Mass. prosecutors say they’ll wait for Ala. sentencing before deciding how to proceed in Amy Bishop case

Amy Bishop is escorted by sheriff's deputies at the Madison County Courthouse in Hunstville, Ala., Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012. Court officials say Bishop has pleaded guilty to fatally shooting three colleagues and wounding three others at a faculty meeting at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. (AP Photo/The Huntsville Times, Michael Mercier)
Amy Bishop was escorted by sheriff's deputies at the Madison County courthouse in Hunstville, Ala., today.Michael Mercier/The Huntsville Times/AP

Norfolk County prosecutors say they’re going to take a wait-and-see attitude before deciding how to proceed in their case against Amy Bishop, now that the former professor has pleaded guilty in Alabama to fatally shooting three colleagues and wounding three others at a faculty meeting at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

“We’ll be interested to see the sentence and will make our determination ... in light of what occurs,” said Norfolk district attorney’s spokesman David Traub.

“We’ll obviously be looking for additional information for us to make an assessment on our Norfolk County charges,” he said.

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Amy Bishop today pleaded guilty in Huntsville, Ala., to one count of capital murder involving two or more people and three counts of attempted murder.

Sentencing in the case will be after a Sept. 24 hearing, and prosecutors initially said they planned to seek the death penalty.

In a phone interview this afternoon, Madison County District Attorney Robert L. Broussard said a plea agreement will be in place on Sept. 24. He would not discuss the agreement and refused to say whether his office is still seeking a death sentence.

“I have no comment,” he said. “We have a gag order ... But I will talk freely about it on the 24th after those proceedings.”

The former biology professor previously had pleaded innocent by reason of insanity in the February 2010 shooting.

Bishop also is charged with killing her brother in Massachusetts in 1986. That shooting was originally ruled accidental, but the Alabama slayings prompted a new investigation and charges.

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