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Philip K. Dick, who had been blowing his mind for a living since the `50s, was right at home in the late-'60s counterculture.

By James Parker
July 25, 2004

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PHILIP K. DICK, who died in 1982, is doing very well these days, embraced in places both high and low. His mind-bending science fiction novels -- a remarkable number of which are still in print -- bristle with blurbs proclaiming him the United States' Borges and its Kafka too. Hollywood has canonized him with adaptations ("Blade Runner," " Total Recall," ... (Full Article: 992 Words)

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