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Around New England: Brown, In Dissonance There's Harmony

December 3, 2013 04:48 PM  

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Weighing just a tad under two pounds, Brown University: The Campus Guide (Princeton Architectural Press, $35) is not really a portable guidebook. Rather, it is a beautifully written architectural history of the Ivy League university in the Rhode Island capital.

Brown University is one of the hottest of hot colleges and this guide reminds us of just how much the school’s inherent appeal is physical. How a campus looks cannot be divorced from its educational mission and the way the Providence campus has grown and evolved in a quarter of millennium demonstrates that it is not the result of a branding campaign. Brown, author Raymond P. Rhinehart argues, offers “a magical urban tapestry that evokes a special sense of place.” Rhinehart, a Brown alumnus, makes his alma mater’s patrimony (“a textbook ensemble of American architecture, from colonial times to the present”) accessible through nine walks, supported by maps and luscious photos by Walter Smalling. Rhinehart is a consummate storyteller; his comprehensive history of the building arts at Brown offers good tales and delightful anecdotes.

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John Hay Library, Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, 1910

Architectural history can be dull, but wordsmith Rhinehart covers more than the design of buildings. He enjoys witty metaphors (“Philip Johnson, an architect who shed styles as often as snakes shed skin”), but Rhinehart’s conversational tone skirts the controversial (Diller, Scofidio + Renfro’s Granoff’s Center is “a zinc and glass hand grenade tossed with giddy abandon”) and skillfully deals with buildings he clearly does not like (“How do you evaluate a building that lacks curb appeal but may in fact do everything it was programmed to do?”). When he discusses Robert A.M. Stern’s new fitness center (a building with the gravitas of saran wrap), Rhinehart quotes Stern, but wryly notes that “Within this Neo-Colonial skin beats a contemporary heart that is no stranger to computer-aided design.”


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Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, 2011

This small university has significant buildings by important designers — local and national figures, not to mention a literal who’s who of Boston architects. Yet for every Richard Upjohn or Charles McKim, the place was not well served by the over-reliance on a “Colonial” aesthetic. Williamsburg architects Perry, Shaw, Hepburn & Dean created an oppressive preponderance of red brick.


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Wriston Quad, Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, & Dean, 1952

The wonder of Brown is its magnificent collection of buildings of various levels of quality that form a first-class whole. This campus guide is the story of place making, the creation of a utopian Eden that characterizes the world's great academies. Flâneur Rhinehart correctly insists that Brown campus must be understood from a series of walking tours. Brown did not have a master plan until recently, yet it has always been an integral part of the fabulous townscape of Providence (“The layering of history in this one place is extraordinary”). Ray Rhinehart understands the idea of place making. “Like the separate sections of an orchestra, the impression each building makes is distinct yet well tuned to the others to achieve a harmony not unlike a city or a village that has grown organically over time.”


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William Morgan

Photographer Walter Smalling (left) and his husband, author Raymond Rhinehart, with the Soldiers Arch by Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, 1928, in the background.

Great design is always at your fingertips — read the November/December 2013 issue online!

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About this blog

An insider's look at must-have products, fresh trends, and inspired spaces from the team at Design New England magazine.

Gail Ravgiala is editor of Design New England and a fan of both the region's historic architecture and its growing inventory of modern houses and public buildings.

Courtney Kasianowicz is associate editor of Design New England who scouts the area for new design, charming products, and local artisans both innovative and daring.

Jill Connors, Design New England's editor-at-large, is an antiques maven and design scout and will post about trends and discoveries in the field.

Bruce Irving, Design New England's contributing editor for architecture & building, is a renovation specialist who will share his insights on design and construction.

Estelle Bond Guralnick, Design New England's style & interiors editor, will post about interior design and interior designers and her favorite finds.

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