debilitating menstrual cramp pain every month without any relief from current treatments. That’s led researchers on a quest, and they’ve seen some promising results with the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra.

    Insomnia linked to earlier death in men

    Are your worries keeping you up at night? Well, a new finding -- about insomnia itself -- could make it harder to get a little shut-eye tonight. Men who have trouble falling asleep at night or other insomnia symptoms had a 25 percent greater likelihood of dying over six years compared to those who had no sleep troubles, according to Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers.

  • Health news
  • Mental health
  • Calm down! The pill won’t make you go blind

    The research finding, presented at the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s annual meeting this week, found that women who took birth control pills for three or more years had double the risk of developing glaucoma. But there are too many caveats in this “study” to count.

    Researchers identify first gene mutations linked to eating disorders

    Eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia have long been known to run in families, but scientists haven’t been able to identify specific gene mutations linked to them -- until now. In a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers studied the genes of two families severely affected by eating disorders and found two mutations associated with the mental conditions.

  • Health news
  • Mental health
  • Married cancer patients live longer than singles, Dana-Farber study finds

    Married people get diagnosed earlier with cancer, are more likely to get the appropriate treatment, and are less likely to die from the disease than non-married folks, finds a new Dana-Farber Cancer Institute study. The researchers used a national database to survey nearly 735,000 patients diagnosed with one of 10 different types of cancer and found that those who were married were 20 percent less likely to die of their cancers compared to those who weren’t married.

  • Health news
  • Mental health
  • Can healthy lifestyle changes reverse cell aging?

    How motivated would you be to forgo the cheesecake, pratice relaxation techniques, and hit the gym if you knew that altering your lifestyle could not only slow, but actually reverse the aging of your cells? For the first time, researchers have produced preliminary evidence that this could be the case, but the findings need to be replicated in larger clinical trials.

  • Health news
  • Preventive care
  • One patient’s experience

    Recently, I interviewed a local Boston doctor to see if he might be a good primary care physician for me. My requirements were fairly straightforward, ones that anyone would seek: a compassionate bedside manner, solid commitment to the patient’s long-term health, and admitting privileges at a top hospital. The doctor met all of these criteria, but in the end, we were not a match. Why?

    Exercise to beat insomnia: you need more than you think

    It’s a Catch-22: A night of poor sleep leaves you tired and drained of energy, and the very thing that could help improve your sleep -- exercise -- is the last thing you’re inclined to do. What’s more, new research suggests that while exercise does help to improve sleep over time, a single workout one morning doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll fall asleep easier that night.

  • Health news
  • Fitness
  • Can brain imaging prove that heaven isn’t real?

    In a quest to prove that heaven exists, or perhaps really doesn’t, neuroscientists have been attempting to study near-death experiences. The latest study garnering prominent coverage concludes that near-death experiences are the creation of our brain; that’s a pretty big leap to make, however, since the University of Michigan researchers were studying rats, not humans.

  • Health news
  • Mental health
  • Can drinking hot chocolate keep your brain young?

    In a small study published in Wednesday in the journal Neurology, researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital found that drinking two cups of hot cocoa every day for 30 days improved blood flow to the brain in 18 seniors with vascular problems due to Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure. Should you drink more cocoa?

  • Health news
  • Aging
  • Would you want to live to 120?

    Would you choose to live to 120 or beyond if medical advances could take you well past the century mark? That’s a question that was posed to 2,000 American adults of all ages in a recent survey conducted by Pew Research Center.

  • Aging
  • BPA linked to infertility, but tough for women to avoid

    A growing body of evidence suggests that women who have high levels of bisphenol-A -- a chemical used in some hard plastics and to coat metal cans -- are more likely to suffer from infertility, and now researchers have found a possible reason why. BPA may disrupt eggs from maturing properly, according to a study from Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers.

  • Women's health
  • You’ve got mail: Someone else’s medical test results

    The first e-mail came at the end of June. It was from a doctor’s office in another state -- a large cardiology group. The note listed the name of a test. It listed the full name of a patient. It listed the full name of the doctor who treated that patient. It said the test was normal and provided a number that I could call for more information. Presumably, this was supposed to be good news. But it was someone else’s test result.

    Managing back pain: 7 mistakes doctors commonly make

    Many patients who don’t have a medical reason for their back pain -- like a spine injury from a car accident -- get unnecessary imaging tests and treatment with surgeries that won’t do much to ease their discomfort. And the problem seems to be getting worse, according to a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, because doctors aren’t following practice guidelines.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • Can wearing a cold cap prevent hair loss from chemotherapy?

