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Life studies

Biography today reigns supreme -- the most challenging, controversial, and popular form of nonfiction publishing and broadcasting. So why is it still shunned by the academy?

By Nigel Hamilton
March 25, 2007

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Dr. Samuel Johnson, himself an accomplished biographer (and the subject of probably the most famous biography in the English language, Boswell's "Life of Johnson"), wrote that "no species of writing seems more worthy of cultivation than biography." No other form, he declared, can "more certainly enchain the heart by irresistible interest, or more widely diffuse instruction to every diversity of ... (Full article: 1153 words)

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