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Study tracks benefit, risk of nanoinvaders

At Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, researchers (from left) Akira Tsuda, John V. Frangioni, and Hak Soo Choi. At Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, researchers (from left) Akira Tsuda, John V. Frangioni, and Hak Soo Choi. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)
By Carolyn Y. Johnson
Globe Staff / November 8, 2010

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For years, scientists studying and creating particles so tiny they would be dwarfed by a human hair have received billions of dollars, leading to progress in fields that range from cancer research to the development of novel materials. (Full article: 745 words)

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