    Several news reports this week have highlighted the supposed benefits of placing a cold cap on the scalp to prevent hair loss from chemotherapy. While these reports have emphasized the experimental nature of the device -- it hasn’t yet been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration -- some women have been using them on their own at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and elsewhere.

  • Women's health
  • Four steps to cancer-free grilling

    When you get the grill going on the Fourth of July, take care to BBQ safely. Grilling puts you near cancer-causing chemicals, warn Dana-Farber Cancer Institute doctors -- but with a few precautions, it’s easy to have a safe and healthy holiday.

    Finally proof that sunscreen slows skin aging

    Any dermatologist will tell you that most of the wrinkles and age spots we develop through the years can be blamed on sun exposure, but can we actually look younger by regularly using sunscreen? That’s always been assumed but never tested in a rigorous clinical trial -- until now.

  • Aging
  • Chat Tuesday: Dr. Jonathan Edlow on Lyme disease

    Cases of Lyme disease are rising and so is the controversy on the nature of the diagnosis and methods of treating the condition, Boston Globe reporter Beth Daley writes in her special report on Lyme Disease. Dr. Jonathan Edlow, vice chair of emergency medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, discussed your questions on Lyme disease.

    Weekly challenge: curb obesity in your pet

    As Americans have gotten fatter over the years, so have their pets. About 53 percent of dogs and 58 percent of cats are overweight, according to a 2013 survey of veterinarians conducted by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. What to do if you think your dog or cat may be overweight.

  • Health news
  • Power foods for your brain

    Can what you eat actually affect how well your brain ages? That’s been a subject of heated debate, but nutrition activist Dr. Neal Barnard believes a vegan diet will protect our brains from memory loss and other signs of Alzheimer’s disease. He makes the case in his new book Power Foods for the Brain.

    Burger King expanding delivery service but still not in Boston

    As if drive-throughs weren’t enough, now Burger King now offers a delivery service to all those who are too lazy to get up, step into their cars, and drive to the nearest location. The fast-food chain announced on Tuesday that it would now be delivering to Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. That’s in addition to deliveries already made in New York, Miami, and Houston. Would you like to see the service expand to Boston?

  • Health news
  • Nutrition
  • Which meats are most likely to give you food poisoning?

    What are the riskiest meats? After examining more than 33,000 cases of foodborne illness connected to beef, pork, and poultry, a nutrition activist group concluded that chicken and ground beef are the most likely to make you really sick, while chicken nuggets, ham, and sausage pose the lowest risk of foodborne illness. The group, Center for Science in the Public Interest, created a risk pyramid as a guide for consumers to assess the health risks of handling certain raw meats.

  • Nutrition
  • Boston health officials revise downward number injured in bombings to 264

    Boston public health officials said Tuesday they have revised downward their estimate of the number of people injured in the marathon attacks, to 264. A spokesman for the Boston Public Health Commission had said Monday that state health officials had counted 282 people who were injured and treated at Greater Boston hospitals, as of Saturday. Why did the number decrease? “It turns out that we had double-counted some patients that were transferred from one hospital to another,” said the spokesman.

  • Health news
  • Going stir crazy? How to deal

    If you’re like most of Boston stuck inside and experiencing feordom -- fear mixed with boredom -- today, you may wondering how to deal with that feeling of being pent up like a caged animal. A lot of you tweeted us @BeWellBoston that you’re turning to ice cream, a lot of it, to get you through the day. Others have been planking. Good for you! Here are a few videos to watch to boost your mood through laughter, focused attention via meditation, and exercise.

  • Mental health
  • Why do few high-risk women take drugs to prevent breast cancer?

    With little fanfare and scant media coverage, a government task force recommended on Monday that women at high risk of breast cancer consider taking drugs to prevent the disease. The primary care physicians on the panel reaffirmed their previous recommendations made back in 2002, but few high-risk women opt to take the estrogen-blocking medications -- either tamoxifen or raloxifene -- and I’m guessing very few will likely take them in the future. Here’s why.

