boston.com News your connection to The Boston Globe
Today's Globe  |   Latest News:   Local   Nation   World   |  NECN   Education   Obituaries   Special sections  

John Kenneth Galbraith

I WAS IN New York at the offices of Newsweek, in conference with Kay Graham and Arthur Schlesinger about the magazine's treatment of economic affairs. A staff member tiptoed in with word that President Kennedy had been shot; the meeting ended. We flew at once to Washington, where sorrow was diluted by the intense activity that devolved on Kennedy associates. I thought little of the future; intensely of the present. At the base of all feeling was the loss of a greatly admired, greatly loved friend.

I was pressed relentlessly in those days for history, reminiscences. I offered this memory of a precise, candid, amusing, and always wonderful friend. We had breakfast at the White House the day before I joined Catherine Galbraith in New York to go on to New Delhi. The New York Times had an article that morning on the new ambassador to India; Kennedy asked me how I liked it. It was generally favorable and I said it was all right, but I didn't see why they had to call me arrogant. He said, "I don't see why not, everyone else does."

My other astringent memory is of a sentence in a private recounting of the Cuban missile crisis: "You will never know," he told me, "how much bad advice I had."

Economist John Kenneth Galbraith was ambassador to India and an adviser in the Kennedy administration.

SEARCH GLOBE ARCHIVES
 
Globe Archives Sale Today (free)
Yesterday (free)
Past 30 days
Last 12 months