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Missing links

Proponents of Intelligent Design have exploited a vexing question at the heart of Darwin's theory. Now, say two leading biologists, scientists can - and must - answer back.

Dr. Marc Kirschner (left), head of the systems biology department at Harvard Medical School, in a laboratory with many species of frogs. Systems biology represents an interdisciplinary approach that he hopes will further the public understanding of evolution. Lehigh University biochemistry professor Michael Behe (right), speaks to reporters after testifying in federal court in Harrisburg, Pa., last Monday. Behe is the originator and main proponent of the term ''irreducible complexity,'' a pillar of Intelligent Design.
Dr. Marc Kirschner (left), head of the systems biology department at Harvard Medical School, in a laboratory with many species of frogs. Systems biology represents an interdisciplinary approach that he hopes will further the public understanding of evolution. Lehigh University biochemistry professor Michael Behe (right), speaks to reporters after testifying in federal court in Harrisburg, Pa., last Monday. Behe is the originator and main proponent of the term ''irreducible complexity,'' a pillar of Intelligent Design. (Matthew J. Lee / Globe Staff File Photo; AP Photo) Matthew J. Lee / Globe Staff File Photo; AP Photo
By Peter Dizikes
October 23, 2005

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IN A FEDERAL courtroom last week in Harrisburg, Pa., site of the ongoing trial to decide whether ninth-grade biology students in Dover should be required to hear about Intelligent Design, Michael Behe, a professor of biochemistry at Lehigh University, took the stand. Behe is the originator and main proponent of the term ''irreducible complexity," a pillar of Intelligent Design, which ... (Full article: 2000 words)

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