  • Drugs/Treatments
  • Women's health
  • Coping with the marathon bombing: expect fear, anxiety, and anger, psychologists say

    Anger, frustration, a sense of helplessness, depression, overwhelming fear. Mental health experts say those in Boston should expect to feel a range of those emotions over the next few days as they try to process the horrors of Monday’s marathon bombing. The extent to which they’re negatively affected depends on how close they were to the events -- whether they witnessed them firsthand or had a loved one who was injured -- and their brain’s individual coping skills. Here’s what mental health experts recommend to cope.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • Mental health
  • Are there health benefits to going bra-less? Study suggests yes

    Like many women, I’ve always had a love-hate relationship with my bra. I bought my first padded bra at 13, and tried push-up bras after nursing three kids, but found them too uncomfortable to wear for very long. Sports bras and camisoles are by far the most comfortable, but they’re also the least attractive. A growing number of women, though, are simply opting out -- a throwback to the bra-burning days of the ‘60s. And one French researcher says that could be providing them with health benefits.

  • Health news
  • Women's health
  • Spring shoes that won’t destroy your feet: what to look for

    Sandal season will soon be upon us, and I’ve been perusing websites for spring shoes that provide enough comfort and support to walk around the city after work. That’s proving to be a tough challenge based on advice I received from Dr. Kenneth Leavitt, chief of podiatric medicine and reconstructive foot surgery at New England Baptist Hospital. Flats are out, he told me, as are sky-high heels. “You should look for a shoe with one-inch heel differential,” Leavitt said.

  • Preventive care
  • Women's health
  • Energy drinks: health risks increased by misleading labels

    Have we become a nation of energy-boosting addicts? Sure, most of us drink caffeinated coffee to get a little boost, but now we’re spending more than $12.5 billion a year on energy drinks, shots, and drink mixes -- 60 percent more than we spent in 2008. No wonder energy drink makers are so eager to keep their products on shelves despite facing wrongful death lawsuits and harsh warning letters from federal health officials, members of Congress, and consumer watchdog groups.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • Breast cancer radiation treatments raise risk of future heart disease

    The vast majority of the nearly 300,000 American women diagnosed with breast cancer each year receive radiation treatment to help prevent a relapse, yet a new study suggests that those treatments increase the risk of heart attacks and of dying from heart disease up to 20 years later. These findings, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, emphasize the need for better cardiac care for breast cancer survivors, many of whom also take chemotherapy drugs that weaken their heart muscle.

  • Health news
  • Women's health
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • Should male baldness be a new heart disease risk factor?

    Should men have their hairline checked -- along with their weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol -- to assess their heart disease risk? That seems to be the take home message of a study published Wednesday in the British Medical Journal Open, which found that men with severe baldness had as much as a 44 percent greater risk of developing heart disease over the course of 10 to 15 years than men with hair.

  • Health news
  • Men's health
  • New website makes finding a clinical trial easier

    While we’d all like to have straight-forward medical diagnoses with simple solutions, some of us get thrown the curve balls: a rare disease that strikes fewer than 1 in 10,000, or a life-threatening illness with no known cure. In these cases, entering a clinical trial may make sense for patients. A new website, myclinicaltriallocator.com, makes it easier to find one.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • FDA: Longer use of nicotine gum safe for helping smokers quit, but e-cigarettes not recommended

    After writing about a new anti-smoking ad campaign, a few of you mentioned that you’ve been using e-cigarettes to help you quit and prefer the battery-operated devices over other nicotine patches, lozenges and gum. But the FDA calls e-cigarettes unsafe and is now saying that other nicotine replacement aids can be used long-term to help smokers wean themselves off nicotine.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • Statin side effects: Brigham and Women’s Hospital study indicates they usually go away

    Statins have a great track record for lowering cholesterol and helping heart disease patients live longer, but about half of those taking statins stop taking the drugs at some point -- often due to side effects. Now a Brigham and Women’s Hospital study suggests that more than 90 percent of patients who go back on statins don’t have the same troubles the second time around.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • Will the CDC’s new anti-smoking ads really help smokers quit?

    The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has once again released a batch of graphic anti-smoking ads, aimed at motivating smokers to quit by showing the horrible health effects of the nasty habit. But, in my opinion, the campaign emphasizes an over-simplified message: that to quit, all smokers need is a little fear. For the next 12 weeks, the grisly ads will run as public service announcements on TV and in movie theaters, magazines, and newspapers.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • More than 1 in 3 moms feed infants solids too soon: advice on when to start

    Pediatricians, along with emphasizing the benefits of breast-feeding over infant formula, have recently been pushing parents to delay the introduction of solid foods until a baby is 6 months old. But many parents haven’t gotten the message: More than 40 percent of mothers reported that they fed their infants solid foods such as rice cereal before age 4 months, according to a study by researchers at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • Are temporary tattoos toxic? FDA warns against them

    As spring break season gets underway, the US Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning against a dangerous practice that many college kids engage in while on vacation. No, not binge drinking or using tanning oil instead of sunscreen: getting a temporary tattoo. These typically last from three days to several weeks and use a dye like henna to tint the skin without piercing beneath the skin’s surface -- as with a permanent tattoo.

