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Across the universe

Physicist Lisa Randall talks about hidden dimensions - and the importance of visible women in the field

Harvard theoretical physicist Lisa Randall's papers on the warped geometry of the universe have made her one of the most cited physicists in the world.
Harvard theoretical physicist Lisa Randall's papers on the warped geometry of the universe have made her one of the most cited physicists in the world. (Globe Staff Photo / Matthew J. Lee) Globe Staff Photo / Matthew J. Lee
By Peter Dizikes
September 4, 2005

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WHATEVER YOUR MANNER of repose while reading this article--sitting, standing, lying down--you most likely feel firmly anchored to the earth. The force of gravity, as you experience it, seems impressively strong. (Full article: 2045 words)

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