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The next big thing

Posted by Elizabeth Comeau  May 30, 2013 07:00 AM

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Nope, it's not an ultramarathon or something crazy like that (yet), this blog post is less about fitness and more about my personal next big thing: A new gig here at The Globe.

I will still be writing posts in this blog on a weekly basis as I have since I started the blog, but I'll no longer be @BeWellBoston on twitter because I was offered a new opportunity here at The Boston Globe that I just couldn't pass up as the new social media marketing manager.


BeWellBoston will still be alive and thriving thanks to my amazing colleagues here in health and across the building who will continue to work to update the health section to bring you the news you need to know.

That's the short version.

But, if you have been reading this blog long enough you know there's always a long version, too.

My very first post of this blog started with this:

Welcome to the Get Moving blog – the blog that will change your life.

Well, OK. Maybe not.

But I’m hoping to change mine, and I’ll need your help.

Every week since that first post I've tried to be as open and honest with you all about my struggles to get fit, lose the weight I gained over the years, tackle my first 5K, 10K, half-marathon (and come October, my first full-marathon). It hasn't always been pretty, you haven't always agreed with me, but I've put myself out on the line because changing my life is a daily struggle.

As I said, I'll still be doing that here, on this blog. But this time it will be through @EJComeau. I like to think of this switch as a way of really giving myself a chance to just be who I am. I'm not perfect, sometimes I'm grumpy, I'm slightly crazy and quirky, but that's me.

You, dear readers, have helped to show me that you can do anything if you want to: Including take a giant leap in to a new role. I have a long, long list of goals I'd still like to achieve, and making this move to this new job will allow me to pursue many of the things on that list.

A colleague here said "I feel like you're cutting @BeWellBoston's vocal chords," when I told her of the shift away from being the producer for the health section here at Boston.com.

While yes, it's true, that I gave BeWell it's quirky voice, the truth is, the new voice of BeWell will still give you valuable, interesting information. And my voice will still be around -- a lot.

I'm not cutting the vocal chords from one thing to bring them to another, instead I'd like to think of it as finally having the courage to really speak for myself.

I'll see you all next post. In the meantime, tweet at me (@EJComeau).

Thank you all for giving me the courage to change my life yet again.

Staying fit is an important part of staying healthy. This blog will offer exercise tips from experts as well as share the personal journeys of Globe staff members committed to fitness. No matter your age or energy level, we invite you to join in and share your own story. How do you find time to work out? What are your daily challenges? Let us know and read along -- and together, we can all get moving.

CONTRIBUTORS

Elizabeth Comeau is a social media marketing manager at Boston.com. She will be blogging about her personal fitness journey and using a device called a FitBit to track her weekly goals and progress (see below). Follow her journey and share your own. Read more about Elizabeth and this blog.

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