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PROFILE

Puzzling Persona

Wayne Gould traded his jurist's wig for a thinking cap, and the Sudoku craze was born.

Wayne Gould wrote a computer program that generates Sudoku puzzles of varying difficulty, gave them to newspapers for free, and then watched the puzzle rocket in popularity worldwide.
Wayne Gould wrote a computer program that generates Sudoku puzzles of varying difficulty, gave them to newspapers for free, and then watched the puzzle rocket in popularity worldwide. (Globe Staff Photo / Bill Greene) Globe Staff Photo / Bill Greene
By Doug Most
November 27, 2005

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Talk about identity crisis. Wayne Gould studied to become a lawyer in his native New Zealand, then left in the early 1980s to be a judge in Hong Kong. But when the colony passed from Britain to China in 1997, he left the courts to chase a different dream. (Full article: 930 words)

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