Mild-mannered turkey finds a home at Dorchester bank building

BOSTON, MA. 04/ 03 /13: BANK MASCOT....A wild turkey nicknamed " SANTINA " after Santander, SANTANDER, one of the world's largest banks, the bird has taken up residence at the Sovereign Bank, 2 Morrissey Blvd, Dorchester MA. Entering from the courtyard L-R Bridget Williams and Brinley Jones bank employees. The bank is headquarters for the New England Division of Sovereign Bank and is located on several acres adjacent to I-93 and the JFK/UMass T-station. The turkey survived the winter and all the snow by perching in a tree in one of the numerous courtyards and being fed and watered by numerous employees. Lately, the turkey has moved to the courtyard behind our main entrance. A sign has been posted “not to feed the turkey" because hopefully the bird will leave the property and seek out his compatriots. Sadly, the bird is relatively tame and expects to be fed so just stands beside the courtyard door waiting for a ‘hand-out’. ( David L Ryan/Globe Staff Photo ) SECTION: METRO TOPIC 04turkeyphoto
The turkey has become tame and stands near the door, hoping for handouts.Credit: David L. Ryan/Globe Staff

Unlike its foul-tempered fellows who have ruffled people’s feathers in Brookline, a mild-mannered turkey has become the toast of a Dorchester bank after roosting in the building’s courtyard this winter.

BOSTON, MA. 04/ 03 /13: BANK MASCOT....A wild turkey nicknamed " SANTINA " after Santander, SANTANDER, one of the world's largest banks, the bird has taken up residence at the Sovereign Bank, 2 Morrissey Blvd, Dorchester MA. The bank is headquarters for the New England Division of Sovereign Bank and is located on several acres adjacent to I-93 and the JFK/UMass T-station. The turkey survived the winter and all the snow by perching in a tree in one of the numerous courtyards and being fed and watered by numerous employees. Lately, the turkey has moved to the courtyard behind our main entrance. A sign has been posted �not to feed the turkey" because hopefully the bird will leave the property and seek out his compatriots. Sadly, the bird is relatively tame and expects to be fed so just stands beside the courtyard door waiting for a �hand-out�. ( David L Ryan/Globe Staff Photo ) SECTION: METRO TOPIC 04turkeyphoto
Animal Rescue League officials are hoping that if the employees don’t feed the turkey, it will move on. (David L. Ryan/Globe Staff)The Boston Globe

A 20-pound female turkey has staked a place in Sovereign Bank’s New England division headquarters’ courtyard on Morrissey Boulevard, surviving this winter’s spate of snowstorms perched in the courtyard trees, fed and watered by people in the building, said Brinley Jones, a contractor with the bank.

After an investigation Tuesday, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Rescue Services Team determined the bird didn’t need to be rescued because it’s not injured and can fly in and out of the roughly 50-by-200-foot courtyard on its own.

Advertisement—Continue Reading Below

The team did recommend that the bank post “Do Not Feed” signs to motivate the turkey to leave the property to find food elsewhere, Animal Rescue League of Boston spokeswoman Mia Tavan said. The league will continue to monitor the situation in case additional response or care is needed, she said.

Jones said an employee nicknamed the turkey “Santina,” a takeoff on the name of the company that owns Sovereign, Spanish Santander Group. She added that a maintenance worker also calls the turkey “Sweetie.”

Last summer, the turkey had been outside the building near the street, Jones said. The turkey moved closer and closer to the building, eventually flying into the courtyard, where it has roosted in trees for the last few months.

Jones, a bird fancier, said it’s obvious the turkey is a female because of its sweet temperament, unlike more aggressive, territorial tom turkeys.

“You can walk right up to her,” Jones said. “She’s curious. When she sees people in the windows and doors, she’ll come toward them.”

A receptionist at the Sovereign Bank branch located in the building said she and a lot of other people had photos of the bird saved to their phones.

Earlier this winter, restive tom turkeys terrorized Brookline residents.

Share