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EDUCATION '05

Rebuilding the High School

Despite heightened standards and schools rising to meet them, a new office in state Department of Education has a seasoned administrator - one with firsthand experience as a frustrated parent - looking at ways to make high schools more rigorous.

It's still possible to avoid a rigorous curriculum in the state's high schools. Stafford Peat doesn't think that kind of system serves students.
It's still possible to avoid a rigorous curriculum in the state's high schools. Stafford Peat doesn't think that kind of system serves students. (Globe Staff Photo / Lane Turner) Globe Staff Photo / Lane Turner
By Chris Berdik
August 28, 2005

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The classic American public high school is a large brick building where lockers line hallways, classrooms hold rows of desks, and maybe 1,500 kids shuffle between classes on everything from calculus to cooking - the jocks, the geeks, the college-bound, the soon-to-drop-out. It's an American institution that was born in Boston, where The English High School opened in 1821. English ... (Full article: 2838 words)

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