THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

And the buck stops...where?

When the political history of the Big Dig is written, two factors should receive a fair share of the blame: turmoil at the top and a lack of accountability

Turnpike Authority Chairman Matthew J. Amorello (standing) at the Big Dig hearing at the State House in 2002.
Turnpike Authority Chairman Matthew J. Amorello (standing) at the Big Dig hearing at the State House in 2002. (Globe Staff Photo / David L. Ryan) Globe Staff Photo / David L. Ryan
By Robert Keough
July 23, 2006

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THIS WAS SUPPOSED to be the moment when the hand-wringing and the finger-pointing came to an end: The Central Artery was torn down, the tunnels were open, and traffic was flowing over the majestic Zakim Bridge. Instead, a woman is dead, crushed by a 3-ton concrete slab that had been suspended over motorists' heads by industrial-strength adhesive, and the recriminations ... (Full article: 1157 words)

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