FAA approves narrower flight path for Logan runway; residents had balked over noise concerns

Winthrop-03/05613- A jet takes off from Logan Airport. New flight paths over some towns south of Boston have residents worried about noise levels. Globe staff photo by John Tlumacki (metro)
A jet takes off from Logan — some residents fear there will be too many of these over their houses under the new flight path.
John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

The Federal Aviation Administration says it has approved the narrowing of the flight path for one of the runways at Logan International Airport, a plan that has stirred opposition among residents in communities such as Milton and Dedham concerned about more airplane noise.

The FAA said today that it had determined, after conducting a review, that the new GPS-based navigation procedure for Runway 33 Left “will not produce significant environmental impacts.”

The new procedure, which was intended to enhance safety and increase operational efficiency, can be used beginning Wednesday, the FAA said today in a statement.

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The Globe reported in March that there had been a fierce public outcry to the proposal that had caused delays in the process, which began three years ago.

The residents objected because the current flight path, spread out over a 3-mile swath, would become much narrower as planes depart the airport, thus concentrating the noise for homes directly under the flight path.

Runway 33 Left was the only runway at Logan that did not have the new NextGen navigation procedure, the FAA said.

If airplanes don’t have the NextGen technology, they can still use the procedure.

The agency said it would conduct a “post-implementation review” six months following the implementation of this procedure.”