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Oranges to oranges

Organic produce may not be any healthier than the conventional kind. As the organic food movement goes mainstream, critics question whether consumers are getting what they pay for.

The difference between organic produce (left) and conventional (right) may come down to little more than a price tag.
The difference between organic produce (left) and conventional (right) may come down to little more than a price tag. (Globe Photo / Wiqan Ang) Globe Photo / Wiqan Ang
By Drake Bennett
June 18, 2006

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SOMETIME IN THE NEAR future, Wal-Mart will sell its first box of organic Rice Krispies, and the organic food movement, born a century ago as an Arcadian ideology on the agricultural fringe, will have completed its move into the mainstream. In many ways it's already there: Wal-Mart, the nation's leading grocery store, is already aggressively expanding its offerings in everything ... (Full article: 1516 words)

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