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All that is solid

A remarkable exhibit at Hanoi's Museum of Ethnology reminds us why Marxism melted into air

A replica of a small apartment at the Museum of Ethnology's exhibit 'Hanoi Life under the Subsidy Economy, 1975-1986.' The apartment would have housed an 8-member family during Vietnam's command economy period.
A replica of a small apartment at the Museum of Ethnology's exhibit "Hanoi Life under the Subsidy Economy, 1975-1986." The apartment would have housed an 8-member family during Vietnam's command economy period. (Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images) Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images
By Matt Steinglass
September 10, 2006

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FOR A DECADE and a half, one of the West's central narratives has been the triumph of free-market capitalism over the Soviet-style command economy. So why is it that for an exhibit on the hardships of everyday material life in a Communist economy, one must go to Hanoi-capital of a nominally Communist country? (Full article: 1478 words)

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