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Scholars are split on the Bush administration's use of the Federalist Papers to justify its position on presidential war powers


(Mandel Mgan / AFP / Getty Images (left)) Mandel Mgan / AFP / Getty Images (left)
By Charlie Savage
June 11, 2006

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SINCE THE TERRORIST ATTACKS of Sept. 11, 2001, the Bush administration has made sweeping claims about the power the Constitution gives the president as ``commander in chief." Because the president is responsible for protecting national security, the administration has argued, Congress cannot restrict his powers in a time of war. (Full article: 1468 words)

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