THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING
Samuel Beckett in 1970, the year after he received the Nobel Prize.
Samuel Beckett in 1970, the year after he received the Nobel Prize. (Hulton-Deutch Collection / Corbis) Hulton-Deutch Collection / Corbis

Cult of impersonality

Samuel Beckett, who would have been 100 this year, had no use for celebrity--but that, and his rejection of literary style, only made him more famous

By Leland de la Durantaye
July 2, 2006

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FAME IS FLEETING, but to Samuel Beckett's taste, not fleeting enough. If most writers feel themselves condemned to obscurity, for Beckett the opposite was the case. He was, in his own words, ``damned to fame." (Full article: 1482 words)

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