  • Health news
  • Weekly challenge: Design a better condom for $100,000

    Have an idea for a better condom that will entice men outside of committed relationships to wear one every time? Send it to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. They’re offering $100,000 in a start-up grants and up to $1 million in continued funding to anyone who designs the “next generation condom that significantly preserves or enhances pleasure, in order to improve uptake and regular use.”

  • Health news
  • Men's health
  • New autism risk factor: Women abused as children more likely to have child with the disorder

    Autism diagnoses have continued to climb, and 2 percent of American children ages 6 to 17 have received the diagnosis, according to parent surveys collected in 2011 to 2012, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday. A study released the same day and led by a Harvard researcher pointed to a new risk factor for autism: Women abused as children were 60 percent more likely to have a child with autism than mothers who reported no abuse.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • Pediatricians’ group comes out in support of gay marriage and adoptions by homosexual single parents

    As the Supreme Court prepares to consider the legality of gay marriage next week, the American Academy of Pediatrics, which represents thousands of pediatricians, took a firm position Thursday in support of gay civil marriages in a policy statement drafted by two Boston doctors. The group also came out in support of full adoption and foster care rights for all parents, regardless of sexual orientation; the pediatricians said states should not limit adoptions nor foster care placements to single parents who are heterosexuals.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • Pediatricians’ group comes out in support of gay marriage and adoptions by homosexual single parents

    As the Supreme Court prepares to consider the legality of gay marriage next week, the American Academy of Pediatrics, which represents thousands of pediatricians, took a firm position Thursday in support of gay civil marriages in a policy statement drafted by two Boston doctors. The group also came out in support of full adoption and foster care rights for all parents, regardless of sexual orientation; the pediatricians said states should not limit adoptions nor foster care placements to single parents who are heterosexuals.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • Should you skip surgery for torn knee tissue?

    For the nearly 20 percent of Americans considering surgery to fix their knee pain, a new Brigham and Women’s Hospital study suggests that they may want to hold off for a bit -- even if an imaging scan reveals a torn meniscus. Most older individuals with meniscus tears that often occur with aging and arthritis get the same long-term relief with time and physical therapy as they do with surgery, according to the findings published Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • New concussion rules for athletes highlight importance of proper diagnosis

    With increased awareness about the risks of concussions, athletic coaches and trainers know that they shouldn’t allow any player who sustains one to remain on the field. But sometimes it’s tough for them to tell. For this reason, the American Academy of Neurology issued new recommendations this week outlining a basic strategy to assess players with head injuries on the field -- including one assessment test that coaching staff in Massachusetts aren’t required to do.

  • Health news
  • Children's health
  • Rabies death in Maryland resident due to organ transplant

    A patient who contracted and died of rabies earlier this month in Maryland contracted the disease after a kidney transplant a year earlier, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed on Friday. Three other people were infected as well and are being treated for rabies. The organ donor wasn’t tested for rabies at the time of donation and isn’t thought to have died of the disease.

  • Health news
  • FDA warns about Zithromax and risk of fatal heart problems

    The US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning today about the popular and powerful antibiotic azithromycin (Zithromax or Zmax), saying that it could lead to a potentially fatal irregular heart rhythm in patients who are at higher risk for heart problems. These include people with low blood levels of potassium or magnesium or a slower than normal heart rate, or who use certain drugs to treat abnormal heart rhythms, or arrhythmias.

  • Health news
  • Drugs/Treatments
  • Is Kim Kardashian’s vampire facial safe for you and does it work?

    Kardashian has publicized a cringe-inducing “vampire facial” she had on her reality show that involves a messy amount of blood. The facial involves drawing two teaspoonfuls of blood from the arm, spinning it down to separate out a layer filled with platelets, growth factors, and a few stray stem cells, and reinjecting that mixture through tiny needles all over the face to purportedly rebuild collagen and smooth skin. Does it work and is it risky?

  • Health news
  • Aging
  • Weekly challenge: reduce pet allergens in your home

    About 15 percent to 30 percent of people with allergies have allergic reactions to furry or feathered pets. The dander -- a combination of dead skin cells and hair (or feathers) -- shed by cats, dogs, and birds can trigger sneezing, runny nose, and itchy watery eyes in those who are susceptible. Here are some ways to reduce them.

  • Preventive care
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