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'You see the same people every day,' says tuba player Bill Meehan (above, at Park Street station). 'It's almost a ministry, in a way. It makes people happy.' (Globe Photo / Laurie Swope) photos: Boston street musicians
"You see the same people every day," says tuba player Bill Meehan (above, at Park Street station). "It's almost a ministry, in a way. It makes people happy." (Globe Photo / Laurie Swope)
photos: Boston street musicians

Let the Music Play

Tracy Chapman, Shawn Colvin, Joan Baez. They all performed here. Street musicians can turn a drab city block into an impromptu concert. After 100 years of being badgered or silenced by an uptight city, they are finally free to play. So why aren't they celebrating?

By James Sullivan
May 15, 2005

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For songwriter Rosanna Lee, the random acts of kindness were the rewards. Trying out her gentle folk-pop tunes on the sidewalks of Newbury Street, in front of the old Mystery Train record shop or the CVS near Fairfield Street, she was moved by the thoughtfulness of strangers. "Somebody leaves flowers or brings you a water bottle," she says. "So many ... (Full article: 3554 words)

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